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PUBLIC DOCUMENT. No. 18 



NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TKUSTEES 



State Primary and Reform Schools 



ANNUAL REPOKTS OF THE RESIDENT OFFICERS, 






For the Year ending Sept. 30, 1887. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1888. 
■ 






JSE, BOSTON. 



.387 



A 



Cammonfoealtlr of l|tassarbus*its. 



TRUSTEES' KEPORT. 



STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL AT MOXSON. 

To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council : 

During the year just closed the school has been attended 
with a good degree of prosperity and success. In all efforts 
to promote its welfare the Superintendent and other officers 
have worked in entire harmony with the Trustees. No seri- 
ous epidemic has visited the school, and the rate of mortal- 
ity has not exceeded the average of former years. From 
about the first of December until April tenth, scarlet fever 
and diphtheria prevailed, but in so mild a form that only 
two deaths resulted from these diseases. A few cases of 
sickness were of such a threatening nature that Dr. Hol- 
brook, of Palmer, was called to counsel with the resident 
physician. As a rule, however, the latter has found no 
occasion to call for outside aid. 

Under the recent changes in the settlement laws, and the 
plan of boarding children away from the school, the popula- 
tion has continued to decrease, the average for the current 
year being 332, or 59 less than that of last year. In view 
of the fact that the average age of the children boarded in 
private families is much below that of those remaining at the 
school, it is not easy to estimate correctly the comparative 
expense of their support, but there can be no doubt that the 
advantages accruing to those who are so fortunate as to be 
placed in good families will more than compensate for any 
pecuniary loss that may be sustained. Among the obvious 
benefits growing out of the school are those which result 



4 PEIMAEY AND EEFOEM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

from taking so many of the children from the cities and large 
towns, and the associations which in their neglected condi- 
tion they are certain to form, and subjecting them to the 
restraints and discipline of the school while conferring upon 
them the educational advantages which are there afforded. 
Add to the benefits which the school is intended to confer, 
the influence of a good home, and the object sought has been 
in a great measure attained. 

Eegarding the employment of the children there has been 
no essential change. The only labor they are called upon 
to perforin is that pertaining to the school and form. In 
the various departments, many of them are required to ren- 
der services by which they become more or less accustomed 
to work, and some of them to kinds of work which will help 
them to become self-supporting when they are no longer 
maintained at the public expense. 

The only special appropriation for the school the current 
year was a sum not exceeding $1,000, for the purchase of 
machinery and for certain repairs in the laundry. A consid- 
erable part of this appropriation has been used for the 
purchase of two washing machines, designed to supply a 
lonsr-felt need. These machines were made by the A. M. 
Dolph Company of Cincinnati, Ohio. They were highly 
recommended by those who had given them a trial, and 
during the time they have been in operation at the school, 
have given entire satisfaction. The balance of the money 
will soon be expended in needed repairs on the laundry. 
The ice-house has been rebuilt during the past season and 
will require no further outlay for some time. 

The main building occupied by the school was erected in 
1853-4. It is constructed of wood, and, including wings, 
is some 478 feet long by 37 feet wide, and three and four 
stories high. Its capacity is ample for the accommodation of 
more than double the present population of the school, and 
greatly in excess of any probable future need. It is in a 
good state of repair, but having been constructed so long 
ago, and for a purpose so entirely different from that for 
which it is now used, it lacks adaptation for school purposes, 
even under the present system. Besides the fact that a large 
expense is being constantly incurred in the preservation of a 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 5 

building, the size of which greatly exceeds the demands of 
the school, is the farther fact that, owing to the age of the 
building, this expense is sure to be materially increased 
from year to year. 

Again, while every precaution is taken to guard against 
fire, it must be admitted, considering the nature of the ex- 
posures, and the limited force that could be made available 
in any emergency which is liable to arise, that the danger 
from this source is altogether too serious to be wholly over- 
looked. 

The system of school government which prevails at West- 
borough and at Lancaster, of dividing the schools into fam- 
ilies, each under a separate head, possesses such obvious 
advantages as to leave no reasonable doubt of the desirability 
of introducing it at this school. The age and condition of 
the children here, and the great benefit which they derive 
from the money annually appropriated for their care and 
training, always excite a deep interest in their welfare, and 
insure a liberal expenditure in their behalf. 

In view of these facts, the Trustees venture to suggest 
that the time has come when the wisdom and propriety of 
so arranging the present building, and constructing new 
ones, as to bring about an early reorganization of the school 
upon the basis referred to, is deserving of careful and seri- 
ous consideration . 

For the facts and statistics regarding the school, in detail, 
the Trustees respectfully refer to the accompanying reports 
of the Superintendent, Physician and other officers. 



PRDIAKY AXD EEFOKM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



LYMAX SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 



WESTBOROUGH. 



It is now two years since the old Reform School at West- 
borough was reorganized into the Lyman School, and estab- 
lished in its present quarters. The reorganization consisted 
in more than a change in location. The old congregate 

- m, with its rule of bolts and bars, was changed into the 
family system in open houses, and the age of admission 
limited at fifteen, instead of seventeen as previously. 

Three family houses were at first provided, but it was 
soon found that the numbers in the school were increasing, 
and that to properly maintain the family system another 
house was necessary. Accordingly in February the Trustees 
purchased with $3,000 of the Lyman fund the Willow Park 
estate, — an estate adjoining the farm, and consisting of 
three acre- of land and an old house. This house tempor- 
arily accommodated the overflow. In March the Legislature, 
that the whole property of the Lyman School might be 
owned by the Commonwealth, voted $7,000, — $3,000 to 
purchase the property from the Lyman fund, and $4,000 
to alter and repair the building. This $4,000 will not be 
quite enough, and a small appropriation will have to be 
asked to complete the alterations. The house promises, 
. to be substantial and convenient. 

The school now consists of a farm of ninety-nine acres, on 
b stand farm buildings and four houses, entirely apart 
from each other. A family consisting of master, mat ion, 
teacher, laundress, and about twenty-live hoy-, live in each 
house. Boys of separate families are allowed to have no 
intercourse. They work when out of door-, each family 



;._" PUBLIC DOCUMENT— Xo- 18. 7 

under the supervision of its own master ; and each house 

its own play-around. The V - . .- 
hour in school from half-past live to half-past six, 
breakfast, and work at housework, or on the farm, or in 

shops, from -even to half-past eleven. Dinner h ( reive. 

From one to half-pasl - ag in, then : . n for 

half an hour, and school from three to six. After that sup- 
per, recreation and prayers, and bed-time at eight o'clock. 
In winter they get up at half-past fiv ad of hve. Thus 

the division of the day is six hours for work, four for school, 
iive for meah and recreation, and nine for sleep. Th 
work is done entirely by the boys 3 doing little 

hut supervise : and the prevailing order and cleanliness, and 
the cheerful laces of the little workers, are always pleasant 

see. The boys are as efficient in the laundry 5 wing 

room as in the kitchen. During the year 108, 77£ 
have been washed and ironed, and 15, L6 _ nnents have 
been made in the - _ . m, besides much mending. 

Eight or nine boys are usually employed in this inside work ; 
they prefer it to outdoor work, and consider it a pla 
honor. But no boys are kept at inside work for more than 
three months. 

The farm work is no play done seriously . .ucation. 
Thirty acres are under cultivation, and besides the ord: 
work of hoeing, planting, caring fo] fctle, ~ ~:iere has 
been much work in making roads, digging fci aches, gi ling, 
etc. Where a year ago was a rough hillside are now good 
roads, pretty flower beds, and a generally tidy appearance. 
Much work has also been done by the fs o the ^VUlow 
Park house. The greater part of the pulling down was done 
by them. They have dug the cellar one and a half : - 
deeper, and Ailed it in with stone and gravel. They primed 
with paint the whole outside of the house. They dipped the 
shingles ( over 40, . carried and helped nail them on the 

roof: two boys helped the carpenters to lay the floors, and 
two others helped in the lathing. They have dug trenches 
for sewerage and water pipe- 1 i * feet long and from 
4 to 6 feet deep; and two boys have all summ r, usually 
without supervision, worked with oxen carting stone for the 
foundation of the avenues. 



8 PRIMAEY AND EEFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

It is good for the boys to be employed at such real nec- 
essary work, and there has been such a pressure of such 
work that less has been accomplished than the Trustees had 
hoped in the way of mechanical education. During the 
winter months the boys not employed in the house and barn 
work in the chair shop. The Trustees have wished to give 
instruction in other industries, especially carpentry, but the 
work of repairing and building has had to take precedence. 
Instruction in the carpenter shop will be begun this autumn, 
and the Superintendent plans to teach other industries, 
probably printing, tailoring and cobbling. In another year 
we shall hope to have done much in that direction. 

The schools (i. e., book instruction) are not graded, but 
arc on the family system. This necessarily makes them less 
efficient, but we believe that the evil of mixing boys from 
the separate families would be great. The boys are mostly 
rouah street lads, many of whom have been truants. Of 
those who have been in the school this year, 41 had not 
attended school within the year before their commitment, 27 
within two years and L 2 within three years; one had never 
attended school and eight could not read or write. It is 
difficult to teach from books children of such mental habits. 
They are more capable of being reached by industrial educa- 
tion, which also is a better training for the 1 work they are 
apl to do in after life. Accordingly the stress of education 
is laid on industrial and farm work, and on the moral acquire- 
ments of obedience, energy and truthfulness. We expect 
all the boys who leave us to know the three lis., and as 
much more as possible. lint the school-room is up-hill 
work, and the Trustees feel that they must submit to a lower 
standard there than they would expect in ordinary schools. 

As a whole the life on the farm is pleasant and free. There 
is no suggestion of restraint or of compulsion. The boys 
look happy and healthy, and they frequently volunteer the 
remark thai the school is a good place and they are glad they 
were senl there. The listless dogged faces which prevail in 
some institutions are unseen here. There is no serious 
trouble aboul runaways; it is found they can be trusted 
with their freedom to a quite unexpected degree. Indi- 
vidual boys are often t rusted about the grounds alone, and 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 9 

sometimes squads of boys work without supervision. There 
is a smaller proportion of runaways than in the old days 
of bolts and cells. During the year only five boys have been 
lost in that way, though a number of others have escaped 
and been caught, and three have voluntarily returned. 

The officers as a rule feel a real interest in and often affec- 
tion for their charges. One master writes and receives letters 
almost once a month from as many as eight boys, and writes 
occasionally to a number of others. On winter evenings the 
family collects in the play-room and the master or matron 
reads aloud or plays games with the boys. The Trustees 
feel that the main hope of reformation rests with the officers, 
and they try to maintain the standard that an officer should 
have such faith in his work that he shall be disappointed at 
each failure. The Superintendent well exemplifies this 
standard. He writes as much as once in six months to every 
boy who goes out from the school, and oftener to boys who 
answer. Two boys write about once a month ; one in a 
recent letter spoke of the many letters he had received from 
the. officers, and of the help they had been to him. The 
Superintendent has co-operated heartily with the Trustees 
in inaugurating the new system, and has served the best 
interests of the school with untiring zeal. 

It is not found difficult to secure good conduct in the 
school. The chief punishment is marks. It is really sur- 
prising how much can be accomplished by slight punish- 
ments and firmness. Whipping and imprisonment* in the 
punishment room are resorted to only for grave offences, — 
for running away, or for gross impertinence or indecency. 
Whippings are always administered in the presence of the 
Superintendent, and both whippings and imprisonments are 
recorded in the punishment book at the office. Imprison- 
ments often last only a few hours, and the longest time has 
been fifty-four hours. During the whole year there have 
been but 33 whippings and 57 imprisonments ; certainly a 
very small number for a school which has averaged 104 
inmates. 

The boys are sentenced to the school for their minority ; 

* The punishment room is well aired and lighted. 



10 PRIMARY AXD REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

but after a year or eighteen months it is expected that they 
will be fit to go out on probation. There are plenty of ap- 
plications from farmers for Lyman School boys, but there 
are too few places offering where we feel that our boys will 
receive the care and consideration which they need. If, 
when the school influences are removed, no other good per- 
sonal influences can be substituted, the lessons of the school 
will too often be quickly unlearnt. Owing to the disuse of 
the apprentice system, places can seldom be found for boys 
who wish to learn a trade, unless they go home. Therefore, 
though on general principles the policy of the Trustees is 
when placing out to remove boys from their old temptations, 
as a matter of fact, whenever the boy's home is a decent one, 
he is generally allowed to go to it. But in each case of 
release on probation to the home, the report on the home by 
the State agent is submitted to the Trustees, and they con- 
sult the Superintendent as to the character and tendencies 
of the boy. 

The number of boys this year released was . . 73 

Of these there were — 

Senl to places other than their homes, ... 42 

Allowed to £0 home 31 



Of the \-l placed out 



73 



There have been rel urned, ..... 13 

Run away, ......... 8 

Done well (or, at least, kepi their places), . . 21 

42 

It is not possible to ascertain accurately the conducl of 
those who have gone home. Only three have been returned, 
hut parents do not return as employers do, and the police 
only re-arrest for offences againsl the law. 

If the Visiting Agency could provide for more frequenl 
visiting of the boys out on probation, it would remove one 
difficulty; bid the ground to be covered is large, and visiting 
to be fully effective musl be more frequenl than is really 
practicable from paid agents. 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT 

There were — 



No. 18. 



11 



i the School, Sept. 30, 1886, . 






90 


New commitments, .... 




93 




Recommitted, 




1 




Returned from places, 


. 14 






" by police, .... 


7 






" by parents, .... 


4: 






" voluntarily, .... 


4 






by State Board, . 


1 








— 


30 











124 


Total in the School during the year, 






214 



The disposition of these boys is as follows : — 



In the School, Sept. 30, 1887, . 




On probation to parents, 


. 35 


" to others, 


. 45 


Discharged to U. S. Navy,. . 


2 


" to Mass. Reformatory, 


3 


to State Workhous \ . 


1 


" to leave the State, 


1 


Runaway (4 returned) , 


9 


Total, 





118 



96 



214> 



It will be observed that there were 28 more boys in the 
school at the end of the year than at the beginning. This is 
due to the increased number of commitments. As the 
Lyman School is commending itself to the approval of the 
public, a larger number of juvenile offenders are being sen- 
tenced by the courts to Westborough. The officers who 
bring in the boys often remark that the disposition to send 
boys there is increasing. It was to meet this increase that 
Willow Park was bought. The four houses are already over- 
crowded, for as the number in a family rises above twenty- 
five the bad effects are quickly seen. If the increase in 
commitments continues, a new house must before long be 
provided. 

As regards the boys in the school, the new system may 
be considered an entire success. It is too soon to follow them 
during their years of probation or in after life. A most sin- 
cere belief in the importance of the work might co-exist with 



* This represents 193 individuals 



12 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

a very moderate expectation of success. It must be remem- 
bered that we deal with "bad material ; most of the boys are 
worse than vicious, — they are weak, and some are really 
below par mentally. 

Of the 193 boys who have this year been in the school : — 

93 were born of parents one or both of whom were intemperate. 
39 belong to families other members of which have been arrested. 
90 have been themselves arrested before or in other institutions. 

" How can a man escape from his ancestors" is the prob- 
lem the Lyman School is trying to solve. Education can do 
much; but these boys come to us at from 11 to 15 years 
old, too often with a bad education having been added to a 
bad inheritance. Something wo can do to check evil dispo- 
sitions through disuse and disapprobation : something by 
teaching by sharp consequences the inexpediency (and, if 
possible, the essential evil) of wrong doing; something to 
develop latent powers and form good habits ; and something 
by starting the boy in the world again removed from vicious 
surroundings and exceptional temptations. But when all is 
said and done, we must expect only slow growth, not revolu- 
tion. Natural processes are gradual, and work through long 
generations. In the individual life, nature is stronger than 
nurture; but in the race, nurture is stronger than nature. 
Thus we must work in the faith that we build not for to-day 
but for the ages, and not let many failures discourage our 
belief in the possibility and the necessity of this work. 

The Trustees look forward to improvements in their 
methods, especially in industrial education; hut they view 
the present condition of the school with satisfaction, and 
consider its tendencies to be enlightened and progressive. 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18. 13 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 

LANCASTER. 



The Industrial School has cost the State this year $11,- 
167. 94 for its current expenses, and 87,245. si for salaries 
and wages, making a total of $18,413.75.* The net cost is 
not much less than the gross cost, because only a small 
amount was returned to the State treasury from the sale 
of farm produce, and nothing from so-called "Industries." 
The one aim and object of this school is to prepare the 
girls to become, as soon as possible, self-supporting; first, 
by housework in private families; later, whenever their 
characters become established, by any worthy occupation 
they may choose. After a year, more or less, in the school, 
a girl will be placed out on trial, provided she has not for- 
feited the privilege by unsatisfactory conduct. If she stays 
out and continues to behave well, the State will thence- 
forward be relieved of her support. Even if she is returned 
to the school and placed again, several times, she is likely 
to form more self-reliant habits than by a continuous stay in 
an institution. If her conduct while on probation is such 
as to make close restraint necessary for her safe keeping, or 
such as to show that she does not intend to lead a decent 
life, the commissioners of prisons will be petitioned for her 
transfer to Sherborn Prison. 

* The greater expenditure this year has been for solid improvements. Better 
stock was needed for farm work as well as for a fair supply of milk. The appraisal 
will show an increase in value in horses and cows ; also in dry -goods and ready- 
made clothing. The old and soiled cotton comforters have been replaced by woollen 
blankets, which can be kept fresh and clean. The transportation and outfits of one 
hundred and two girls, most of whom were sent to places in the country, are no 
small items. 



14 PEIMARY AND EEFOEM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

While the average number in the school this year has been 
only 67 t 8 q 7 q per cent., there have been nearly double that 
number supporting themselves, mostly by housework, out- 
side. Suppose all these who are still in the custody of the 
school should be retained there during minority, and 
employed at contract or piecework while their board and 
clothing were furnished by the State, the per capita cost 
would stand at a much lower figure than now ($5.21 a 
week), but the actual cost to the community would be 
greater. Ninety-three are supplying an unfailing demand 
for help in housework, especially in our country towns ; 
while for the time being, at least, they are off the list of 
recipients of State charity. The thorough outfit provided 
for them when they take their first place, secures for them 
a fair start in life, and enables them, in most instances, to 
comply with the rule that they shall deposit a quarter of 
their very moderate wages in the hands of the Treasurer of 
Trust Funds, to be put at interest against the time when the 
girl is discharged or married ; and it will be seen by the 
Treasurer's report that the quarter of their earnings sent 
him for deposit this year lias amounted to over $1,000. 
Some of the auxiliary visitors have shown much energy in 
collecting for the Treasurer the quarter of the girls' wages, 
and inducing them to make the remaining three-quarters 
suffice for their clothing. 

The labor of the girls in the school also has its apprecia- 
ble value, for in addition to the housework and sewing, the 
whitewashing, painting, papering and upholstering,* they 
have accomplished an unusally large amount of work upon 
the farm and vegetable garden. During harvest time alone 
the girls cut over ninety tons of standing corn and prepared 
it for the chopper ; they have done more than half the work 
of raising thirty tons of beets, and have gathered several 
tons of leaves in and about the grounds and woods to be 
used for farm use. 

* The old and much-worn hard pine floors of the halls, school-rooms, sewing-rooms 
and laundries have been both cleansed and polished by the application of beeswax 
dissolved in turpentine, at which the girls have become quite skilful; by renewing 
this three or four times per year, and by a daily rubbing with dry cloth or hard 
brush, the wet scrubbing has been dispensed with, thus doing away with the "insti- 
tution smell" which is so apt to hang about the water-soaked boards of an old 
building. 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 15 

This out of door exercise has, at the same time, added to 
their stock of health and strength, and there is a noticeable 
alacrity about their more varied industrial work, while at 
the same time there has been a decided diminution in the 
number and degree of punishments. Quarrelsome or imper- 
tinent girls are sent to their rooms to remain by themselves 
for a few hours or days, but longer restraint has seldom been 
found necessary, except for girls returned for bad conduct. 
A few decide that they " can't be good," but most of them 
are learning self-control by their efforts to win a place upon 
the roll of honor. The Superintendent has patiently striven 
to interest the house officers to carry out the system described 
above, and in many cases has been able to recognize marked 
improvement, while in others she has had to suffer keenly 
from the ingratitude of girls whose fair promises were 
broken as soon as temptation presented itself. A few had 
evidently planned a return to an evil life. The Superintend- 
ent would gladly follow each one into her new home, visit 
her and correspond with her ; but since this is not possible, 
she devotes her energy and her strong practical sense to 
making the work of the school effective, and impresses upon 
the girls the importance of preparing themselves to become 
self-supporting, without a moment's anxiety as to whether 
the school will diminish too fast upon her hands. The 
following tables may interest those who care for statistics : — 

During this year there have been within the school for more or 

less time, 152 

In the school Sept. 30, 1886, 70 

Returned to the school, having been placed out in former 

years, "... 44 

New commitments, ........ 38 

— 152 

The following disposition was made of these girls : — 

In the school Sept. 30, 1886, 58 

In place, 57 

With friends, behaving well, ....... 5 

" " behavior doubtful, 1 

Married, 5 

Almshouse, or at board, 2 

Reformatory Prison for Women (one committed by court), . 4 

Runaway, . . . 11 



1() 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Discharged, ......... 

Died, : 

Of age, 

Total, 

During the year there have been sent out from the school 

There have been returned (including the 44 from former 
years 1 placing), ...... 

for illness, ........ 

" change of place, 

" a visit (during absence of employer), 
" unsatisfactory conduct, 

" theft, 

" other bad conduct, 



5 
1 
3 
— 152 

112 



13 
16 

2 
26 

3 
12 



Whole number who have been in custody of the school dur- 
ing the year, .......... 

Of whom there have attained their majority, . . . .24 

Discharged by vote for good conduct, ..... 5 

" nearly 2L years of age, ..... 4 

" as unfit subjects for the school, .... 4 

Died, 1 

Total who have come of age, been discharged, or died, . — 

Remaining in the Industrial School, ..... 58 
At work in families, . . . . . . . .91 

With friends, 19 

Married in former years, not yet 21, . . . . .11 
Married this year, ......... 14 

At board or in almshouses, 3 

In State Primary School, 1 

In prison former years, and not yet of age, .... 5 

Sent to prison this year, ........ 4 

Runaway former years and not recovered, . . . .16 

Runaway former years, said to be doing well, ... 1 

Runaway this year, 12 

Total in custody Sept. 30, 1887, — 

Of these there may be said to be behaving well outside, . 122 

Doubtful, 14 

Badly, 41 

177 

In the school, returned, . . . . . . 23 

In the school all this year and not yet placed out, ... 8 
Committed during the year and remaining, . . . .27 



58 235 



Of the above there have been sent out once, . . .85 

" ' " " " twice, . . .15 

" " " " three times, . .11 

" " " " four times, . . 1 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 17 

It will be noticed that the salaries have been increased by 
the addition of $50 for each of the housekeepers, who now 
receive an equal amount with the school teachers, i. e., $300 
per annum. The object of making this change is to secure 
more intelligent instruction in the cooking department. It 
is unquestionably an easier task for the housekeeper to make 
the more complicated dishes with her own hands, while the 
girls peel potatoes, cut up onions and wash the kettles and 
pans. When the Trustees have, from time to time, urged 
the necessity for training the girls to prepare the whole 
meal, they have been met with the objection that material 
would be wasted and dinner spoiled, to the great discomfort 
of the household. Meantime, complaints too often come 
from employers that their material is wasted and their dinner 
spoiled by girls whose training had been limited to that of a 
kitchen maid without including responsible cooking. It is 
so well recognized that intelligent handwork developes the 
brain power as well as the muscles, — that the scholar becomes 
interested in work that calls for skill, and not for mere drudg- 
ery, — that the Trustees are convinced of the importance of 
securing the services of instructors who will give occa- 
sional object lessons, and then allow the scholar, awkward or 
undisciplined as she may be, to mix and cook and take the 
risk of spoiling the dish for once. Such an instructor must 
be a proficient not only in the art of cooking but also in 
that of teaching, and her work is worth $300 per year. The 
following is a specimen of the daily reports sent in by the 
several housekeepers : — 

HOUSEKEEPER'S BLANKS FOR DAILY RECORD. 

State Industrial School, Lancaster, Oct. 8, 1887. 
How many girls have been under your charge? — Four. 
Report the names of those who have lost marks, also the names of 
those who have been reported to the Matron, and for what reasons. 

Report the names of those who are learning to cook, and with what 

success ; also those who succeed in personal neatness when in the kitchen. 

C. C. made pies, apple and custard ; baked beans, brown bread and 

white bread. 
E. K. made rice pudding and prepared ladies' dinner, nearly alone. 
M. McD. canned four cans of fruit. 

(Signed) J. N. McIntyke, Housekeeper. 

Please fill out this blank at the close of each day, and send it to the office hefore eisht 
o clock on the following morning. L . L , BliACKEXT, Supt 



18 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Since the discussion several years ago with regard to the 
most desirable limit to the age for commitment to this 
school, three lists have been compared showing the follow- 
ing results : — 

Of 140 girls who were committed to the school during 
two years and a half ending Sept. 30, 1886, 91 were com- 
mitted when under sixteen years of age. Of these, GO per 
cent, have behaved well or fairly well ; 20 per cent, have 
behaved badly ; while 20 per cent, cannot yet be counted on 
either list. Of those committed when over sixteen years of 
age a much smaller proportion has proved satisfactory, but 
it should be remembered that seventeen of these had first been 
placed on probation under the best influences that the State 
Board could provide for them, and were transferred to the 
school because- they had proved to be unmanageable in priv- 
ate families. Of these, 44 per cent, are behaving well ; 50 
per cent, badly ; 6 per cent, not counted. Of those who 
were committed directly from the courts when over sixteen 
years of age a larger proportion is doing well (48 per 
cent.), and a smaller proportion badly (26 per cent.) ; 26 
per cent, not counted on either list. 

While only one quarter of these last mentioned are to be 
considered failures, the trustees would not exclude girls of 
sixteen from the school, and recommend no change in the law ; 
nor do they ask to have any one committed to the school 
who can be removed from temptation and cared for in a good 
private family. They do earnestly protest against the policy 
of allowing a girl, who is found to be in danger, to remain 
on probation in her home, within reach of the allurements of 
bad companions or among the hiding places of our large 
cities. The present careful classification within the school, 
and the seclusion of each family, has so nearly done away 
with the danger of contamination there, that we find by ana- 
lyzing these lists that the sixteen girls committed for stubborn- 
ness or larceny, and not known to have been guilty of any 
other offence, have passed through the school without injury, 
and with marked benefit, and with one exception have been 
free from immorality since leaving. 

The provision allowing the discharge of unfit subjects to 
parents or guardians has relieved the Industrial School of 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 19 

certain feeble-minded girls, but the burden has fallen upon 
the town or state almshouses ; and in one instance the court 
would doubtless have recommitted the girl had not the State 
agent advised to the contrary. A committee of the Trustees 
was appointed to consult with the State Board of Lunacy 
and Charity, and by invitation of the latter a conference 
was held at which the Trustees of the Massachusetts School 
for the Feeble-Minded were also present to hear Mrs. 
Lowell's statement as to the provision made for this class in 
New York State, an account of which will doubtless be 
given in full in the report of the State Board, and is there- 
fore omitted here. The necessity for such provision was 
set forth by the Trustees of the Massachusetts School for 
the Feeble-Minded in their report of 1885, in the following 
words : "In these reports the Trustees have frequently 
called attention to the necessity for making provision for 
the protection of adult female idiots. The danger of their 
becoming the victims of the lust of profligate men is too 
apparent to require more than mere mention. Not only 
should the imbecile woman be protected for her own sake, 
but we must guard against the curse of her offspring. Idiocy 
and imbecility depend to a large degree upon hereditary and 
pre-natal causes." 

A special appropriation of $7,000 for furnaces and water 
supply at the State Industrial School was granted by the last 
Legislature, and approved by His Excellency the Governor 
on June 8, 1887. The furnaces are nearly ready, but the 
work upon the water supply has been delayed in order to 
expend the money in the wisest manner. After consultation 
with three engineers, it has been decided to attach the new 
water-pipes to the reservoir as it stands, and thus test the 
capacity of the spring which supplies it, without enlarging 
the reservoir. The more pressing demand for the present 
moment is that for renewal of the water-pipes in the family 
houses, which must be done before connecting these houses 
with the new system of supply-pipes. The Sta,te Board of 
Lunacy and Charity, as well as the State Board of Health, 
have agreed in condemning the sanitary condition of both the 
cottage and farmhouse, and in recommending better water- 
closets and plumbing in all the houses. The work upon the 



20 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

cottage can be postponed for the present, but any increase 
in the number of inmates will make it necessary to have that 
building available also. The plumbing of the three brick 
houses will be begun without further delay, and continued 
until the appropriation is exhausted. An additional appro- 
priation will be respectfully requested to complete these very 
necessary sanitary improvements. 

Very respectfully submitted by the Trustees, 

M. H. WALKER, Westborough, President. 
SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, Worcester, Treasurer. 
ELIZABETH C. PUTNAM, Boston, Secretary. 
MILO HILDRETH, Northborough. 
ELIZABETH O. EVANS, Boston. 
JAMES J. O'CONNOR, Holyoke. 
CHARLES L. GARDNER, Palmer. 

Sept. 30, 1837 



1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



21 



TEUST FUNDS OF LYMAN SCHOOL. 



TREASURER'S ACCOUNT. 

Lyman Fund. 

Samuel R. Heywood, Treasurer, in Account with Income of Lyman 

Fund. 



188G. 

Sept. 27. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



1. 

1. 
1. 

6. 

30. 
30. 

1887. 

Jan. 1. 
3. 

31. 
31. 
March 31. 
31. 
31. 

2. 

2. 

5. 
19. 
20. 
31. 
31. 

1. 



April 
May 



July 



Aug. 1. 
Sept. 15. 

28. 
30. 
30. 



Dr. 

Balance brought forward, . 
Interest on note town Marlborough, . 
Dividend Boston & Albany R. R. stock, 
Dividend Citizens National Bank, 
Interest on note town Northbo rough, . 
Cash drawn from Peoples Savings Bank, 
Borrowed of Central National Bank, . 

Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., 

Dividend Fitchburg R. R., . 

Interest B. & A. R. R. bonds, 

Rent Willow Park estate one month, . 

Dividend B. & A. R. R., 

Interest note town Marlborough, 

Dividend Citizens National Bank, 

Rent YVillow Park estate two months, 

Rent Willow Park estate one month, . 

Dividend Fitchburg R. R., . 

Interest note town Northborough, 

Interest Old Colony R. R. bonds, 

Rent Willow Park estate one month, . 

State Massachusetts for Willow Park estate 

Dividend B. & A. R. R., 

Return insurance premium Willow Park estate 

Interest B. & A. R. R. bonds, 

Interest Central National Bank, . 

Interest town Marlborough note, 

Dividend B. & A. R. R., . 

Interest O. C. R. R. bond, . 



$651 


22 


206 


25 


220 00 


120 


00 


30 


00 


1,080 


80 


1,115 00 


228 


00 


207 


00 


70 


00 


25 


00 


228 00 


208 


25 


120 00 


50 00 


25 


00 


138 


00 


30 00 


30 


00 


25 


00 


3,000 00 


228 


00 


10 


50 


70 


00 


29 


90 


206 


25 


228 


00 


30 


00 



,588 17 



22 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Paid by order of Trustees. 



188d 


. 


Oct. 


25 


Nov. 


/% 




8 




26 




30 




30 




30 


I8S7 




Jan. 


4. 


Feb. 


22. 




2 2 


April 


2. 




20 


May 


6 


June 


28 


Aug. 


11 


Sept. 


29 




00 



Cr. 
Ten rights B. & A. R. R., . 
II. E. Swan, expenses to Lancaster, O., 
G. A. dough, architect, . . . . 
Postage, ....... 

E. T. Harrington, for Willow Park estate, 
Examining title for Willow Park estate, . 
Recording deed for Willow Park estate, . 

Central National Bank, .... 

J. W. Fairbanks, insurance on Willow Park 

buildings, ....... 

Safe Deposit and Trust Company, 
Central National Bank, .... 

Cutting & Bishop, on account Lyman School 

buildings, 

Central National Bank, .... 

II . E. Swan, Superintendent, celebration Fourth 

July, 

F. J. Barnard, making deed Willow Park estate 

Postage, 

Balance forward to new account, 



$65 50 

76 98 

250 00 

3 00 

3,000 00 

3 00 

70 

400 00 



30 


00 


15 


oo 


600 00 


89 


00 


129 


;>7 


25 


00 


5 


75 


2 


00 


3,892 


<;? 



$8,588 17 



Sept. 30, 18S7. 
Examined and approved 



SAMUEL R. IIEYWOOD, 

Treasurer. 



M. H. Walkeh. 

MlLO HlLDUETH. 



Mary Lamb Fund, Lyman School. 

Samuel R. Heywood, Treasurer, in Account with Income of Mary 

Lamb Fund. 



Sept. 


27 


Nov. 


11 


188; 




Jan. 


1 


April 


2 




21 




20 


July 


1 



Sept. 30. 



Dr. 
Balance brought forward, . 
Drawn from Peoples Savings Bank, 

Dividend B. & A. R. R., 
Dividend B. & A. R. R, 
Drawn from Peoples Savings Bank, 
Drawn from Peoples Savings Bank, 
Dividend B. & A. R. R., 
Dividend B. & A. R. R., 





$322 20 




1,000 00 




10 00 




10 00 




100 00 




225 00 




10 00 




10 00 



$1,687 20 



174 


77 


o 
O 


25 


252 


00 


31 


93 


$1,687 20 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 23 



Paid by order of Trustees. 

188G. CR. 

Nov. 10. Five shares B. & A. R. R. stock, .... $981 25 

18. Jacob Manning, for trees, 214 00 

Dec. 17. II. E. Swan, Superintendent, Christmas festi- 
vities, 30 00 

1887. 

April 20. F. G. Leet, on account chapel, 

20. Stationery and postage stamps, . 

27. S. G. Chickering & Co., piano for chapel, . 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, 



SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, 

Treasurer. 
Sept. 30, 1887. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 

Inventory of Lyman School Investments, Lyman Fund. 

1887. Par value. Market value. 

Sept. 30. 114 shares B. & A. R. R., . . $11,400 00 $22,686 00 

92 shares Fitehburg R. R., . . 9,200 00 8,924 00 
Two $1,000, 7 per cent. B. & A. R. 

R. bonds, 2,000 00 2,200 00 

One $1,000, 6 per cent. O. C. R. R. 

bonds, 1,000 00 1,120 00 

Note town Northborough, . . 1,500 00 1,500 00 

Note town Marlborough, . . 10,000 00 10,000 00 

40 shares Citizens National Bank, 4,000 00 4,500 00 

Cash in Central National Bank, . 3,892 67 3,892 67 

Mary Lamb Fund. 

5 shares B. & A. R. R., . . . 500 00 995 00 

Peoples Savings Bank, deposit, . 414 65 

SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, 
Treasurer. 
Sept. 30, 1S87. 
Examined and found correct : M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 



24 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



TEUST FUND STATE INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL. 



TREASURER'S ACCOUNT. 

Samuel R. Heywood, Treasurer, in Account with Income op Mary 
Lamb Fund of Industrial School. 
Dr. 
Balance brought forward, . . . . . $6 43 
Dividend on 13 shares Boston National Bank, . 39 00 

Dividend on 13 shares Boston National Bank, . 39 00 
Interest from Central National Bank, ... 5 10 



1886 




Sept. 


27. 


Oct. 


1. 


1887 




March 31. 


Sept. 


15. 



1886 




Nov. 


5. 


Dec. 


18. 


1887 




Feb. 


17. 


April 


20. 


June 


28. 



Paid by order of Trustees. 
Cr. 
Mrs. C. S. Crouch, magic scale and books, 
Superintendent Christmas festivities, 

J. E. Pratt, M.D., medical advice A. M. S., 
J. M. Combs, M.D., medical advice N. M., 
Superintendent celebrating Fourth of July, 



$89 53 



25 00 


10 


50 


21 


00 


20 


00 



|89 53 



SAMUEL B. HEYWOOD, 

Treasurer, 
Sept. 30, 18S7. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDKETH. 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 25 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL TRUST FUND. 



Samuel R. Heywood, Treasurer, in Account with Industrial School 

Trust Fund. 

188G. Dr. 
Sept. 30. Balance brought forward, $59 05 

1887. 

Jan. 28. Drawn from Peoples Savings Bank, M. A. S., . 5 00 

Aug. 8. Drawn from Peoples Savings Bank, M. A. S., . 12 00 



$76 05 



Paid by order of Trustees. 

1886. Cr. 

Nov. 5. W. O. Johnson, dentistry for sundry girls, . . $27 00 

1887. 

Jan. 26. M. A. S., 5 00 

Aug. 8. M. A. S., 12 00 

Sept. 3. Mrs. L. L. Brackett, dentistry for sundry girls, . 32 05 



$76 05 

SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, 

Treasurer. 
Sept. 30, 1887. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 
Milo Hildreth. 

Fay Fund. 

1887. Dr. 

Sept. 15. Interest from Chelsea Savings Bank, . . . $40 40 

Cr. 
Sept. 16. For highest grade deportment to eight girls, $5.05 

each, 40 40 

SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, 

Treasurer. 
Sept. 30, 1887. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walker. 
Milo Hildreth. 



26 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. '87. 



Inventory of Industrial School Investments, Mary Lamb Fund. 

1887. Par value. Market value. 

Sept. 30. 13 shares Boston National Bank, . $1,300 00 $1,612 00 



Fay Fund. 

1887. 

Sept. 30. Deposit in Chelsea Savings Bank, .... $1,000 00 

SAMUEL K. HEYWOOD, 
Treasurer. 

Sept. 30, 1887. 
Examined and found correct : M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDKETH. 



Rogers Fund. 

1887. 

Sept. 30. One bond State of Maine 6 per cent, in custody of 

State Treasurer, $1,000 00 

1887. 

Sept. 30. Cash received from Superintendent and others for 
deposit to credit of sundry girls from Get. 1, 
1886, to Sept. 27, 1887, $1,036 97 

By deposit in savings bank on account of sundry 

girls, 1,036 97 

Cash drawn from savings banks on account of 

sundry girls, from Oct. 1, 1886, to Sept. 27, 1887, 900 17 

By paid sundry amounts drawn from savings 

banks, 900 17 

Memorandum of Savings Bank Deposits for Girls. 

1887. 

Sept. 30. 102 depositors in Westborough Savings Bank, . $1,812 55 

3 depositors in Clinton Savings Bank, . . 29 70 

1 depositor in Peoples Savings Bank, . . 14 50- 

27 depositors in Boston Five Cents Savings Bank, 374 43 

$2,231 18 

SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, 

Treasurer. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL 



MONSOK 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools : 

I have the honor to submit for your consideration the 
annual report of the condition of the State Primary School, 
for the year ending Sept. 30, 1887. 

It will be seen by a reference to the table marked " E," 
in the following tabular statements, that there has been ex- 
pended during the year for all purposes, including repairs, 
ordinary and extraordinary, the sum of forty-eight thousand 
four hundred twenty-five dollars and forty-eight cents ($48,- 
425.48) . This does not include the amount paid for boarding 
out children, nor the amount expended for special repairs. 
Under the head of ordinary repairs is included the slating 
of a portion of the hospital roof, the relaying of several 
floors, the painting of the chapel, the boys' basement and a 
portion of the barns. The extraordinary repairs have been 
the finishing of the cellar, under the straw barn, for the stor- 
ing of vegetables, at a cost of one hundred eighty-two dollars 
and thirty cents ($182.30) ; the moving and thorough re- 
pairing of the ice house, at a cost of five hundred fifteen 
dollars and fifty-three cents ($515.53) ; the laying of some 
new walks, and the repairing of those already laid, at a cost 
of one hundred thirty-four dollars ($134). These figures 
do not include the work of the teams or of the farmer and 
his assistants. The new gas machine was in operation a year 
ago, but payment for the same was not made until February 
of this year. An allowance of twenty-five dollars was made 
for the old machine, leaving eleven hundred fifty dollars 
($1,150) to be paid the Gilbert & Barker Manufacturing 
Company. This amount is included in the expenses for 



30 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

extraordinary repairs, although the work was done last year. 
All of these things seemed to be real improvements when 
they were made, and experience has proved them to be so. 
In addition to these repairs, the expenses for which have 
been met from the regular appropriation, two new washing- 
machines made by the A. M. Dolph Company of Cincinnati, 
have been put in the laundry, and other repairs have been 
made therein, all at an expense of eight hundred forty-one 
dollars and thirty-three cents ($841.33). This expenditure 
has been from a special appropriation of one thousand 
dollars ($1,000), made for the purpose of repairs in the 
laundry. I am happy to say that these machines are doing 
the work for which they were designed very satisfactory v. 

The number of persons as pupils or inmates Oct. 1, 1886, 
was 368. The admissions for the year have been 240. The 
number placed out on board or on trial has been greater 
than during the previous year, and has reached as high a 
figure as 220. The number of discharges during the year 
has been 48, while 17 have been removed to other institu- 
tions, 6 have died and 1 has eloped and not returned, leaving 
316 as the number now in the institution. The greatest 
number during the year was in its beginning, when there 
were 370. The least number was in July, when there were 
289. The average number for the year has been 332. This 
is a smaller average than during any previous year. As a 
consequence, all have had greater freedom, and the officers 
and teachers have been enabled to do more for those under 
their care. These children come as neglected, dependent, 
or are rescued from possible evils at the courts. Many of 
these are not cases needing punishment so much as restraint. 
Most of them accept the situation without complaining, and 
try to make such use of their opportunities as will better 
prepare them for the duties of life when the school gives up 
its hold. I have observed several cases where there has been 
a complete change for the better, apparently, in the child's life, 
after a few months' residence here. It is not so, however, 
with all. A few are placed out, after a comparatively good 
course here, who show after a few weeks of service that they 
have not given up the bad ways into which they had fallen 
before coming here. The school must receive such addition 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 31 

to its numbers again for a period, and then they pass on 
to another trial, which too often results in a second failure. 

No applicant is permitted to take a child on trial or to 
board until an investigation of the home and surroundings 
of the applicant shall be made by a designated agent of the 
Board of Lunacy and Charity. In this way most of the 
children are placed in good homes, where they are well 
treated. I fear, however, that in some cases too little atten- 
tion is given to the education of the children thus placed 
out, and their usefulness in the future very much impaired 
as a consequence. There are now 33 children out on board. 
These all seem to be in good families and are doing well. 

The school-room work for the year has been well done, 
and the teachers are deserving of commendation for the 
earnestness and zeal shown in the prosecution of their work. 
Some changes have been made during the year, and some 
substitutions, also, have been made because of needed rest. 
A great majority of the pupils have been attentive to their 
studies, and have made good progress. The removal of 
most of the feeble-minded from the school has been accom- 
plished, and a better standing has been reached in the lower 
classes as a consequence. I refer you to the report of the 
Principal for a fuller and more detailed statement of the 
work in the school-rooms. 

The work done by the children on the farm and in 
the institution has been considerable. Statements "H" 
and " I," forming a part of this report, show what has 
been done in the sewing-rooms. The work done in other 
departments is of equal importance, and if it could be 
enumerated would show that all had done well. State- 
ment "K" shows how many children are now employed. 
This number is considerably short of the whole, but it 
must be borne in mind that there are many little ones and 
some diseased ones who are unfitted for work. 

The general health of the inmates is good. The hospital 
records show that the number of admissions to the hospital 
during the year has been much greater than during the pre- 
vious year. Cases of severe sickness have not been very 
numerous, except during the winter, when scarlet fever and 
diphtheria prevailed, but many individuals have been treated 



32 PEIMAEY AND EEFOEM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

for sliglit ailments, which might have proved serious except 
for their early treatment. We have great cause for gratitude 
to our Heavenly Father that the number of deaths has been 
so small, and that disease which stood over us so threaten- 
ingly in December was abated with so little loss of life. I 
refer you to the report of the Physician, giving additional 
information of interest and value concerning the mortuary 
and health record for the year. 

The harvest of crops from the farm has been quite satisfac- 
tory. The hay crop is a little larger than last year, and much 
of it was gathered under cloudy skies and threatening weather. 
Most of it, however, was in good condition when it was 
gathered. The growth of fodder corn was great, and the 
amount required to fill the silo was grown on less than eight 
acres of ground. The potato crop was also great, but so 
many have decayed that the amount gathered will not be 
more than half enough for our needs. Other vegetables, not 
yet gathered, promise well. The farm is in good condition 
and ought to yield an abundant harvest for years to come 
with ordinary care. This condition is due, in a large meas- 
ure, to the care bestowed by Mr. George Fishercleck, who 
has had its management for so many years. He retired to a 
less active life last April, and Mr. Walter H. Williams was 
appointed as his successor. Some work has been done in 
the way of repairs on the stone-wall fences, but much more 
needs to be done. The stock of cattle on the farm has been 
improved by the introduction of more grade Holsteins. The 
annual exhibit at the Eastern Hampden Agricultural Fair 
was such as to receive the commendation of prominent agri- 
culturists who were present. 

No material changes have been made in the plan of 
work for the year. In all that has been done, the thought 
as to what was best has been uppermost. It would be 
strange if somethino; were not left undone that ought to 
have been done. Efforts have been made to teach the 
children to love the good and hate the evil, — to be honest 
and faithful in all things. They have been urged to break 
away from habits of vice and form habits of truth and virtue. 
If we have turned only a few into the right path, and made 
the many comfortable, our labor has not been wholly lost. 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 33 

We hope the good seed sown may bear fruit in abundance 
in the years to come. The children have found enjoyment 
in the freedom afforded them, and we have found pleasure in 
their enjoyment. The future is full of hope and encourage- 
ment, because we are dealing with youthful minds ; to that 
future we are now to bend our energies. We shall need 
persistence and patience. We shall need our annual appro- 
priation in due time, and I hope it may not be lessened 
because of our diminished numbers. The school-room work 
may be made more effective if there is a fuller supply of 
outline maps and a few simple reference books. The books 
in the children's library are many of them very much worn, 
and new ones are needed if we would keep the library in 
good condition. The buildings are needing frequent repairs, 
and those that have not been painted this year will need 
painting in the year to come. I trust these things will not 
be forgotten when the annual appropriation is considered. 

I have to thank the Hospital Newspaper Society of Boston , 
and other friends, for books, magazines and papers ; various 
persons for sundry articles ; the teachers and officers for 
their faithfulness and interest in the work ; you, as individu- 
als and trustees for help and counsel ; and an overruling 
Providence for the blessings so abundantly bestowed in the 
past. 

Respectfully submitted, 



October 1, 1887. 



AMOS ANDREWS, 

Superintendent . 



34 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. ["Oct, 



Statement A. 

Summary of Admissions and Discharges. 



Boys. 


Girls. 


Women. 


Totals. 


Present Oct. 1, 1886, . . . 


258 


99 


11 


368 


Received from State Almshouse at Tewks- 










bury, . . . ^ . 


36 


28 


12 


76 


Received from Superintendent Indoor 










Poor, as juvenile offenders, 


32 


2 


_ 


34 


Received from Superintendent Indoor 










Poor, as neglected children, . 


11 


12 


_■ 


23 


Received from Superintendent Indoor 










Poor, as dependent, 


5 


3 


1 


9 


Received from Bridgewater, 


5 


_ 


- 


5 


Returned, placed out in previous years, 


8-1 


12 


- 


46 


Returned, having been placed out since 










Sept. 80, 1886, . . . . . 


35 


11 


- 


46 


Returned, having eloped, . . . 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Born, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Totals. 


417 


167 


24 


608 


Discharged by Board of Lunacy and 










Charity, ....... 


21 


22 


5 


48 


Placed out on trial, ..... 


188 


52 


- 


185 


Removed to Lyman School, 


2 


- 


- 


2 


Removed to State Almshouse at Tewks- 










bury. 


1 


2 


2 


5 


Removed to Mass. School for Feeble-Mind- 










ed Children, ...... 


(1 


1 


_ 


7 


Removed to Clark Institution at Northamp- 










ton, ........ 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Removed to Deaf and Dumb Asylum at 










Hartford, 


- 


1 


- 


1 


Boarded out in families, .... 


22 


13 


- 


35 


Transferred to Hospital Cottages for Chil- 










dren, 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Eloped, and not returned 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Died, 


2 


4 


- 


6 


Totals, 


189 


95 


8 


292 


Remaining Oct. 1, 1887, .... 


228 


72 


16 


316 



1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



35 



Statement B. 

Comparative Statistics. 
Number of Persons in the Institution. 



Sept. 30, 1883, 


. 440 


" 30, 1884, 


. 398 


" 30, 1885, 


. 393 


" 30, 1886, 


. 368 


" 30, 1887, 


. 316 


Average for 5 years, 


. 383 


Average Number of Persons in the Institution. 




Year ending Sept. 30, 1883, 


, 436 


" 30, 1881, 


. 425 


" 30, 1885, ■ . 


. 416 


" 30, 1886, 


. 391 


" 30, 1887, 


. 332 


Average for 5 years, 


. 400 



Largest Number of Persons in the Institution. 

During year ending Sept. 30, 1883, 

" 30, 1884, 

" 30, 1885, 

" 30, 1886, 

" 30, 1887, 
Average for 5 years, 



475 
458 
450 
418 
370 
434+ 



Smallest Number of Persons in the Institution. 

During year ending Sept. 30, 1883, .... 
" ' " 30, 1884, . .'■";, 

" 30, 1885, .... 

" 30, 1886, .... 

" 30,1887, .... 
Average for 5 years, 



386 
384 
368 
367 
289 
359. 



Number of Children received from Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 
Juvenile 



During year ending Sept. 30, 1883, 
" 30,1884, 
" 30, 1885, 
" 30, 1886, 
" 30, 1887, 

Average for 5 years, 



32 
28 
33 
40 
34 
33+ 



36 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Number of Children received from Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 
Neglected Children. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1883, . 30 

" 30, 1884, ........ 15 

" 30, 1885, 27 

" 30, 188G, 32 

" 30, 1887, 23 

Average for 5 years, 25-4- 

Number of Children received from Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 
Dependent Children. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1883, 19 

" 30, 1884, 31 

" 30, 1885, 29 

" 30, 1880, 11 

li 30, 1887, 9 

Average for 5 years, 20 — 

Number received from State Almshouse. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1883, 87 

" 30, 1884, G9 

" 30, 1885, 99 

" 30, 1880, 27 

" 30, 1887, 76 

Average for 5 years, 72 — 



Number of Children born in the Institution. 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1883, 

" 30, 1884, 

" 30, 1885, 

" 30, 1886, 

" 30, 1887, 
Average for 5 years, 



Number of Children returning from place, having been placed out in 
previous years. 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1883, 40 



" 30, 1884, 
" 30, 1885, 
" 30, 1886, 
" 30, 1887, 
Average for 5 years, 



29 
49 
47 
46 
42-f 



1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



37 



Number of Children returned from place, having been placed out in 
current years. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1883, . 44 

" 30, 1884, ........ 31 

" 30, 1885, ........ 38 

" 30, 1886, .34 

" 30, 1887, 46 

Average for 5 years, 39- 



Number of Children released on trial, and boarded in families. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1883, 

" 30, 1884, . . . . ' . 

« 30, 1885, ....... 

" 30, 1886, 

" 30, 1887, 



216 
186 
186 
171 
220 



Average for 5 years, 196 — 



Number of Elopers not returned. 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1883, 

" 30, 1884, 

" 30, 1885, 

" 30, 1886, 

" 30, 1887, 

Average for 5 years, 



Number of Deaths. 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1883, .... 

" 30, 1884, .... 

" 30, 1885, .... 

" 30, 1886, .... 

" 30, 1887, .... 
Average for 5 years, 



13 
3 

3 

6 

7— 



Statement C. — Nativity of Inmates. 

The nativity of the 240 persons received during the year is as fol- 
lows : — 
Native born, ............ 168 

Foreign born, 41 

Unknown, 31 



Of the foreign born, there were born in — 



Canada, . 
Cape Breton, 
England, 
Germany, 
Ireland, . 
Italy, 



3 
1 

6 

1 

18 

1 



New Brunswick, . 


2 


Nova Scotia, . 


3 


Prince Edward Island, 


1 


Scotland, 


1 


Western Islands, . 


3 


At sea, . 


1 



38 



PEIMAEY AND EEFOEM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Of those born in the United States, there were born in 
Connecticut, . . . . S North Carolina, 



Massachusetts, 
Maine, . 
New Hampshire, 
New York, 



140 
4 
3 
5 



Pennsylvania, 
Rhode Island, 
Vermont, 



Of those born in 


Mas 


sachusetts, tl 


Alford, . 


1 


Ayer, . 

Boston, . 








1 
24 


Bridgewater, 








1 


Brighton, 








1 | 


Cambridge, 








6 


Charlestown. 








7 


Chelsea, . 








1 


Chicopee, 
Deerfiekl, 








1 
1 


Dracut, . 








1 


East Boston, 








••> 


Full River, 








to 


Fitchburg, 








1 


Gay Head, 
Grafton, 








1 

1 


Haverhill, 








I 


llolyoke, 








2 


Lawrence, 








2 


Lowell, . 








4 


Lynn, . 








3 


Marlborough, 








;; 


Melrose, 








2 


Milford, . 








1 


Monson, . 








1 



Montague, 
New Bedford, 
North Adams, 
North Andover, 
North Billerica, 
North Brookfield, 
North Lee, 
Peabody, 
Petersham, 
Pittsficld, 
Salem, . 
Somcrville, . 
Southbridge, 
Springfield, 
Stoughton, 
Tewksbury, . 
Taunton, 
Unknown, 
Waltham, 
Wareham, 
Watertown, . 
\\ ebster, 

Williainsfnu ||, 
Wobuin. 
w orcester, 



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1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



41 



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42 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 









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Amos Andrews, . 
John N". Laoey, . 
Sarah M. Wilbur, M.D., 
James J. Prentiss, 
Frank Duffy, 
Elon G. Buss, 
Charles H. Bradley, 
A. W. Mansur, . 
S. J. Baker, . 
John M. Sears, . 
J. M. Sisk, . 
Mrs. M. A. Andrews, 
Miss A. Swinerton, . 
Mrs. A. S. Daniels, 
Mrs. M. C. Bradley, . 
Miss Etta J. Lent, . 
Miss M. A. Clark, . 
Miss E. M. Fullington, 
Miss N. J. Rice, . 
Miss 0. A. Cheney, 
Miss Cora A. Underwood, 
Miss Annie N. Lewis, . 
Miss G. A. Cheney, . 
Miss E. 8. Foster, . 
Miss Harriet Lacey,. 


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1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 43 

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Teamster, . 

Assistant Farmer, 

Hospital Attendant, 

Fireman, 
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Samuel C. Rogers, 
William M. Payne, 
George H. Fisherdick, 
W. H. Williams, 
Edward E. Walker, 
W. H. Williams, . 
Fred S. Barnes, . 
Joseph Merriam, 
Alyah H. Jenkins, 
Walter E. Rogers, . 
L. G. Loomis, 
F. H. Aldrich, . 
R. H. Magwood, 
William M. Watson, 
James Skeyington, 
H. E. Royce. . 
William Franklin, 
Thomas J. Flynn, 
William Kelley, 


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1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



45 



Statement G. 

Products of the Farm. 



Quantity. 



Apples, early, 
" eider, 
" winter 

Asparagus 

Beans, . 

Beef, . 

Beets, . 

Cabbage, 

Carrots, 

Celery, 

Corn fodder 

Crab-apples 

Cucumbers, 

Currants, 

Eggs, . 

Ensilage, 

Grapes, 

Hay, . 

Ice, 

Indian corn, 

Lettuce, 

Mangolds 

Manure, 

Milk, . 

Oats, . 

Onions, 

Fears, . 

Pease, . 

Pork, . 

Parsnips, 

Potatoes, 

Poultry, 

Quinces, 

Radishes, 

Rhubarb, 

Rowen, 

Raspberries, 

Strawberries, 

Squash, summer, 
" winter, 

Sweet corn, . 

Tomatoes, . 

Turnips, 

Veal, . 

Wood, . 

Total, . 



38 


bushels, 


400 


u 


200 


barrels, 


15 


bushels, 


14i 


u 


6,632 


pounds, 


86 


bushels, 


2,450 


heads, 


850 


bushels, 


480 


bunches 


9 


tons, . 


5 


bushels, 


47 


" 


30 


quarts, 


233 


dozen, 


125 


tons, 


150 


pounds, 


150 


tons, . 


200 


(,. 


150 


bushels, 


500 


heads, 


2,000 


bushels, 


300 


cords, 


8,250 


quarts, 


12 


tons, . 


117 


bushels, 


5 


" 


20 


» 


5,575 


pounds, 


30 


bushels, 


5201 


" 


182 


pounds, 


3 


bushels, 


125 


pounds, 


2,000 


" 


23 


tons, . 


35 


quarts, 


384 


" 


850 


pounds, 


2 


tons, . 


42 


bushels, 


42 


« 


350 


» 


385 


pounds, 


40 


cords, 



$57 00 


40 


00 


350 00 


37 50 


43 


50 


464 


24 


38 70 


196 


00 


382 


50 


48 


00 


72 


00 


5 


00 


188 


00 


1 


50 


58 


25 


625 


00 


10 


50 


2,550 


00 


600 


00 


112 


50 


15 


00 


600 00 


1,200 


00 


5,130 


00 


189 


00 


87 


75 


10 


00 


50 


00 


362 


37 


13 


50 


520 


50 


45 


50 


6 


00 


5 


00 


30 


00 


391 


00 


4 


20 


46 


08 


12 


75 


80 


00 


21 


00 


21 


00 


70 


00 


38 


50 


160 


00 


$14,989 34 



46 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. 



Statement H. 

Work done in Sewing-Room No. 1 



ARTICLES. 


Made. 


Repaired. 


Total. 


Aprons, 


489 


163 


652 


Bibs, . 












72 


_ 


72 


Bed ticks, . 












- 


546 


546 


Bed spreads, 












_ 


14 


14 


Blankets, . 












_ 


14 


14 


Blouses, 












- 


7 


7 


Capes, 












- 


77 


77 


Chemises, . 












242 


- 


242 


Cloaks, 












92 


- 


92 


Coats, . 












6 


18 


24 


Curtains, . 












26 


- 


26 


Drawers, . 












209 


- 


209 


Dresses, 












320 


46 


366 


Eye-shades, 












14 


- 


14 


Hoods, 












_ 


49 


49 


Night-dresses, 












136 


- 


136 


Pants, . 












- 


15 


15 


Pen-wipers, 












108 


- 


108 


Pillow cases, 












422 


167 


589 


Pillow ticks, 












_ 


38 


38 


Sacqnes, 












20 


- 


20 


Scrub pads, 












20 


- 


20 


Sheets, 












507 


174 


681 


Shirts, 












37 


1,521 


1,558 


Shirt waists, 












36 


- 


36 


Skirts, 












195 


4 


199 


Stockings, . 












- 


3,938 


3,938 


Table cloths, 












3 


9 


12 


Table napkins, 












60 


22 


82 


Tea bags, . 












9 


- 


9 


Towels, 












709 


675 


1,384 


Waists, 












205 


- 


205 


Wash cloths, 












167 . 


- 


167 


Totals, 












4,104 


7,497 


11,601 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



47 



Statement I. 
Work done in Sewing- Room No. 2. 



ARTICLES. 


Made. 


Repaired. 


Total. 


Blouses, 

Caps, 

Jackets, 

Kitchen aprons, ..... 
Pants, ....... 

Shirts, 

Suspenders, ..... 


375 

249 

14 

857 
600 
382 


52 
1,632 

2,583 


52 

375 

1,881 

14 

3,440 

600 

382 




2,477 


4,267 


6,744 



Total number of articles made, 
" " " repaired, 



6,581 
11,764 

18,345 



48 PRIMARY AND REFOEM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Statement J. 

Amos Andrews, Superintendent and Disbursing Officer of the State 
Primary School, in account with the State Treasurer. 

Dr. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1886, 

received from appropriation for current expenses for 

1886, 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1886, 

received from appropriation for current expenses for 

1887, 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1887, 

received from appropriation for machinery and repairs 

in laundry, ........ 

received from sales, ....... 



Cr. 

Disbursements for three months ending Dec. 31, 1886, 
Disbursements for nine months ending Sept. 30, 1887, 
Payments to State Treasurer, ..... 
Cash on hand, ........ 



[Note — This institution has no "fund " from which to draw for any 
expenditure whatever. It derives its support wholly from the State 
Treasury by annual legislative appropriations. 

The per capita cost for the year, including ordinary expenses only, 
is $2.69. This sum shows the cost of clothing, food and lodging, 
medical attendance, teaching and supervision, — in brief, the entire 
expense of maintaining all the inmates of the institution, — together 
with all ordinary repairs, such as must constantly be made to keep the 
buildings and appliances in good condition ; including also the cost of 
heating and lighting the buildings, and of furnishing an outfit for all 
pupils going away from the school, and their travelling expenses. 

Children placed out on trial are provided with two complete suits 
of clothing, with an overcoat extra in cold w eather, the whole outfit 
costing on an average $16.00. 

The State appropriations are made for calendar years, while the 
reports of institutions are made for years ending September 30. 

It will, therefore, readily be seen that while the expenditures are kept 
within the yearly appropriations, the expense for the institution year 
may be larger or smaller than the appropriation, including, as it does, 
parts of two calendar years.] 



$100 00 


11,714 66 


1,037 


99 


36,710 82 


2,397 


17 


841 

88 


33 

00 


$52,889 


97 


$12,752 65 

39,949 32 

88 00 

100 00 


$52,889 


97 



1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



41) 



Statement K. — Employment of Children. 

There are employed in the — 

Dormitories and other parts of the house, 

Sewing-room No. 1, . 

Sewing-room No. 2 

Dining-hall, 

Kitchen, 

Shoe-shop, . 

Bakery, 

Laundry, 

Hospital, 

On the farm and at the barns, 

Dormitories and miscellaneous work about the house and 

grounds, 

Girls, 36 ; bovs, 131 ; total, 167. 



15 


girls 


. 21 


" 


. 15 


boys 


. 19 


" 


. 6 


" 


. 3 


" 


. 6 


u 


. 8 


" 


. 2 


" 


. 41 


" 



31 



Statement L. — Children boarded in families. 
Children boarded in families Sept. 30, 1887, paid for from 

appropriation of State Primary School, . ... 33 

Number of days 1 board paid for, 12,459 

Amount paid during the year, $3,435 16 

Weekly per capita cost, . . . . . . . . $1 93 

This sum does not include expense of investigation of places, nor of 
visiting the children after being located, which is paid by the Depart- 
ment of Indoor Poor, and increases the cost to the State. 



Statement M. — Recapitulation of Inventory. 
Taken by Enos Calkins and James B. Shaw of Palmer. 
Sept 30, 1887 
Land, 
Buildings, 
Live stock, 
Products of farm, 

Carriages and agricultural implements 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 
Beds and bedding (inmates), 
Other furniture, .... 

Clothing, 

Superintendent's department, 

Dry goods, 

Groceries and provisions, 

Drugs and medicines, 

Fuel, .... 

Library and school supplies, 

Heating, water, and gas (with fixtures), 

Miscellaneous, ..... 



Total, 



as of 

$22,664 81 
99,500 00 
7,363 70 
7,415 00 
3,441 30 
9,333 64 
4,959 74 
5,452 94 
5,381 96 
6,463 05 
2,160 28 

1.332 55 
252 14 

3,339 10 

1,363 05 

22,300 00 

1.333 19 



$204,056 45 



50 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Statement N. — Receipts. 
Cash on hand at the beginning of the year, .... $100 00 

received from unexpended appropriation of former 

calendar year, 11,714 66 

received from appropriation for the present calendar 

year, 36,710 82 

received from special appropriations for boarding out 

children, 3,435 16 

received from special appropriation for machinery, 

and repairs in laundry, 841 33 

received from sales, 88 00 



Statement O. — Expenditures. 

Current Expenditures. 
For salaries, wages and labor, 
meat, .... 
fish, ..... 
fruit and vegetables, 
flour, .... 
grain, feed and meal, 
tea, coffee and chocolate, 
sugar and molasses, 
milk, butter, eggs and cheese, 
other groceries and provisions, 
clothing, boots and shoes, 
fuel and lights, 
medical supplies, 
furniture, beds and bedding, kitchen and table ware, 

transportation, 

ordinary repairs, ...... 

extraordinary repairs, 

other current expenses, 

Total, 

Extraordinary Expenditures. 
Payments to State Treasurer, .... 
For board of children in families, 
For machinery and repairs in laundry, . 
Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1887, 

Statement P. — Resources and Liabilities. 
Resources. 

Cash on hand, . 

Unexpended appropriations, 



$52,889 97 



. $17,522 51 


2,808 13 


530 19 


152 98 


2,295 00 


1,542 22 


450 90 


938 37 


2,594 57 


836 14 


5,228 32 


3,808 50 


338 40 


1,194 23 


664 89 


2,415 31 


1,981 83 


3,122 99 


. $48,425 48 


$88 00 


3,435 16 


841 33 


100 00 



Liabilities. 



Miscellaneous bills, 



$52,889 97 

$100 00 

14,950 68 

$15,050 68 

$370 22 



$14,680 46 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



51 



PHYSICIAN'S REPOKT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools : 

I have the honor of presenting you with the annual 
report of the medical department of the State Primary 
School for the year ending Sept. 30, 1887 : — 



Number in hospital Sept. 30, 1886, 
" admitted during the year, 

" of deaths, 

" discharged, 

" remaining in hospital Sept. 30, 1887, 



25 

378 

6 

368 

29 



Unil July 1, 1887, no name was placed on record unless 
in the hospital for twenty-four consecutive hours. Up to 
that date 286 patients had been admitted. Since then, 
record has been kept of all cases entering and notes made of 
symptoms and treatment. The following facts in regard to 
each patient have also been recorded so far as they could be 
ascertained, viz. : name, date of birth, birthplace, name and 
residence of parents, family history, personal history 
(health previous to present illness) and present condition. 

Statistics of Deaths. 



NAME. 


Date of Death. 


Age. 


Cause of Death. 


Timothy Quill, . 


Dec. 13, 1886, 


4 


Scarlet fever. 


Florence Clayton, 


Feb. 19, 1887, 


2 


Scarlet fever. 


Etta Lewis, . 


March 2, 1887, 


11 


Congestion of brain. 


George Chappelle, 


March 5, 1887, 


17 


Pneumonia. 


Thomas Driscoll, 


March 25, 1887, 


13 


Paralysis. 


Frank Cheeseman, 


July 25, 1887, 


10 


Cod sumption. 



Late in October, 1886, a case of scarlet fever appeared in 
our midst, but it proved to be a mild one and made a good 
recovery. In December, others were taken with the same 
disease, and we were not free from it until the folio wins; 
April. Two cases proved fatal, one in December and the 
other in February. 



■i t 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



In December, diphtheria appeared, and we had one case 
after another until April. Some cases were very severe, 
while others were mild in character. Two cases were com- 
plicated with mumps. Each case as soon as diagnosticated 
was isolated to our Hospital Cottage, which we were very glad 
to have at our disposal, as to this is probably due the small ex- 
tent to which the two diseases spread through the school, — 
as there were only twenty cases of scarlet fever and nine of 
diphtheria. 

At my request for a consulting physician through this 
severe sickness, Dr. William Holbrook, of Palmer, was 
called in and aided us by his advice and counsel. 

Search for the cause of the epidemic was not successful, 
although earnest efforts were made by Dr. S. W. Abbott of 
the State Board of Health, the Superintendent and myself. 
The sewerage and ventilating shafts in the department where 
the epidemic began and from which most of the cases came 
were inspected and tested, but no defects were found. 

Through the winter there were over sixty cases of 
tonsillitis, so sick as to require retaining in the hospital for 
a time, while of those coming to the daily clinic for treat- 
ment no record was kept, but they were very numerous. 

George Chappelle, a paralyzed cripple, who had not 
walked for years, died after a severe attack of pneumonia. 
Frank Cheeseman had been sick for over a year with con- 
sumption, to which he finally succumbed. 

There have been four cases of pneumonia and two of 
meningitis, one stubborn case of eczema and a few cases of 
facial erysipelas, chicken pox and German measles. One 
fracture of the forearm has occurred. 

The hygienic condition of the school at present is very 
gratifying. 

I wish to thank those friends who, by gifts of games and 
toys, have increased the happiness of our hospital children, 
and the Superintendent for his kindness and assistance during 
my connection with the school. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SARAH M. WILBUR, 

Resident Physician. 
Monson, Oct. 1, 1887. 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 53 



PRINCIPAL'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the State Primary School : 

The school this year has been unusually small, a fact that 
may point to the greater prosperity of the State, indicating 
a smaller number of unemployed hands than usual, and a 
smaller need of charity. 

In December, Miss Cora A. Underwood resigned, and 
Miss Annie N. Lewis was appointed to the vacancy thus 
occasioned. Miss Georgia A. Mosher, in December, was 
obliged, on account of ill health, to relinquish her charge for 
nearly two terms to the care of Miss Susan E. Crane, now 
Mrs. James J. Prentiss. Miss Flora J. Dyer resigned in 
February, and Miss Evelyn S. Foster was placed in charge 
of the school as substitute. In May, Mrs. Prentiss took the 
school. Miss Georgia A. Cheney, in May, took the place 
of Miss N. J. Rice, who was granted leave of absence for a 
term, in pursuit of health. The vacancy occasioned by the 
resignation of Miss Lewis, in August, was filled by Miss 
Cheney. 

So many changes within a year, it would be natural to 
suppose, would affect the school, as a whole, most ser- 
iously ; but its discipline was unimpaired and its harmony 
undisturbed. 

During the winter the schools were broken somewhat by 
sickness, a number of the pupils being attacked with scarlet- 
fever and diphtheria. Few lives were lost, and the remain- 
der of the year, notwithstanding the excessive heat of the 
summer months, was a period of health and profitable 
work. 



54 PRIMARY AXD REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

A new course of study, similar to the one followed in the 
Boston schools, has been adopted during the year. The one 
previously used was found to be defective, particularly in 
arithmetic. While it may be impossible to accomplish all 
that is now marked out, it is hoped that by having a higher 
standard the tone of the school may be elevated, and excel- 
lent results are confidently expected. 

In judging the teachers' work one needs to keep in view 
the hindrances that baffle them. Pupils are constantly en- 
tering the schools and constantly leaving them. Many enter 
with little or no experience of school life. They naturally 
cannot take up the work as easily as children would, with 
better preparation. Pupils in outside schools, at the close 
of the session, go home to parents, who are generally inter- 
ested in their progress, and who, by words of encouragement 
or censure, spur their ambition. The teachers here are 
wholly without this help. The short vacations are also a 
hindrance to the teachers in their work. They have little 
time to visit other schools, to compare methods with other 
teachers, or to attend conventions. The national educational 
meetings held in the summer are a great stimulus to many 
teachers. It is hoped that an opportunity to attend these 
meetings may sometimes be granted to our teachers. The 
new ideas gained in this way would, doubtless, more than 
compensate for the week of school lost to the pupils. 

The pupils have shown great interest in the examinations 
held at the close of each term, — many of them wishing to 
work during play-hours in order to secure high per cents. 
While the results of these examinations have not always 
been all that could be desired, they have shown in many 
cases that real progress has been made. The letters sent 
by the pupils to parents and friends outside the school are, 
on the Avhole, much better than those received, thus show- 
ing that the pupils have been lifted by the school above the 
ignorance of their early surroundings. 

While the teachers may desire much that has not yet 
been attained for the good of the school, still as they look 
back upon the year's work they find many reasons for grati- 
tude and encouragement. 

The library is appreciated by a large number of pupils 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 55 

and much interest is manifested in the current topics of the 
day. There is a constant labor to be performed in getting 
those who have not formed habits of reading to do so, and 
to teach discrimination between good and bad books and so 
form a correct taste. The library compares well with the 
average library, containing histories, biographies, books of 
travel and description, — presenting to view the life and sur- 
roundings of other people of other climes, — and tales of 
adventure for boys, in which much real instruction is con- 
veyed in connection with exciting incidents, and in a way 
oftentimes not to be forgotten. The number of books given 
out during the year is not less than 2,600. The largest 
number distributed any one day is on Sunday, the average 
being about fifty. In addition to the books in the library, 
the following well-known periodicals are furnished : two 
copies each of " St. Nicholas," " Wide Awake," " Treasure 
Trove " and < ' Temperance Banner ; " four copies each of 
i 'Youth's Companion," "Harper's Young Folks," " Our 
Little Ones" and " Babyland ; " three copies of "Golden 
Days ; " and one copy each of "The Pansy " and " Our Little 
Men and Women." 

There are no books of reference in any of the school- 
rooms. I would suggest that a collection of books which 
will greatly aid school work, and materially assist teachers 
in their eiforts to cultivate among their pupils habits of read- 
ing, be placed in the first, second, third and fifth school- 
rooms. In this way, much more benefit will be derived 
from them than if collected into the central library. The 
supplementary reading you so generously supplied is greatly 
appreciated by the teachers and pupils, the latter having 
been greatly benefited thereby. 

Despite the many perverse circumstances of the year, it 
is but just to state that the high standing of the classes has 
been maintained through the excellent management of the 
teachers ; their willingness, energy and zeal are worthy of 
highest commendation, while the moral influence exerted by 
them, as well as untiring efforts to accomplish high intellect- 
ual results, cannot be too fully appreciated. 

The following general statistics are presented in the usual 
form for convenient comparison with previous reports, also 



56 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

a list of the text-books used in the schools and a school 
calendar for the ensuing year. 

I desire to express my appreciation of your kindness to 
me and the generosity with which you have supplied the 
wants of the school. 

Very respectfully, 

EUGENIA M. FULLINGTON, 

Principal. 

Monso.v, Mass., Oct. 1, 1887. 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 57 



Text Books Used in the School. 

Appleton's Reading Chart. 

Appleton's First, Second, Third and Fourth Readers. 

Badlands Number Cards. 

Parker's Arithmetical Chart. 

Ray's New Primary Arithmetic. 

Ray's New Elementary Arithmetic. 

Ray's New Practical Arithmetic. 

Hyde's Practical Lessons in the Use of English. 

Swinton's Grammar. 

Swinton's Introductory Geography. 

Swinton's Grammar School Geography. 

Higginson's Young Folks' History of the United States. 

Elementary Physiology. 

Meleney and Griffin's Selected Words. 

Worcester's New Pronouncing Spelling Book. 

Cowperthwait's Writing Books. 

Webster's Dictionaries. 



Supplementary Reading. 

American Chart. 

Modern Series Primary Reading. 

Parker's Supplementary Reading. 

Barnes's Readers. 

Sheldon's Fourth Reader. 

Anderson's Historical Reader. 

School Calendar for 1887-8. 
Fall term began . . Monday, Aug. 15 ; ends Nov. 4 = 12 weeks. 
Winter term begins . Monday, Nov. 14 ; ends Feb. 3 = 12 weeks. 
Spring term begins . Monday, Feb. 13; ends May 4 = 12 weeks. 
Summer term begins . Monday, May 14 ; ends July 27 = 11 weeks. 

Number of school weeks in the year, ... 47 
Number of school days in the year, .... 235 

Holidays. — February 22, Washington's Birthday, one half day. 
April — , Fast Day. 
May 30, Decoration Day. 
July 4, Independence Day. 
Sept. — , Labor Day. 
November — , Thanksgiving Day. 
December 25, Christmas Day. 



58 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



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1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18. 



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REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS 



WESTBOROTTGKH. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools : 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — I have the honor to submit 
the annual report of the Lyman School for Boys, for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1887. 



Table No. 1. 

Showing the Number Received and Discharged, and General Con- 
dition of the School for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1887. 



Boys in school Sept. 30, 1886, . 

Received. — Since committed, 
Recommitted, . 
Returned from places, 
by police, . 
by parents, 
voluntarily, 
by S. B. of L. & C. 

Whole number in school during the year, 

Discharged. — On probation, to parents, 
On probation, to others, 
To State Workhouse, . 
To Massachusetts Reformatory 
To enlist in navy, 
By elopement (4 returned), 
To accompany parents out of the State 

Remaining in school Sept. 30, 1887, .... 



93 
1 

14 
7 
4 
-4 
1 



35 

45 
1 
3 
2 

9 
1 



90 



124 



214 



96 



118 



64 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Table No. 2. 

Showing the Admissions, Number Discharged, and Average Num- 
ber of each Month. 



MONTHS. 


Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Average No. 


1886. 








October 


20 


7 


94.61 


November. .... 


10 


5 


105.96 


December. .... 


3 


4 


107.90 


1887. 








January, 


8 


11 


102.80 


February. 








8 


7 


105.03 


March. 








4 


6 


103.07 


April. 








9 


12 


101.76 * 


.May. 








11 


5 


102.12 


June. 








9 


9 


106.46 


July. 








8 


14 


104.16 


August. 








19 


9 


104.03 


September, 








15 


7 


113.96 


Totals, 








124 


96 


104.32 



Table No. 3. 

Shoving the Commitments from the severed Counties the past Year 

and previously. 



COUNTIES. 



Barnstable, 

Berkshire, 

Bristol, . 

Dukes, 

Essex. 

Franklin, . 

Hampden, 

Hampshire, 

Middlesex, 

Nantucket, 

Norfolk. . 

Plymouth. 

Suffolk, . 

Worcester, 

Totals, 



Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 




47 


47 


5 


202 


207 


10 


520 


530 


2 


9 


11 


9 


963 


972 


1 


51 


52 


6 


322 


328 


1 


71 


72 


34 


995 


1,029 


- 


16 


16 


3 


927 


930 


- 


107 


107 


7 


1,190 


1,197 


15 


641 


656 


93 


6,061 


6,154 



1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



«;;, 



Table No. 4. 
Showing Nativity of Parents of Boys Committed during the Year 



Fathers American born, ....... 


12 


Mothers American born, ....... 


7 


Father Foreign born, 


8 


Mother Foreign born, 


13 


Both parents American born, . . . 


15 


Both parents Foreign born, 


43 


Unknown, .......... 


25 



Shoiving Nativity of Boys Committed during the Year. 



American born, 
Foreign born, 
Unknown, . 



Total, 



80 
13 



93 



Table No. 5. 

Showing by what Authority the Commitments have been made the 

past Year. 



COMMITMENTS- 



Past Year. 



By State Board of Lunacy and Charity, 
Police Court, . . 
District Court, .... 
Trial Justices, .... 
Municipal Court, .... 

Total 



3 
24 
50 

4 

2 



93 



<!<; PRIMARY AM) REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Table No. 6. — Showing Age of Boys when Committed. 



Age. 


Past year. 


Previously. 


Total. 


Six years, .... 




5 


5 


Seven years, . 


- 


25 


25 


Eight years, .... 


- 


116 


116 


Nine years, .... 


— 


234 


234 


Ten years, .... 


- 


438 


438 


Eleven years, . . . 


5 


622 


627 


Twelve years, .... 


1-4 


690 


704 


Thirteen years, 


19 


814 


833 


Fourteen years, 


4-1 


1,007 


1,051 


Fifteen years, .... 


8 


887 


895 


Sixteen years, .... 


2 


928 


930 


Seventeen years, 


- 


280 


280 


Eighteen years and over, 


- 


59 


59 


Unknown, . ... 


1 


29 


29 


Total, . . 


93 


6,134 


6,227 



Table No. 7. — Showing the Domestic Condition of Boys ivho 
have been Inmates of the School during the Year. 



CONDITION". 



Number. 



Had parents, 


. 


112 


no parents, . 




11 


no father, 




35 


no mother, . 




33 


step-father, . 




10 


step-mother, 




11 


intemperate father, 




46 


intemperate mother, . 




19 


both intemperate parents, 


. 


18 


parents separated, 




7 


attended church, . 




148 


never attended church, 




7 


never attended school, 




1 


Could not read or write, 


. 


8 


Had not attended school within 


3ne year, .... 


41 


" 41 


two years, 


27 


" " " i 


:hree " 


12 


been arrested before, . 




6Q 


been inmates of other insti 


tutions, .... 


24 


Other members of family had b< 


3en arrested, . 


39 


Had used intoxicating liquor, 




28 


used tobacco, 




134 


Were employed in mill or other 


wise when arrested, 


122 


idle, .... 




40 


attending school, 




35 


Parents owning residence, . 




24 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



67 



Table No. 8. 

Shows the length of time the Boys have spent in the School since 

Commitment, who have left the past Year. 



3 months or less, 


5 


2 years, 3 months, 


2 


4 


' 






- 


2 " 4 


2 


5 


' 








- 


2 " 5 




- 


6 


t 








1 


2 " 6 




_ 


7 


' 








- 


2 » 7 




2 


8 


' 








- 


2 " 8 




3 


9 


' 








- 


2 " 9 




_ 


10 










- 


2 " 10 • " 




- 


11 








2 


2 " 11 




- 


1 year, . 








5 


3 years, . 




- 


1 " 1 month, 








8 


3 " 1 month, 




_ 


1 " 2 months, 








11 


3 " 2 months, 




_ 


1 " 3 








7 


3 " 3 




_ 


1 "• 4 








3 


3 " 4 




_ 


1 ■" 5 








2 


3 " 5 




_ 


1 " 6 








13 


3 U Q 




, _ 


1 " 7 








13 


3 " 7 




_ 


1 " 8 








14 


3 " 8 




_ 


1 " 9 








2 


3 " 9 




_ 


1 " 10 








6 


3 " 10 




1 


1 " 11 








4 


3 " 11 




_ 


2 years, 








- 


4 years and more, 




_ 


2 " 1 month, 








_ 







2 " 2 months, 






— 


Total, . 


96 



st of Articles made 


in the Sewing- 


■Boo 


m during 


the Year. 


Aprons, 
Bags, . 
Caps, . 
Collars, 
Curtains, . 












• 


34 

2 

132 

108 
1 


Dish cloths, 














2 


Jackets, 














4 


Ironholders, 












. 


38 


Napkins, 
Overalls, . 














42 
15 


Pillow slips, 














35 


Pants, 
Shirts, 
Sheets, 














19 

192 
65 


Suspenders, 
Towels, 
Table covers, 














1 

104 
13 


Total, . 














807 



K8 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



List of Articles repaired in the Sewing-Room during the Year. 
Aprons, ......... 175 

Blankets, . 
Bed ticks, . 
Collars, 
Carriage robe, 
Curtains, . 
Caps, . 



Jackets, 

Napkins, 

Overalls, 

Organ case, 

Pants, 

Pillow slips, 

Stockings, . 

Shirts, 

Sheets, 

Spreads, 

Suspenders, 

Towels, 

Table cloths, 

Vests, . 

Total, . 



51 

206 

226 

1 

2 

75 

1,638 

2 

11 

1 

3,902 

112 

5,723 

2,971 

284 

9 

16 

209 

23 

9 

15,646 



Laundry Work. 

Number of Pieces washed and ironed in Laundry during the Year. 

Washed and ironed, 86,374 

Starched, 22,404 



Total, 



108,778 



In a retrospect of the past two and one-half years it is 
very gratifying to be able to report the school in its present 
condition, and to find that the work performed shows a 
reasonable amount of success. The boys committed — con- 
sidering the life to which they have been accustomed, the 
freedom allowed them, their associations and environment, 
before being placed at the school — have shown a remark- 
able willingness to conform to the rules and restraints which 
must necessarily accompany institution life. There are indi- 
vidual cases where nothing that is done appears to make a 
lasting impression for good ; but as ' ' constant dropping 
wears the rock," so may constant and continued effort in the 



1887] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. i ! 

right direction have its effect, and sometime in the future 
the good seed take root and bear abundant fruit. We can- 
not expect to observe the results of a few months' teaching 
immediately, when years have been spent in gaining a know- 
ledge of evil, and their education only such as has been 
acquired upon the street among the low and vicious. Is it 
strange, then, that so many of the young in our cities and 
larger towns become inmates of our charitable and reforma- 
tory institutions? By reference to Table 6, in this report, 
it will be seen that a very large per cent, of those who have 
made up the population of the school during the past year 
have been living within the influence of intemperate homes. 
Cannot the old adage, "blood will tell," be illustrated in 
this connection? Is it not one of the strong lessons of 
nature that an individual is only in a limited degree what 
would be termed a free agent? He inherits from his parents 
moral qualities in the same way that he inherits physical 
attributes, and it would seem to show that the sins are not 
confined in their effect to themselves, but are " visited upon 
their children to the third and fourth generations." Of those 
placed out from the school, although a certain number fail 
to show in their subsequent behavior that our teachings have 
been successful, still we take much comfort and pleasure in 
thinking of the larger number who are honoring themselves 
and their teachers. It being the idea of the founder of this 
school to make a home for restoring of the wayward and 
homeless to good and honest lives, it has been our aim to 
maintain such restraint, discipline and education as would 
be necessary in any good and well-regulated home. 

The chapel, of which mention was made in the last report, 
was dedicated June 3, Rev. Phillips Brooks delivering the 
address. The boys listened attentively to the remarks of 
the speaker, and the occasion was one of much interest for 
all present. Some of the members of the family of Hon. 
Theodore Lyman, founder of the school, were among the 
guests, and expressed their satisfaction with the condition 
of the school. The boys assemble in chapel an hour each 
Sunday morning for Sunday school, and appropriate relig- 
ious services are held in the afternoon, conducted by some 
clergyman from Westborough or neighboring towns. The 



70 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Catholic priest from Westborough visits the institution as 
often as once in each week, when all the boys who desire to 
meet him have the opportunity. The boys have been en- 
couraged to give entertainments in chapel each month (ex- 
cept during the summer) , which are very interesting and a 
credit to their skill and perseverance. They have also 
attended exhibitions at the Town Hall in the village several 
times during the past winter, returning in the evening. 
These privileges have been appreciated and enjoyed. 

Chaxges axd Improvemexts. 
During the winter the school population increased so rap- 
idly it was found necessaiy to open another house, and a 
family of twenty-live boys with the usual number of officers 
was placed in the Willow Park buildings temporarily. The 
Legislature was asked, and with its usual liberality made an 
appropriation of seven thousand ($7,000) dollars to purchase 
and remodel these buildings, which has been done, and they 
are nearly ready for occupancy, — the family in the mean- 
time occupying the attic and work-room of Lyman Hall as a 
sleeping-room and school-room. These buildings will give 
ample accommodations for thirty boys. It was found neces- 
sary to do considerable repairing to the farm barn. The 
floors and floor timbers together with many of the posts, 
being much decayed, were removed and replaced with new 
tie-rods inserted between the plates, and supports beneath 
the barn placed in good condition, and the exterior of the 
barn and outbuildings given two coats of paint. The im- 
provements have not been wholly confined to the buildings ; 
much of the labor of inmates and teams has been utilized 
upon the grounds, and considerable progress made in laying 
the foundations for roads, and in grading about the premises. 
This work must necessarily be slow in completion as it is 
wholly performed by the inmates and our own teams when 
not engaged in necessary firm labor. As an instance of 
what has been accomplished, in the past year, may be men- 
tioned a field of five acres from which the stone has been 
removed to such an extent as to allow of its being plowed 
and planted, which a year ago was not considered serviceable 
except as pasturage. It is very difficult to appraise the 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 71 

labor of the inmates when engaged in this and ordinary farm 
labor, as our working hours are less than the usual day and 
the boys unfamiliar with the work, and therefore unable to 
accomplish the same amount as the average farmer's boy. 
The day of twenty-four hours is divided at the school as 
follows : — 

Six hours for work. 

Four hours for school, 

Five hours for meals and recreation. 

Nine hours for sleep. 

The inmates are provided with an abundant supply of 
well-cooked, nutritious food. The following is the 

Bill of Fake. 
Breakfast. — Wheat bread, molasses, tea or coffee ; sometimes beans 
or meat left from previous dinner. 

Supper. — Bread and whole milk, molasses. 

Dinners. 
Monday. — Clam chowder or salt fish, bread. 
Tuesday. — Roast beef or pork, potatoes, bread. 
Wednesday. — Beef or pork stew, bread. 
Thursday. — Baked beans, brown bread. 
Friday. — Fish chowder, bread. 
Saturday. — Corned beef and vegetables, bread. 
Sunday. — Baked beans, brown bread ; dessert of pie or puddings. 

A variety of fruit and vegetables of our own raising are 
used daily in their season. The health of the inmates still 
continues to hold its high standard of excellence. The 
Physician's report will give an account of all cases coming to 
his notice, although but few of them were in the hospital 
more than a day or two. 

The farm has been quite productive, as the report of prod- 
uce, on hand and consumed as appraised, will show. As 
so much land Avas occupied in raising vegetables for use at 
the school it was found necessary to purchase considerable 
hay, and I considered it the better economy to hire an ad- 
joining farm and cut the grass. Several acres of this land 
were planted to corn, from which a fair crop was harvested. 

We feel very strongly the need of an ice-house for the 
storage of a year's supply of ice. At this time we are buy- 



72 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

ing what is needed, as our storage was not sufficient last 
winter to store enough for the year. We also need a place 
for wood, several cords of which are used each year. Among 
the buildings purchased with the Willow Park estate are 
several which could be made serviceable as woodsheds, ice- 
house and piggery, which is also needed. The appropria- 
tion for the present calendar year is not sufficient to warrant 
an expenditure in repairing these buildings, and I would 
respectfully suggest that an appropriation for that purpose 
be asked of the Legislature at its next session. 

We are under obligations to the many friends of the 
school for the pleasant reminders received, from time to 
time, of the deep interest which is felt for its success. 

We also appreciate the kind words of encouragement given 
the boys by those who visit the institution. It is a great 
incentive to a boy to know that his efforts are recognized 
by those whose judgment he respects, and that some one 
believes in his ability to make an honorable man. 

Our thanks are also due the officers who have labored with 
us in promoting the welfare of the school ; and to you, ladies 
and gentlemen, for your words of encouragement and val- 
uable assistance. 

Respectfully submitted , 

H. E. SWAX, 

Superintendent. 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No, 18, 



78 



TREASURER'S REPORT, 



1886 — October, Received froni the State Treasurer, 




$2,400 23 


November, " " ' 


' 




2,553 77 


December, " " 


; a 




1,785 54 


1887 — January, 


' 




2,347 71 


February, " " 


4 




2,507 95 


March, 


i 




2,952 76 


April, " " 


4 14 




1,813 67 


May, 


t u 




2,882 75 


June, " " 


4 




1,967 73 


July, 


4 




3,800 35 


August, " " 


' 




2,089 27 


September, " " " " 




2,970 50 




$30,072 23 



Bills Paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 



1886 — October, 

November, 
December, 

1887 — January, 

February, 
March, 
April, 
May, . 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, 



$2,400 


23 


2,553 77 


1,785 


54 


2,347 


71 


2,507 


95 


2,952 


76 


1,813 


67 


2,882 


75 


1,967 73 


3,800 


35 


2,089 


27 


2,970 50 


$30,072 


23 



74 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Amount drawn from State Treasury. 

Special Appropriation for Chapel, Lyman School for Boys. 

1886 — December, $7*5 00 

1887 — March, 1,084 96 



$1,869 96 



Amount drawn from State Treasury. 

Special Appropriation for the purchase of Willow Park Estate, Lyman 
School for Boys. 
1887 — May, $3,000 00 



Amount drawn from State Treasury. 

Special Appropriation for repairs on Willow Park Buildings, Lyman 
School for Boys. 

1887 — June, |514 94 

July, 486 93 

August, 691 66 

September, 586 33 



$2,279 86 



Expenditures. 
Bills Paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Chapel. 

1886— December, $785 00 

1887 — March, 1,084 96 



$1,869 96 

Bills Paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Willow Park Estate. 
1887— May, $3,000 00 

Expenditure. 

Bills Paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Repairs on Willow 
Park Buildings. 

1887 — June, $514 94 

July, . . 486 93 

August, . . 691 66 

September 586 33 

$2,279 86 



1887. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



75 



Expenditures for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1887. 

Salaries of officers and employees, ...... $10,957 08 

Wages of other persons temporarily employed, . . . 1,985 82 



Provision and grocery supplies, including — 

Meat, 

Fish, 

Fruit and vegetables, 

Flour and bread, .... 

Grain, feed and meal for stock, 

Tea, coffee and chocolate, . 

Sugar and molasses, .... 

Milk, butter and cheese, . 

Other groceries and provisions, 

Clothing of all kinds, 

Fuel and lights, .... 

Medicines and medical supplies, 

Furniture, beds and bedding, . 

School property, books and supplies, 

Ordinary repairs, .... 

Blacksmi thing, horse and cattle shoein_ 

Express, freight and passenger fares, 

Stationery, postage, telegrams and newspapers 

Seeds, plants and fertilizers, farm tools and repairing same, 

Rent and water, .... 

Miscellaneous, 



701 


54 


336 


58 


93 


02 


1,701 


40 


1,273 


96 


277 


01 


495 


71 


521 


25 


954 71 


1,863 


80 


2,386 


69 


36 


97 


1,317 


26 


687 


34 


2,348 


11 


78 


29 


614 


18 


299 58 


528 


00 


235 


00 


378 


93 


$30,072 


23 



76 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct 



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PUBLIC DOCUMENT — Xo. 18. 



77 





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Trans])ortation and 

expenses, . 
Postage and telegram 
Provisions and grocei 
School property, 
Clothing, . 
Grain and meal for st 
Ordinary repairs, 
Fuel and lights, . 
News, S. S. and wast' 
Furniture, beds and l 
Plants, seeds and fert 
Farm tools, . 
Horse and cattle shoe 
Live stock, . 
Petties, 
Stationery, . 
Drugs and medical sn 
Printing, 
Rent, . 
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1887.1 PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 79 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools : 

Following is a report of the medical department of the 
Lyman School for Boys for the year ending at this date : — 

It has been the custom in former years to record only the 
more serious ailments. This year I have recorded every 
case treated, consequently the number appears larger than 
usual though there has been no increase. 

I have made one hundred and one visits to the school, and 
prescribed for seventy-nine different patients, most of whom 
but mildly sick or suffering from slight accidents. One case 
of pneumonia was very severe, but made a good recovery. 
Four fractures of the forearm, one dislocation of the ankle 
with fracture of the small bone in the leg, have received 
attention and recovered perfectly. 

At this time good health prevails, and the sanitary con- 
dition of the school is satisfactory. 

Respectfully submitted , 



Westborough. Sept. 30, 1887. 



F. E. COREY, 

Fhysician. 



80 



PRIMAKY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



FARMER'S REPORT. 



To H. E. Swan, Superintendent. 

Sir: — I herewith submit, for your consideration, my 
second annual report. 

The hay crop was large, but owing to the severe rains the 
latter part of the haying season much hay was of inferior 
quality. 

The vegetable crops were increased in acreage, and were 
of good quality, except onions and squash, which was due 
to some defect at the root. The potato crop was almost a 
failure. The yield of corn was uncommonly large and of 
good quality. The number of acres was increased by the 
addition of the "Wilson Farm," where four acres of field 
and three of corn for fodder were planted. The apple yield 
was about one-half the usual amount. 

Our dairy is smaller, owing to having killed two cows at 
the suggestion of Dr. Winchester of the cattle commission, 
as they were found to be infected with tuberculosis. 

Aside from the work on the farm, and the usual routine 
of drawing freight and coal, the teams have been employed 
in drawing stones and gravel for the new road, in all to the 
amount of one hundred and five days. The following sched- 
ules show the productions on hand, consumed and sold, 
together with a list of the live stock as appraised, and 
the appraised value of agricultural implements, carriages, 

etc. : — 

Produce on Hand. 



Apples, 40 barrels, . 


$80 00 


Beans, 4 bushels, 


6 00 


Beets, 175 bushels, . 


87 00 


Cabbage, 1,950 heads, 


97 00 


Carrots, 125 bushels, 


31 00 


Corn, 465 bushels, . 


279 00 


English hay, 60 tons, 


960 00 



1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



81 



Fodder corn, 10 tons, 
Fodder, 18 tons, 
Meadow hay, 28 tons, 
Melons, 500, . 
Potatoes, 640 bushels, 
Parsnips, 150 bushels, 
Peppers, 5 bushels, . 
Pears, 8 bushels, 
Rowen hay, 1 ton, . 
Squash, 2,200 pounds, 
Sweet corn, 80 bushels, 
Shelled corn, 80 bushels. 
Straw, 2 tons, . 
Turnips, 1,300 bushels, 
Onions, 100 bushels, 



Produce Consumed. 

Asparagus, 

Apples, 124 bushels, 

Beef, 547 pounds, . 

Beets, 21 bushels, . 

Chicken, 6 pounds, . 

Cucumbers, 176 dozen, 

Cucumbers (pickling), 9 bushels, 

Cabbage, 32 heads, . 

Currants, 40 quarts. 

Eggs, 35 dozen, 

Fodder, 6 tons, 

Hay, 4 tons, 

Ice, 123 tons, . 

Lettuce, . 

Melons, 167 dozen, 

Milk, 5,7501 cans, 

Onions, 4 bushels, 

Pork, 3,045 pounds 

Peas, 54 1 bushels, 

Pears, 9 bushels, 

Peppers, 3^ bushels, 

Potatoes, 40 bushels, 

Raspberries, 188 quarts, . 

Shelled beans, 32| bushels 

String beans, 10 bushels, 

Sweet corn, 655 dozen, . 

Squash, 74 dozen, . 

Strawberries, 723 quarts, 

Tomatoes, 48 bushels, 

Turnips, 12 bushels, 

Veal, 739 pounds, . 




$80 00 

208 00 

224 00 

50 00 

480 00 

60 00 

5 00 

4 00 

13 00 

29 00 

48 00 

48 00 

24 00 

205 00 

75 00 



$7 20 


31 80 


38 29 


8 40 


1 08 


35 20 


6 75 


3 84 


4 00 


7 96 


12 00 


64 00 


246 00 


10 00 


300 60 


1,345 68 


4 00 


166 70 


65 40 


9 00 


4 72 


40 00 


22 56 


40 63 


7 50 


65 50 


14 80 


72 30 


24 00 


6 00 


83 50 



$3,093 00 



$2,749 41 



82 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Farm Sales. 



Blackberries, . 

Calves, 

Milk, 

Pigs, 

Plants (strawberry) , 

Strawberries, . 

Vegetables, 



Bull, one, . 

Boar, one, 

Breeding sows, seven, 

Cows, eighteen, 

Fowls, twenty-one, . 

Hogs, four, 

Horses, " Major, Jr., 11 

" Ned," 

pair bay horses, 
Mare, " Dollie, 11 
" Jennie, 11 
Oxen (yoke), . 
Pigs, twenty-two, 



Live Stock. 



$40 51 

1 75 

12 48 

43 00 

1 00 

458 48 

1 58 



$45 00 
25 00 

100 00 

825 00 
12 60 
96 00 

250 00 
75 00 

•250 00 

150 00 
50 00 

150 00 
66 00 



$558 80 



$2,094 60 



Farming Implements. 

Including wagons, machines, tools, etc., 



$2,285 89 



Summary. 



Produce on hand, 
Produce sold, . 
Produce consumed, 



Live stock, 

Agricultural implements, 



$3,093 00 

558 80 

2,749 41 



$6,401 21 

2,094 60 
2,285 89 

$10,781 70 



Respectfully submitted, 



A. G. LIVINGSTON, 

Farmer. 



1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



83 



SUMMAKY, 



Real Estate. 



Fifty-eight acres tillage, 
Thirty-six acres pasturage, . 
Brady Land, .... 
Willow Park Land, 



" Theodore Lyman Hall,' 
" Hillside Cottage," 
" Maple Cottage," . 
"Willow Park," . 
Chapel, . 

Farm, barn and sheds, 
Horse barn, . 
Willow Park hall, . 
Willow Park barn, 
Coal sheds, 



Buildings. 



$10,800 00 
1,800 00 
1,300 00 
1,500 00 



Personal Estate. 
Beds and bedding, inmates', .... 
Carriages and agricultural implements, 

Dry goods, 

Drugs, medicines and surgical instruments, 

Fuel and oil, 

Library, ... 

Live stock, 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . 

Other furniture, inmates 1 , .... 

Personal property, superintendent's department, 

Provisions and groceries, . 

Produce on hand, 



$15,400 00 



$37,000 00 

15,000 00 

3,500 00 

5,000 00 

3,700 00 

1,200 00 

2,000 00 

400 00 

100 00 

300 00 



$2,058 26 
2,285 89 

246 72 

300 00. 
1,578 86, 

578 00. 
2,094 60 
3,453 19 

487 65 
7,373 35 

792 45 
3,093 00 



Beady-made clothing, 2,051 23 



5,200 00 



$26,393 20 



Total, $109,993 20 

GEO. T. FAYERWEATHER, 

G. P. HEATH, Appraisers. 

A true copy. Attest : H. E. Swan, Supt. 

Westborough, Sept. 30. 1887. 



84 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



LIST OF SALARIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



H. E. Swan, superintendent, 

H. I. Skillings, assistant superintendent, . 

Mrs. H. E. Swan, matron, 

Mrs. S. W. Perry, matron, 

Mr. and Mrs. E. Howard, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Howe, charge of family, 

F. E. Corey, M. D., physician, . 

J. W. Clark, engineer, .... 

J. H. Cummings, overseer, 

J. T. Perkins, man of all work, 



Mrs. H. I. Skillings, teacher, 

Miss C. A. Dana, teacher, .... 

Miss Mary Mack, teacher, 

Miss S. F. Kenney, teacher, 

Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Parker, charge of family, 

Mrs. S. E. Leighton, seamstress, 

Mrs. E. L. Stowell, officers' cook, 

Miss Mabel Braley, laundress, 

L. V. Clough, watchmau, 

A. G. Livingston, farmer, .... 
W. H. Powers, carpenter, $1.50 per day. 
F. B. Stowell, farm hand, $25 per month. 

B. E. Robertson, farm hand, $25 per month. 



II 



,600 00 
500 00 
300 00 
300 00 
800 00 
700 00 
100 00 
900 00 
500 00 
400 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
700 00 
250 00 
260 00 
250 00 
400 00 
420 00 



1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



85 



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Superintendent, . 

Assistant Superintenc 

Matron, 

Master, 

Matron, 

Charge of family, 

Engineer, . 
Overseer, . 
Man of all work, 
Physician, . 

Seamstress, 
Laundress, . 

Officers' cook, 
Charge of family, 
Teacher, 

Carpenter, . 
Watchman, 
Farmer, 
Farm hand, 


fa 












H. E. Swan, . 
H. I. Skillings, . 
Mrs. H. E. Swan, 
S. W. Perry, 
Mrs. S. W. Perry, 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard, 
Mr. and Mrs. Howe, 
J. W. Clark, 
J. H. Cummings, . 
J. T. Perkins, 
F. E. Corey, M. D., 
Mrs. S. E. Leighton, 
Mrs. H. I. Skillings, 
Mrs. B. E. Robertson, 
Mrs. E. L. Stowell, 
Mr. and Mrs. Parker, 
Miss C. A. Dana, . 
Miss L. M. Hall, . 
Miss M. E. Mack, 
Miss S. F. Kenney, 
W. H. Powers, . 
L. V. Clough, 

A. G. Livingston, . 
F. B. Stowell, 

B. E. Robertson, . 



86 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



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1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



87: 



Schedule of Persons Temporarily Employed at the Lyman School 
for Boys, within the Year ending Sept. 30, 1887. 



Ministers, 




$150 00 


J. Hewitson, . 






Painting, 




284 69 


George T. Fayerweather 






Appraiser, 




40 00 


G. P. Heath, . 






u 




15 00 


M. Henry, 






Laborer, 




98 61 


J. M. Stone, . 






Carpenter, 




107 50 


F. L. Cochrane, 






" 




150 00 


Paul Dujay, 






Laborer, 




202 25 


C. A. Harrington, . 






Mason work, 


23 83 


George H. Woodman & ( 


:o., 




Piping, . ....'.. 


69 14 


Paul Varnum, . 






Stone work, 


37 50 


D. P. Day, 






Concreting, 


85 35 


W. T. Forbes, . 






Making deed, 


1 50 


Richard Hoey, . 






Laborer, 


60 


C. Fay, . 






Teaming stone, . 


52 00 


Peter Grady, . 






u u 


22 80 


J. W. Manning, 






Planting trees, . 


57 00 


G. M. Bailey, . 






Carpenter, . 


33 75 


J. B. Walker, . 






u 


24 00 


Walworth Manuf acturin| 


'Co. 




Piping, 


79 32 


Dr. Mead, 






Lecturer, . 


5 00 


M. M. Morse, ;. 






Repairing, . 


8 50 


William Sumner, . 






" ... 


8 00 


G. A. Barnard, 






Slating roof, 


56 91 


Dr. Winchester, 






Medical attendance, . 


25 00 


B. C. Hutchins, 






Laborer, 


21 00 


J. H. Brown, . 






Carpenter, . . 


12 50 


Hollis M. Orr, . 






" 


50 00 


M. S. Castner, . 






" 


50 00 


A. G. Peavey ,. 






" ... 


40 00 


George Hoyt & Co., 






Making awnings, 


52 00 


J. S. Nason, 






Mill work, . 


4 10 


George M. Tewksbury, 






Repairing, . 


1 25 


Henry Ball, 






Carpenter, . 


97 50 


P. Mathews, . 






Laborer, 


1 50 


J. A. Parker, . 




Making cider, 


17 72 












$1,985 82 



88 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



SUPERINTENDENTS. 



Date of 
Appointment. 


NAMES. 


Date of 
Retirement. 


1848, 


William R. Lincoln, . 






1853. 


1853, 


James M. Talcott, 








1857. 


1857, 


William E. Starr, 








1861. 


1861, 


Joseph A. Allen, 








1867. 


1867, 


Orville K. Hutchinson, 








1868. 


1868, 


Benjamin Evans, 






May, 


1873. 


May, 1873, 


Allen G. Shepherd, . 






Aug. 


1878. 


Aug. 1878, 


Luther H. Sheldon, . 






Dee. 


1880. 


Dec. 1880, 


Edmund T. Dooley, . 






Oct. 


1881. 


Oct. 1881, 


Joseph A. Allen, 






April, 


1885. 


July, 1885, 


Henry E. Swan, . 






Still in office. 



1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



89 



TRUSTEES. 



Names, Residences, Commissions and Retirement of the Trustees 
of the State Reform School, from the Commencement to the 
Present Time. 



Date of 






Date of 




NAMES. 


Residence. 




Commission. 






Retirement. 


1847, 


Nahum Fisher,* 


Westborough, . 


1849 


1847, 


John W. Graves, 


Lowell, . 


1849 


1847, 


Samuel Williston, 


Easthampton, . 


1853 


1847, 


Thomas A. Green,* . 


New Bedford, . 


1860 


1847, 


Otis Adams,* 


Grafton, . 


1851 


1847, 


George Denney,* 


Westborough, . 


1851 


1847, 


William P. Andrews,* 


Boston, . 


1851 


1849, 


William Livingston,* 


Lowell, . 


1851 


1849, 


Russell A. Gibbs,* 


Lanesborough, . 


1853 


1851, 


George H. Kuhn, 


Boston, 


1855 


1851, 


J. B. French,* . 


Lowell, . 


1854 


1851, 


Daniel H. Forbes, 


Westborough, . 


1854 


1851, 


Edward B. Bigelow,* 


Grafton, . 


1855 


1853, 


J. W. H. Page,* 


New Bedford, . 


1856 


1853, 


Harvey Dodge, . 


Sutton, 


1867 


1854, 


G. Rowland Shaw,* . 


Boston, . 


1856 


1854, 


Henry W. Cushman,* 


Bernardston, . 


1860 


1855, 


Albert H. Nelson,* . 


Woburn, . 


1855 


1855, 


Joseph A. Fitch, 


Hopkinton, 


1858 


1855, 


Parley Hammond, 


Worcester, 


1860 


1856, 


Simon Brown, . 


Concord, . 


1860 


1856, 


John A. Fayerweather, 


Westborough, . 


1859 


1857, 


Josiah H. Temple, . 


Framingham, . 


1860 


1858, 


Judson S. Brown, 


Fitchburg, 


1860 


1859, 


Theodore Lyman, 


Brookline, 


1860 


1860, 


George C. Davis,* 


Northborough, 


1873 


1860, 


Carver Hotchkiss, 


Shelburne, 


1863 


1860, 


Julius A. Palmer, 


Boston, 


1862 


1860, 


Henry Chickering, . 


Pittsfield, . 


1869 


1860, 


George W. Bentley, . 


Worcester, 


1861 


1860, 


Alden Leland, . 


Holliston, 


1864 


1861, 


Pliny Nickerson, 


Boston, . 


1868 


1861, 


Samuel G. Howe,* . 


Boston, 


1863 


1862, 


Benjamin Boynton,* . 


Westborough, . 


1864 


1863, 


J. H. Stephenson, 


Boston, 


1866 


1863, 


John Ayres, 


Charlestown, . 


1867 



Deceased. 



90 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct.'87, 



Names, Residences, etc., of Trustees — Concluded. 



Date of 






Date of 




NAMES. 


Kesidence. 




Commission. 






Retirement. 


1864, 


A. E. Goodnow, 


Worcester, 


1874 


1864, 


Isaac Ames, 






Haverhill, 


1865 


1865, 


Jones S. Davis, . 






Holyoke, . 


1868 


1866, 


Joseph A. Pond,* 






Brighton, . 


1867 


1867, 


Stephen G. Deblois, 






Boston, . 


1878 


1868, 


John Ayres, 






Medford, . 


1874 


1868, 


Harmon Hall, . 






Saugus, . 
Bridgewater, . 


1871 


1868, 


L. L. Goodspeed, 






1872 


1869, 


E. A. Hubbard, . 






Springfield, 


1877 


1871, 


Lucius W. Pond, 






Worcester, 


1875 


1871, 


John W. Olmstead, 






Boston, . 


1873 


1872, 


Moses H. Sargent, 






Newton, . 


1877 


1873, 


A. S. Woodworth, 






Boston, . 


1876 


1873, 


Edwin B. Harvey, 






Westborough, . 


1878 


1874, 


W. H. Baldwin, 






Boston, 


1876 


1875, 


John L. Cummings, 






Ashburnham, . 


1879 


1876, 


Jackson B. Swett, 






Haverhill, 


1878 


1877, 


Samuel R. Heywood, 






Worcester, 


1879 


1877, 


Milo Hildreth, . 






Northborough, 


1879 


1878, 


Lyman Belknap,* 






Westborough, . 


1879 


1878, 


Franklin Williams,* 






Boston, 


1879 


1878, 


Robert Couch, . 






Newburyport, . 


1879 


1879, 


John T. Clark, . 






Boston, . 


1879 


1879, 


M. J. Flatley, . 






Boston, 


1881 


1879, 


Adelaide A. Calkins, 






Springfield, 


1880 


1879, 


Lyman Belknap, 






Westborough, . 


1884 


1879, 


Anne B. Richardson, 






Lowell, . 


1886 


1879, 


Milo Hildreth, . 






Northborough, 


Still in office: 


1879, 


George W. Johnson, 






Brookfield, 


" « 


1879, 


Samuel R. Heywood, 




Worcester, 


it it 


1880, 


Elizabeth C. Putnam, 




Boston, . 


« " 


1881, 


Thomas Dwight, 




Boston, . 


1884 


1884, 


M.H.Walker, . 






Westborough, . 


Still in office. 


1884, 


J. J. O'Connor, . 






Holyoke, . 


u 


1886, 


Elizabeth G. Evans, 






Boston, . 


" " 


1887, 


Chas. L. Gardner, 






Palmer, . 


" 



* Deceased. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



STATE INDTJSTEIAL SCHOOL FOE GlELS 



LANCASTER. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 



To the Honorable Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools : 

Ladies and Gentlemen : — I submit to you the report 
of the State Industrial School for Girls, for the year ending 
Sept. 30, 1887. 

The past year has been one of unusual activity. The time 
of those in charge of the school has not only been fully occu- 
pied, but plenty of work has been found for all of the girls, 
which we believe to be necessary to their salvation. The 
more fully they are occupied the more interested they become 
in their work, and the less they think about themselves and 
their former lives. 

It has been our endeavor to make the housekeeper's de- 
partment practically a cooking-school, and thus far we have 
met with good success. For instance , girls have been given 
the responsibility of cooking the entire dinner, canning fruit, 
making jelly, pickles, etc. One girl of thirteen years, who 
had never made bread before coming to the school, was 
awarded the first premium for bread by the Lancaster 
Farmers' Club. 

The needed qualifications for a successful housekeeper and 
teacher in the kitchen are more varied than in any other 
department, She needs not only culture, but a keen insight 
into everything which will interest and stimulate those under 
her charge, and also needs to understand all kinds of practi- 
cal housekeeping in order to teach the girls what is most 
important for them to understand before leaving the school. 

The girls have worked on the farm and garden more or 
less, and enjoy the freedom of out-of-door labor. 

When not engaged on the farm or elsewhere, they have 
been kept busy in the sewing-room. Nearly seven hundred 



94 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

dresses have been made, and underclothing in proportion. 
We have sent ont 112 different girls, most of whom have 
been provided with a more or less complete outfit. 

There has been no serious difficulty in discipline. We see 
very little hysteria, and there is more self-government. We 
are working toward a cheerful obedience, as we are fully 
convinced that authority alone cannot enforce good disci- 
pline. 

During the summer some of the girls who were out at 
places were permitted to visit the school, as a reward for 
good conduct. Several came to celebrate the Fourth of 
July, and had it been their own home could not have seemed 
more delighted. 

The system of placing out girls in families is unchanged. 
While the result has not been all that could be desired, it 
has been sufficiently good to prove that it is better than 
keeping them in an institution after they are fitted to be 
placed out. 

There have been few changes among the officers. Those 
who have come among us to fill vacancies have been able to 
carry the work on in a very satisfactory manner. We have 
great reason to be thankful for the real interest all have 
taken in the girls and in the general work of the school. 

Dr. O'Callaghan has visited the school on Thursday of 
each week, and is not only faithful and successful as a physi- 
cian, but has an excellent influence among the girls. 

We wish to acknowledge the receipt of Christmas cards 
and newspapers from kind friends of the school. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. L. BRACKETT, 

Superintendent. 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 95 



STATISTICS. 



During this year there have been within the school for more or 

less time, 152 

In the school Sept. 30, 1886, ...... 70 

Returned to the school, having been placed out in former 

years, 44 

New commitments, 38 



The following disposition was made of these girls : 



Of the above there have been sent out once, . . .85 

" " " " twice, . .15 

" " " " three times, . . 11 

" " " " four times, . . 1 



152 



In the school Sept. 30, 1886, 58 

In place, . . .57 

With friends behaving well, . . . . . . .5 

" " behavior doubtful, .1 

Married, 5 

Almshouse, or at board, 2 

Reformatory Prison for Women (one committed by court), . 4 

Runaway, . 11 

Discharged, 5 

Died, ........... 1 

Of age, 3 

Total, . . — 152 

During the year there have been sent out from the school, . 112 

There have been returned (including the 44 from former 

years' placing), *72 

for illness, 13 

" change of place, . . . . . . .16 

" a visit (during absence of employer) , . ... 2 

" unsatisfactory conduct, ...... 26 

" theft, . . . . . 3 

" other bad conduct, 12 



72 



96 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Whole number who have been in custody of the school dor 

ing the year, 

Of whom there have attained their majority, 
Discharged by vote for good conduct, 

" nearly 21 years of age, 

" as unfit subjects for the school, 
Died, 

Total who have come of age, been discharged, or died, 



Remaining in the Industrial School, 
At work in families, 

With friends, 

Married in former years, not yet 21, 
Married this year, .... 
At board or in almshouses, 
In State Primary School, . 
In prison former years, and not yet of age, 
Sent to prison this year, .... 
Runaway former years and not recovered, 
Runaway former years, said to be doing well 
Runaway this year, ..... 
Total in custody Sept. 30, 1887, 



Of these there may be said to be behaving well, outside. 

Doubtful, 

Badly, . 



273 



24 
5 
4 

4 
1 



38 



58 
91 
19 
11 
14 

3 

1 

5 

4 
16 

1 
12 
— 235 

122 
14 
41 



177 



In the school, returned, 

In the school all this year and not yet placed out, . 
Committed during the year and remaining, . 



23 

8 
27 



Of those committed this year 

31 could read and write. 
3 " not write. 



58 235 



4 could neither read nor write. 



11 attended church regularly 
26 " " seldom. 



1 never attended church. 



3 were 12 years of age. 

4 " 13 
8 " 14 



12 were 15 years of 
10 " 16 
1 " 17 



28 born in Massachusetts. 
3 " Connecticut. 
1 " Pennsylvania. 
1 " Illinois. 



2 born in Nova Scotia. 
1 " England. 
1 " Canada. 
1 Unknown. 



1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



97 



15 were of Irish parentage. 

10 " American " 
5 " French " 
2 " German " 



1 was of English parentage. 

1 " Dutch 

2 parentage unknown. 

2 colored American parentage. 



Suffolk bounty, 

Middlesex 

Essex 

Bristol 

Hampden 

Plymouth 

Stubbornness, . 

Larceny, . 

Vagrancy, 

Idle and disorderly 

Lewdness, 

Orphans, . 

One parent living, 



6 

9 


Berkshire County, . 
Franklin " 


1 


Worcester " 


4 


Norfolk, 


5 

1 


Hampshire, " 



19 I Idle, vicious and vagrant, 

7 j Assault and battery, 

4 I Fornication, 

1 j Forgery, . . . . 

2 I 

2 I Both parents living, 

17 I 



1!) 



98 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY 



Real Estate 








Chapel, . $3,000 00 




House Xo. 1, 








S.250 00 




Xo. 2, .... 








8,500 oo 




Xo. 4, 








9,000 oo 




Xo. 5, 








3,000 00 




Superintendent's house. 








3,000 oo 




Hosiery shop (now storeroom). 








300 oo 




Farm house and barn. . 








1,500 oo 




Large barn. .... 








4.5oo oo 




Silo, 








40<> oo 




Storehouse, .... 








450 00 




Old barn, .... 








150 00 




Wood house, 








150 00 




Ice house, .... 








100 00 




Storehouse No. 3. 








25 00 




Piggery, 








100 00 




Reservoir house, . 








100 00 




Xew hen house, 








10 00 




Farm, 17G acres, . 








7,000 00 




Wood lot, 10 acres, 








200 00 








$49,765 00 




Personal Property. 




Property in Xo. 1, ... . $97249 




Xo. 2, 




924 13 




Xo. 4, 




. 1,319 65 




Xo. 5, 




524 85 




superintendent's house, 




934 CO 




chapel and library, . 




625 oo 




Provisions and groceries, 




1,067 88 




Dry goods, 




725 hi 




Fuel, ...... 




1,248 (il 








|8,342 37 








Amount carried forward, 



58,107 37 



1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



99 



Amount brought forward, 




$58,107 37 


Valuation of stock, .... 


. |1,636 50 




Valuation of horses, .... 


635 00 




Tools and carriages, .... 


. 1,450 75 




Produce of farm on hand. . 


. 2,369 50 


$64,199 12 



SOLON WILDER, 
ANDREW J. BANCROFT, 

Appraisers. 



State of Mass., Worcester, ss., Oct. 3, 1887. Then personally appeared the 
above-named Solon Wilder and AndreAv J. Bancroft, and made oath that the above 
appraisal by them signed is, to the best of their knowledge and belief, correct. 
Before me, 

NICHOLAS FROST, 

Justice of the Peace. 



Produce Consumed. 



1887. 

Milk, 32,495 quarts, 
Beef, 6,018 pounds, 
Pork, 5,584 pounds, 
Veal, 80 pounds, . 
Beans, 11 bushels, 
Peas, 29 bushels, . 
Tomatoes, 60 bushels, 
Beets, 20 bushels, 
Turnips, 15 bushels, 
Asparagus, 18 bushels, 
Potatoes, 40 bushels, 
Apples, 10 bushels, 
Pears, 10 bushels, 
Cucumbers, . 
Rhubarb, \ ton, 
Ice, 50 tons, . 
Sweet corn, . 
Strawberries, 65 quarts 
Currants, 125 quarts, . 
Chickens, 3051 pounds, 
Eggs, 499 dozen, . 
Hay, 6 tons, . 
Rowen, 4 tons, 



$974 85 


421 26 


335 04 


6 40 


11 00 


29 00 


30 00 


10 00 


5 00 


36 00 


40 00 


5 00 


10 00 


15 00 


25 00 


100 00 


50 00 


6 50 


12 50 


45 82 


99 80 


96 00 


24 00 


$2,388 17 



100 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Produce Sold and Receipts sent to State Treasurer. 



Oct., 


1886. 


Apples, . 








|14 87 






Board, . 






21 50 


Nov., 


1886. 


Apples and pigs, 








11 75 


Dec., 


1886. 


Milk, . 








4 40 


Jan., 


1887. 


Board, . 








24 00 


Feb. and March, 1887. Apples, 








34 00 


April, 


1887. 


Apples, . 
Board, . 








116 85 
24 00 


June, 


1887. 


Calves and pigs, 








54 00 


July, 


1887. 


Calves, . 
Board, . 








47 50 
24 00 


Sept., 


1887. 


Calves and milk, 








24 46 



$401 33 



Produce <>x Hand. 



Ensilage, 90 tons, 
English hay, 40 tons. 
Meadow hay, 2 tons, 
Oats, 8 tons, . 
Corn and stover, o\ ton 
Pop corn, 
Squash, . 

Mangels, 30 tons, . 
Rutabagas, 1 ton, . 
Beets, 175 bushels, 
Carrots, 10 bushels. 
Parsnips, 30 bushels, 
Beans, 20 bushels, 
Peas, 9 bushels, . 
Apples, 175 bushels, 
( 'abbagcs, 375, 
Celery, . 

Pickles, 5 barrels, 
Vinegar, 26 barrels, 
Lumber, 
Manure, 50 cords, 



|450 00 
640 00 

20 00 
100 00 

30 00 

25 00 

45 00 

300 oo 

10 00 

80 00 

5 00 

15 00 

50 00 

9 00 

75 00 

21 50 
5 00 

25 00 
loi 00 

60 00 
300 00 



12,3(59 50 



1887.] 



PUBLIC 1 DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



101 



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102 PRIMAEY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



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„ 


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1887.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



103 





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104 PRIMARY AXD REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Schedule of Persons Employed and Amount Paid Each. 



L. L. Brackett 


Superintendent, . 


$999 96 


N. C. Brackett. 








Farmer and Steward, . 


050 04 


Anna Stewart, . 








Matron, 


849 92 


C. J. Bean, 












DSH 02 


R. M. Rice, 












295 08 


L. E. Yates, . 








"■ 




829 36 


C. E. Sawin, . 








Sub. Matron, 




14 30 


E. M. Hamlin. . 








" 




34 49 


L. E. Greene, . 








Vacancy Officer, 




307 06 


S. E. Stowe, . 








Teacher, 




274 98 


Anna A. Stewart. 












292 69 


Addie M. Knight, 








" 




125 00 


Catherine Barton. 








.. 




118 05 


L. B. Barton, . 








" 




75 00 


A. J. Wheeler, 








Sub. Teacher, 




34 49 


S. R. Houghton, 








Housekeeper, 




191 78 


Margarel Torry, 












202 47 


J. P. Dunton, '. 












255 34 


Ellen Bangs, . 








i. 




104 15 


Julia Mclntire, 








u 




70 5(> 


Emma Talbot, . 








" 




181 88 


H. T. Spaulding, 








" 




lot 83 


II. lUirnham. . 








Sub. Housekeeper, 


19 70 


(;. E. Bangs, . 








" 


72 01 


M A. Pearson, 








i. .t 


10 90 


Mary V. O'Callaghs 


n. 






Physician, . 


200 04 


(i. L. Tobey, . 








•• 




35 oo 


C. B. Hamlin, . 








Foreman, . 




540 00 


J.C.Rice, 








Laborer, 




300 00 


F. M. Sampson. 








" 




241 94 


M. W. Sampson. 








" 




70 00 


E. M. Hamlin. . 








n 




77 71 


A. A. Woodbury, 








.t 




76 oo 


Martin Dolphin. 








" 




99 :n> 


Francis A. Hamlin. 












37 oo 


L. W. Morey, . 








( Jlergyman. 




15 00 


(J. A I. Bartol. . 








ti 




15 00 


A. P. Marvin, . 








» 




5 OO 


George F. Pratt. 








u 




10 00 


Richard Ward. 








u 




20 oo 


E. L. Chute, . 








4; 




5 OO 


1). B. Scott, 












25 oo 


J. F. Morton. . 












5 oo 














j|7,245 81 



1887.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 105 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Industrial School : 

During the past year the duties of the physician have been 
about the same as in the two previous years. 

We have had but one case of contagious disease — dipth- 
eria — and this patient made a good recovery. Ten girls 
have entered the school suffering from specific trouble. 
These have all yielded to treatment, and at my last weekly 
visit there was no sign of active disease in any of these 
cases. 

Five girls have come to us in pregnant condition (two by 
commitment — three returned). Four of these have been 
sent to the almshouse, and one placed with friends. 

One young girl, who had been in consumption over a year, 
was allowed to return to her home in Cambridge ; thence 
transferred to the Home for Incurables, where she died ten 
weeks ago. 

During the months of August and September there have 
been several cases of a painful intestinal trouble at House 
No. 2 — due probably to some defect in the water supply. 
It is very necessary that this matter receive prompt attention, 
for should any serious outbreak occur the means for caring 
for severe cases are limited ; since in none of the houses is 
there a single room where we could isolate our sick. 

In a school of voun<>- tnrls, most of them on the brink of 

*J ~ CD 

womanhood, there are more than the ordinary number of 



106 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. '87. 

sore throats, colds, stomach and uterine derangements, — 
but the prompt attendance bestowed by the officers on 
these slighter ailments usually result in a quick return to 
health. 

The physical condition of the inmates is now in a satis- 
factory condition. 

I have the honor to remain, 

Yours, very respectfully, 

MARY V. O'CALLAGHAX. 

Worcester, Oct. 10, 1887. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT. No. 18. 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



State Primary and Reform Schools 



WITH THE 



ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE RESIDENT OFFICERS, 



For the Year ending Sept. 30, 1888. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 
18 Post Office Square. 

1889. 



Cflmmontoealt^ of Passatjwtsrfis, 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL AT MONSON. 

To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools 
respectfully present their Tenth Annual Report. 

The work of the State for its dependent children is largely 
that of draining off from the cities the children of those who 
have been worsted in the battle of life, and planting them in 
country homes which have been depleted by the steady 
stream of young people to the cities. In the country there 
is not only room, but a real need, for these unfortunate little 
strangers ; and many a child can find a useful calling in the 
quiet walks of the country, who would surely go under in 
the rush and competition of a crowded city. The State 
Board of Lunacy and Charity had last year nearly twelve 
hundred such in its care ; and many of these children , by 
being placed at board or at service in country households, 
never see the inside of an institution. But some of those 
who come into the care of the State cannot be so provided 
for : those whose parents are likely to be able soon to take 
them home need only a temporary provision ; others, who 
are taken from degraded or criminal surroundings, often 
need a period of education and restraint to tit them for life 
in the world ; and others, again, — and in every community 
there are many such, — through bodily or mental infirmity, 
need the permanent shelter of an institution. For these two 
classes, — i. e., children needing temporary provision and 



4 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

education, and those needing a more permanent refuge, — 
the State makes provision in the Primary School at 
Monson. 

The Primary School is situated upon a farm of two hun- 
dred and thirty-five acres, in the county of Hampden. The 
air and view are line ; but the large- congregate buildings, 
which were originally constructed as an almshouse, are ill 
adapted for their present use. The children are divided 
into four groups : the infant department, numbering about 
forty-nine, includes all those under eight years of age ; the 
girls' department numbers thirty-four, their ages ranging 
from eight to seventeen (there are, however, only a few 
over fourteen) ; another division is of ninety-five boys, 
between the ages of eight and twelve ; and a fourth of 
ninety -five boys, between the ages of twelve and seventeen. 
These divisions sleep in separate dormitories, and play in 
separate yards ; but they take their meals together, and 
meet freely at work and school. 

The clay begins at half-past five, and breakfast is at half- 
past six. Then boys and girls, with the exception of those 
who attend the morning session of school, take part, under 
the direction of officers, in the house and farm work. Twenty 
girls and eighty-two boys are employed about the house, 
making beds, washing dishes, scrubbing floors, or helping in 
the bakery or kitchen ; seventeen girls and thirteen boys 
work in the sewing-room and tailor shop ; two boys work 
in the shoe shop, and fifty in the barn and on the farm. 
Except that the routine of the school must be regular, there 
is little formality or drill in their way of life, and they are 
allowed a good deal of freedom about the grounds. In the 
winter, they slide and coast, and sometimes skate ; in the 
summer, they go berrying and swimming, and several times 
a week all through the year the officers take them on walks 
outside the grounds. Their playrooms are provided with 
games for recreation on winter evenings, and every few 
weeks the teachers help them to get up entertainments of 
singing, recitations, etc. There is next to nothing of the 
repression which is the bane of institution life ; and when 
the Trustees visit the school, the children appeal to them 
freely with their individual interests and needs. 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT -No. 18. 5 

Considering the limitations of the children, the work 
done in the school-rooms is really excellent. Sessions of 
three hours each are held twice a day, the afternoon session 
being attended by those who have been busy at other work 
in the morning. There are eight rooms, carefully graded 
from the kindergarten to the grammar ; and it is interest- 
ing to go from room to room, and see the steady progress of 
the children and the thoroughness of the training ; and 
that in spite of the fact that the best children are being 
constantly placed out. The Trustees feel that even here, 
however, there is room for improvement ; and they are 
anxious to introduce in some degree those methods of indus- 
trial training which are being so successfully employed 
elsewhere. They hope soon to start a carpenter shop, where 
the children's faculties can be trained by the use of tools ; and 
gymnastic exercises they believe might also be a valuable 
addition to the curriculum. 

The conditions of life in the Primary School are purposely 
kept very simple ; the playrooms are dingy, cheerless 
places, the food is of the plainest, and the clothing far from 
luxurious ; for the Trustees desire above all things not to 
accustom the children to indulgences which the conditions of 
their after-lives can rarely satisfy. Nevertheless, it is difficult 
to know just where to draw the line between a simplicity which 
will educate them in hardiness, and a meagreness which will 
stint or at best fail to develop their faculties. The great 
trouble with these children is that they lack energy and 
initiative. It is evident enough, to any one watching them at 
their play, that they have not the high spirits or fertile 
invention of children of the more fortunate classes. The 
Trustees have, therefore, thought it well to try giving them 
warmer clothing and a more varied and nourishing diet, 
hoping thereby to induce a greater energy of constitution. 
This has been one element of the increased per capita cost 
to be noted later. 

Both the Superintendent and the Matron have labored 
with devotion to forward the best interests of the school ; 
they study the individual characters and needs of the children 
to a degree that seems wonderful in so large an institution ; 
and, while their administration is a conservative one, they 



6 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

co-operate effectively with the Trustees in their efforts to 
improve the methods of the school. 

The health of the children has been good,* only one 
death and five cases of serious illness having occurred dur- 
ing the year. The constant oversight and attention of the 
resident physician has doubtless done much to prevent 
illness, and has been invaluable in the treatment of the many 
chronic cases. The Trustees, and the children, too, should 
feel a debt of gratitude to Dr. Sarah Wilbur, who for nearly 
two years served them with skill and devotion. Dr. C. L. 
Haynes, who succeeded her in August, has already showed 
conscientiousness and efficiency in her work. 

The hospital building, which was a dingy, ill-arranged 
place, has this year been remodelled, and will now provide 
the poor little cripples and invalids who live there with airy 
rooms and healthful sanitary conditions. These alterations 
will cost about one thousand dollars ; they will be paid for 
in large part from this year's appropriation. 

The one crying defect of the institution is, that it is organ- 
ized upon the congregate, instead of the family, system. 
Children cannot be properly developed while they are dealt 
with in regiments ; they need the variety and the closer 
personal relations which can only be attained in institution 
life by dividing them into small groups, each with its sepa- 
rate house and officers. When the Primary School children 
are seen en masse at their meals or at chapel, they strike 
one as a pitiable collection of humanity ; but in the school- 
room or playground, where one can individualize them, they 
seem fairly intelligent and attractive, as compared with 
other children of their class. The schools at Westborough 
and Lancaster are already organized upon the family plan ; 
and, in comparing them with the Primary School, one can 
see the marked advantages of the family system. The 
Trustees are, however, unable to introduce this system at 
Monson, for the congregate buildings cannot profitably be 
remodelled, and it would be too expensive to discard them. 
They suggest, however, that one family house might be 

* To prevent contagion from sore eyes, the pegs in the lavatories are numbered, 
and the towels are marked with corresponding numbers ; this reduces the chance of 
the children's using each others' towels. 



1,888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 7 

provided, where the girls might be trained by better meth- 
ods. This would involve no great outlay, and the vacated 
dormitory could be used for the boys' carpenter shop. 

The Primary School opened the year with three hundred 
and sixteen inmates, and closed with three hundred and 
fourteen. The average was three hundred and twenty-one, — 
a smaller number than ever before. There were — 

In the school Oct. 1, 1887, children, 300 

" " adults, . .. • . . . . 16 

Received from State Almshouse, children, . . . . .43 

adults, . . . . . . 5 

" Supt. Indoor Poor, neglected, ..... 21 

" " dependent, . . . . .10 

" " juvenile offenders, ... 48 

" Lyman School, 3 

" State Workhouse, 4 

Returned, having been placed out previous years, . , . .45 
" " current year, . . . .43 

Total, 538 

Of these the following disposition has been made : — 

Discharged by the State Board of Lunacy and Charity, ... 33 

Placed out at board, . . . . 21 

" " service, 164 

" at Children's Hospital, . . . . . . . 1 

" " Deaf and Dumb Asylum, Hartford, 1 

Transferred to State Workhouse, 3 

Died, 1 

Remaining in the school, ......... 314 

Total, 538 

The children who are boarded out are all under ten years 
of age. The cost of these is $1.86 per week. It is suggested 
that, if the practice were adopted of providing clothing for 
children over that age who are yet too small to earn their 
own way, homes might be found for a number of children 
who must now be kept in the institution. An additional 
five hundred dollars to the boarding-out appropriation would 
enable the Trustees to early out this plan, and thus reduce 
still further the numbers in the school. 

In rescuing children from bad homes, the danger should 



8 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

always be kept in mind of needlessly breaking all natural 
family ties. A girl of ten or twelve years ma} 7 often be 
cruelly wronged by taking from her all responsibility for 
her little brothers and sisters ; while, by taking pains, it might 
often be arranged that they should be boarded in one family, 
or, where that is impracticable, they might at least be placed 
in the same neighborhood. 

The decreasing numbers in the school have not of course 
led to a proportionate decrease of expense. The total 
appropriation for the year was $54,000. Of this, $4,000 
was for boarding out, $17,000 for salaries, and $33,000 for 
current expenses. The per capita cost was $3.07. This 
increased rate is due partly to the children's better living, 
and partly to the improvements in the hospital. 

The Trustees must ask this year for an extra appropria- 
tion of $4,000, to replace three of the boilers ; they have 
been in use for eighteen years, and they will barely last 
through the season. They expect also to ask for an extra 
appropriation for the girls' family house before mentioned, 
an exact estimate for which has not yet been made. They 
will also ask for $4,500 for boarding out. And, in consider- 
ation for the contemplated improvements in the educational 
department, they ask that the appropriation for salaries 
and for current expenses may be the same as last year. 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS, 

WESTBOROUGH. 



In their previous reports, the Trustees have described in 
detail the family system on which the Lyman School since 
its reorganization has been conducted. Another year's expe- 
rience has but confirmed their belief in the merits of the 
system. 

They can this year report some beginnings in the way of 
industrial education. 

Of late years, the farm work, the house work, the chair 
shop and the school-room have been the only occupations ; 
and chair-seating is work which requires so little skill, that, 
except in so far as it teaches industry, it should hardly be 
considered educational at all. We have had during the 
winter months a cobbling department, a printing press and 
a carpenter shop. In the shoe shop two boys worked for 
six hours a day. Six or eight boys worked at the printing 
press for six hours a day, and in all fourteen were instructed 
within the year. Several of these have done well, and one 
is now placed out with a printer. In the carpenter shop, 
thirty boys worked each one morning a week, and, by alter- 
nating, a large number of those in the school were thus able 
to gain some facility in the use of tools. One or two 
acquired considerable skill. This training will doubtless 
enable some boys who would never have been contented on 
a farm to secure an opening at their trade. 

But it should not be primarily the aim of industrial train- 
ing to turn out printers or carpenters ; it should rather be 
to effect, by the education of the mind and hand, a general 
awakening of the faculties. Most of our boys, as they leave 
the school, must still be placed upon farms ; for, through 



10 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

the disuse of the apprentice system, there is rarely any 
other opening for those who do not return to their homes. 
But, however humble may be their avocations, we should 
give to all, as far as may be, the advantage of a mind trained 
to observe and reason. To what extent industrial training 
can develop these faculties in boys of the class with whom 
we are dealing, is a problem not yet worked out ; but those 
who have intelligently studied the subject believe that such 
methods will prove of the greatest advantage. 

The Trustees feel that perhaps a somewhat longer deten- 
tion than has been customary of late might be beneficial. 
It has been their policy to release on probation, after about 
a year in the school, every boy who could possibly be 
placed; and the overcrowded condition of the institution, 
joined with their wish to keep down expense, has led them 
to use great pressure upon the Superintendent to accom- 
plish this. But, where life-long habits are to be unlearned, 
time must be a chief element ; and in the future the Trus- 
tees will probably try the experiment of keeping boys in the 
school for fifteen or eighteen months. 

As far as concerns the conduct of the boys inside the 
institution, the success is encouraging ; their fine health and 
spirits lead them to little abuse their freedom, and they are 
controlled with few punishments. A real spirit of energy 
and ambition seems to pervade the school ; and any one, 
judging from the pleasant faces and plentiful crop of good 
resolutions, would believe that here is a reform school 
indeed. But, of course, the real battleground lies outside 
the institution, and our chief difficulty is the old one, — viz., 
how to effect a permanent change of character in the shift- 
less and dishonest ; how to convert such boys into men who, 
when they stand on their own resources, will meet life with 
courage. Judged by this standard, we dare claim for the 
Lyman School only a moderate success. 

The number of boys released on probation was . .91 
Of these there were — 



Allowed to go borne, 31 

Placed out, GO 



91- 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 11 

Of the sixty placed out — 

There have been returned, 8 

Kan away, . . . 14 

Done well (or at least kept their places), ... 38 

— GO 

It is impossible to ascertain the conduct of those who are with 
their parents, as their probation is hardly more than nom- 
inal ; though in theory under the care of the visiting agency, 
the supervision is so slight that they are rarely returned 
to the school unless re-arrested by the police for offences 
against the law. For all our boys our probation system 
must be acknowledged to be defective. There are but four 
agents for the entire State ; and, as their duties are to attend 
the trials of all juvenile offenders, as well as to visit boys 
who are in places, it is often impossible for them to perform 
the latter duty more than once a year. One of our best 
agents says that, with more frequent visiting, he could pre- 
vent a large proportion of the runaways. And not only do 
boys need supervision, — masters sometimes need it, too ; 
for a farmer's object in taking a boy is usually to secure 
cheap labor, and it cannot be expected that he is always 
careful of the boy's interest ; and many a one who now runs 
away because he is discouraged, or perhaps is having a hard 
time, might, by some friendly intervention, have his griev- 
ances righted, or be counselled to a better mind. There is 
certainly need that the State should provide an officer who 
shall have time for this important work. 

Mr. Henry E. Swan, who for three years has been Super- 
intendent of the Lyman School, retired last July. The 
Trustees felt that in him they lost a conscientious officer, 
whose services in carrying out the new methods of the 
school had been of great value. His successor, Mr. Theo- 
dore F. Chapin, brings to his work trained abilities and wide 
experience in other departments of education ; and the Trus- 
tees believe that his administration gives promise of more 
than ordinary success. 



12 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



There have been in the school a total of 255* inmates. 
There were — 



l the school Sept. 30, 1887, . 




118 


ew commitments, . . . 




99 
2 


ecommitted, ..... 
Returned from places, 


8 


" by police, .... 


3 




voluntarily, 


7 




" by State Board, . 


5 




" by institution officers, 


. 13 






— 


36 



Total in the school during the year, . 



255' 



The disposition of these boys has been as follows : — 

. 142 



In the school Sept. 30, 1888, 
On probation to parents, 
" others, 



Discharged to the Primary School, . 
" Mass. Reformatory, . 

" State Workhouse, 

" Overseer of the Poor, 

■" leave the State, . 

Ran away, 



31 
60 

— 91 
3 

6 
2 
2 
3 
6 

— 22 



Total, 



255 



The Willow Park building, for which the Legislature 
granted a deficiency appropriation of $625, has proved 
admirably fitted to its use. But the increased numbers in 
the school have more than kept pace with the increased 
accommodations, and, in spite of them, the school has for 
two years been overcrowded. In October, 1886, there were 
ninety boys, and provision for only eighty-four ; and the 
winter brought a large increase of numbers. Willow Park 
was then bought ; but in October, 1887, the school numbered 
one hundred and eighteen , and was again overcrowded ; 
and, as then anticipated, a continued increase forced the 
Trustees last winter to apply to the Legislature for provision 
for a fifth family. For that purpose they asked and obtained 
the sum of $8,000. With this they are now building a sim- 



* This represents 205 individuals. 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 13 

pie wooden house for the Superintendent and the extra 
officers, and Lyman Hall, which now accommodates the 
Superintendent and one family of boys, will then be enabled 
to provide for two families ; a few slight alterations will 
make the quarters of these two families as distinct as if they 
were in separate houses. This plan was adopted in prefer- 
ence to building a new house for boys, as being cheaper, 
and also as promising a more efficient administration. 

The Trustees hope to purchase an adjoining estate known 
as the Wilson farm. This property of about seventy-two 
acres, with a house and farm buildings in good repair, will 
cost $5,500. This investment will be a source of but slight 
increase of expense, as the school already hires the land for 
pasturage and other produce at the rate of two hundred 
dollars per annum, and the buildings will prove useful if the 
school again outgrows its accommodations. Whether or not 
it will be necessary to apply to the Legislature for money to 
remodel the house will of course depend upon the number of 
commitments. 

The appropriation for the year was $30,900, of which 
$12,500 was for salaries, and $18,400 for current expenses; 
$1,623.75 was returned to the treasury from the sale of farm 
produce, etc. The actual per capita cost is $4.13; this is, 
no doubt, a high rate, but the Trustees believe that the 
excellences of the school are worth paying for, and that the 
public money has not been wasted. 



14 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 

LANCASTER. 



The State Industrial School at Lancaster has had under its 
care during the year just ended a total of 285 girls ; only 
157 of these, however, have been cared for in the institution, 
the remaining 128 having been out on probation either in 
their own homes or at service in country families. These 
outside girls are, as will be seen, as truly a part of the school 
as are those who are still upon the grounds. 

The school is situated upon a farm of 176 acres. The 
inmates are lodged in four separate family houses, each with 
its own staff of officers. This division allows of a careful 
classification within the school, — a classification depending 
upon the character and previous history of the girls, and not 
upon age or conduct within the institution. As there is no 
promotion from house to house, a perfect isolation is thus 
secured of those Avho might otherwise contaminate the more 
innocent. 

During eight months of the year the girls get up at half-past 
five ; and while kitchen and dining-room girls are preparing 
breakfast, the others have an hour in the school-room. After 
breakfast they all scatter to their various household occupa- 
tions ; and any one visiting the institution at seven or eight 
o'clock in the morning will be met by a busy and varied 
scene. All the housework is done by the girls, who, through 
a constant rotation, arc trained to efficiency in all the varied 
departments, the aim being to fit them to become useful 
members of society when they leave the school, and not 
simply to get the housework done. To this end the Trus- 
tees are careful that the household appliances shall be of the 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 15 

most simple nature, that the girls may learn to contend with 
the inconveniences and discomforts which they will find in 
the ordinary farmhouse, and for which the steam heating and 
set washtubs of many institutions might easily unfit them. 
By half-past eight or nine o'clock all those who are not 
busied in the kitchen or laundry collect in the sewing-room, 
where are made all the clothes for the establishment ; every 
girl thus learns plain sewing .and knitting, and some learn 
besides to work on the machine, and to cut by chart and fit 
their own or each others' dresses. In the afternoon, from 
half-past three to a quarter of six, is the second session of 
school. The standard of schooling is necessarily not high, 
for most of the girls are very ignorant, and some are lazy or 
dull ; and the family system does not allow of grading. 
This evil it is difficult to remedy ; and, in the nature of the 
case, the whole emphasis of their education must be laid 
upon the industrial departments. After supper they play 
croquet or tennis, or sometimes collect in the sewing-room 
to read aloud or sing, and at half-past seven they go to bed. 
The division of the day is thus six hours for work, four for 
school, and four for meals and recreation. In winter they 
get up half an hour later and morning school is omitted. 

This outline of the day is, however, capable of great varia- 
tion, for there can be little routine in the lives of girls who 
take part in all the varied occupations of a farm. For 
instance : one afternoon last May, when one of the Trustees 
visited the institution, the school-rooms were found almost 
deserted ; in searching for the girls, one was discovered 
mounted on a scaffold in the kitchen, painting the walls and 
ceiling ; several others were in the Superintendent's house, 
repairing an old carpet and helping paper a room. Out of 
doors were two girls making a plank walk ; four others were 
found mounted on tall ladders, painting the outside of the 
farmhouse, and a dozen more were at work in the fields. It 
was a lovely day, the mild air fragrant with bursting buds, 
and all nature rejoicing in its renewed life and beauty. The 
girls' happy faces were flushed with exercise and eager with 
the interest of their novel occupations ; and one could not 
but hope that the renewing powers of nature were at work 
in their young lives as well as in the fields and woods, and 



16 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

that seed was beino- sown that would bring forth fruit an 
hundred-fold. For this free, healthy life, with its varied 
occupations, seems eminently fitted to wean these girls from 
their past evil lives. It is calculated to awaken dormant 
faculties and to stimulate healthy ambitions, which may 
guide them when they are restored to freedom. It is an 
education, moreover, that fits them admirably to earn their 
own living as they leave the school ; and the many applica- 
tions for our Lancaster girls which are filed at the State 
House show a real demand for their labor in many a country 
household. 

The girls have all been committed to the Industrial School 
for their minority ; but the sentence is practically an indeter- 
minate rather than a long one ; for, after a year more or less 
in the institution, they are usually placed out on probation.* 
This probation period the Trustees believe to be the most 
important feature of their work. It is easy to control even 
the rnost depraved girls while the}^ are inside an institution ; 
the whole question is, how to guide them when again 
exposed to the temptations of life. In this endeavor the 
Trustees find the co-operation of the auxiliary visitors of the 
utmost value. These visitors are a band of volunteers, 
organized under the State Board of Lunacy and Charity ; 
they are residents in various parts of the State, and each 
girl who leaves the school is placed under the care of the 
visitor of that neighborhood. This supervision makes the 
probation a real one, uniting the protection of careful over- 
sight and partial restraint with the education of freedom and 
self-support. Through the watchfulness of the visitors, 
girls on the downward course can often be returned to the 
school before it is too late ; their kindly interest encourages 
many a one to be contented in what is too often a life of very 
lonely drudgery ; and only those who could see the girls 
letters to their visitors, or hear their appeals for sympathy 
and advice, can realize the value of this volunteer work. 

The following table will show, as nearly as figures can, 
what is the present condition of the two hundred and eighty- 
one girls in the care of the school : — 

*The Treasurer has this year received $668.57 from the girls on probation to be 
deposited to their credit. 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



17 



During this year there have been within the school for more or 
less time, . . . . ■ • . ' • 



In the school Sept. 30, 1887, 

Returned to the school, having been placed out in former 
years, . . . . . ... 

New commitments, ....... 

Total, 



The following disposition was made of these girls : — 



In the school Sept. 30, 1888, 
In place, .... 
With friends (behaving well). 
Married, .... 
Almshouse or at board, . 
Reformatory Prison, 
Ran away, .... 
Discharged, 

Died, 

Come of age, . 
Total,. 



157 



58 

53 
46 
— 157 



: 63 

51 

9 



During the year there have been sent out from the school, 
There have been returned (including the 53 from former years 1 



157 
fl04 



placing), ......... 




66 


for illness, 


10 




change of place, 


23 




visit (during absence of employer), .... 


3 




unsatisfactory conduct, . . 


12 




theft or other bad conduct, ...... 


18 




Total, 


— 


m 


Total in custody Sept. 30, 1887, 


235 




Committed this year, 


4G 




Total in custody during the year (including the 157 






already accounted for), 


— 


281 


Of whom there have attained their majority, .... 


25 




Discharged by vote for good conduct, . . 


4 




" " nearly twenty-one years of age, 


13 




" " as unfit subjects for the school, 


1 




" " as defective in intellect, .... 


8 




Died, 


2 




Total who have come of age, been discharged, or died, . 


— 


56 


* Among this sixty-three are two who were so young and so unwisely ma 


•ried 


that it was thought best to take them back to the school for the present. 






t Of the 104 sent out, there were placed once, 


. 82 




" " twice, ..... 


. 16 




" " three times, .... 


. 5 




" " four times 


. 1 





- 104 



18 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

At work in families, *79 

At work elsewhere, 1 

On probation with friends, . . . . ... .20 

Mat ried in former years, not yet twenty-one, . . . .1(5 

Married this year, .16 

Total self-sivpporting, . . . . . . . — L32 

In the school Sept. 30, 1888, 03 

In Almshouse or at board, 3 

Transferred to Reformatory Prison in former years, . . 6 

Transferred to Reformatory Prison this year, . . . 8 

Total still supported at cost of the State, ... — 80 

Ran away former years, not yet recovered, .... 7 
Ran away this year, .0 



Total still in care of the Trustees, 225 

One girl who had been transferred to Sherborn two years 
ago, and for good conduct in the prison had been returned to 
the care of the school, for bad conduct on probation was 
again transferred to prison. Several others who were last 
year on the list of runaways have been found, under assumed 
names, behaving disgracefully and tempting others into dis- 
reputable houses; for the good of the school, the Trustees 
asked the Commissioners of Prisons to transfer them to 
Sherborn. Three girls who were last year among those 
doing badly have now for many months been honestly self- 
supporting. A young woman who, as these are doing, 
cares for and supports an illegitimate child by housework in 
a country family, surely has a claim on the forgiveness and 
tender consideration of the community. 

But no figures, of course, can show what is the real propor- 
tion of our failures to our successes. The probation is a 
long one ; and some who for years may be favorably reported, 
may another year be among the fallen. Our experience leads 
us to feel that most of our girls must be subjects for anxiety 
as long as they are in the flesh ; for the temptations of life 
are perennial, and no training and no circumstances can 

* Of this number, two with, friends and three at work in other families are not only 
supporting themselves but an illegitimate child, as mentioned below. 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 19 

ensure that those who are not strong in native virtue shall 
not fall. On the other hand, some of those of whom least 
was expected seem to turn out well. Of the fifteen girls 
married this year, twelve were well married. 

With one class of girls with whom they are called upon to 
deal, the Trustees find their methods ill adapted. Those 
who are mentally defective are of course incapable of being 
successfully graduated, and what to do with them is always a 
standing difficulty. It has seemed almost equally bad to 
keep them indefinitely in the school, to place them out when 
they are believed to be incapable of continued good conduct, 
or to discharge them to parents who were known to be unfit 
for their care. In their last report the Trustees called atten- 
tion to the need for a custodial asylum similar to that already 
established for the care of this class in the State of New York. 
The Trustees of the Institution for the Feeble-Minded have 
also long testified to the necessity for such an institution, 
and the State Board of Lunacy and Charity in their last 
report made urgent recommendations to the same effect. 
Their investigations discovered nearly two hundred such 
women, some in the second or third generation, and many 
of whom had borne one or more illegitimate children, drift- 
ing in and out of our almshouses ; and the Trustees can add 
to this list at least twenty who are or have been under their 
care. As to the practical question of what to do Avith such 
girls, pending a proper provision for them, the State Board 
recommends that they be discharged. They say: "The 
training of the Industrial School is too expensive to be wasted 
upon girls who are incapable of protecting themselves from 
wrong when freed from restraint ; who cannot justly be held 
responsible for their misdeeds, and who should not be pun- 
ished like criminals. Neither should the school be made an 
asylum for these defective ones ; and, until such an institution 
as that recommended can be established, this Board would 
advise the Trustees to avail themselves of the power given 
in Public Statutes, chapter 89, section 45, and discharge to 
parents or guardians such girls as are unfit subjects for the 
school, and equally unfit for placing in families, or who ought 
for any cause to be removed from the school." Accordingly, 



20 PRIMAKY AM) REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

this year eighl feeble-minded girls have been discharged; 
but this is manifestly no solution of the difficulty. These 
unfortunates are committed to the Industrial School because 
unfit to be at large, and because unreformed and unreform- 
able, they are turned loose upon the world, to the ruin of 
their own lives and the degradation of society. It is earn- 
estly hoped that the Legislature will not longer postpone the 
needed provision for a class so harmful to the community. 

The Trustees wish, in closing, to express their sense of 
obligation to the Superintendent of the Industrial School. 
When they decided, three years ago, to give the position to a 
woman, the experiment was felt to be a critical one; but 
their choice fortunately fell upon the present incumbent, 
Mrs. Brackett, who has proved rarely qualified for the work. 
Not the least evidence of her capacity has been her selection 
of her present staff of officers ; her own simple and kindly 
spirit seems to pervade the institution, and the beautiful 
relations which often exist between the girls and the officers 
must be an untold influence lor good. Every girl in the 
school, and most of those outside, are considered by the 
Superintendent with an individual interest ; and the Trustees 
feel that to her wise co-operation they owe the effective 
development of the family and probation systems. 

In their last report the Trustees mentioned the need of an 
additional appropriation to continue the improvements in the 
plumbing, drainage and water supply. The Legislature in 
1888 granted $4,000 to carry on the work in this line. The 
plumbing in the family houses is now in a satisfactory condi- 
tion. There is an unexpended balance of $466.42, which 
will be used for improvements in the drainage of the Super- 
intendent's house, and in completing the work on reservoir 
and water supply for the school. It may be found necessary 
to ask for a further small appropriation. 

The appropriation was $18,600, of which $7,300 was for 
salaries, and $11,300 for current expenses. Somewhat 
over $600 was returned to the treasury from the sale of 
farm produce.* The net expense, divided among the in- 
mates, makes the high per capita cost of $4.90. But the 

* The increase this year in the valuation of the personal property is $1,218.63. 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 21 

foregoing detailed account of the methods of the school — 
methods which really enable it to care for 281 girls, and not 
only for those upon the grounds — will show that this high 
rate is apparent rather than real. 

Very respectfully submitted by the Trustees, 

M. H. WALKER, Westborougii, President. 
CHARLES L. GARDNER, Palmer, Treasurer. 
ELIZABETH C. PUTNAM, Boston, Secretary. 
MILO HILDRETH, Northborough. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS, Boston. 
JAMES J. O'CONNOR, Holyoke. 
HENRY C. GREELEY, Clinton. 

Sept. 30, 188S. 



22 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



TRUST FUNDS OF LYMAN SCHOOL. 



TREASURER'S ACCOUNT. 



Lyman Fund. 



Samuel R. Heywood, Treasurer, in account with Income of Lyman 

Fund. 

1887. I>R. 

Balance brought forward, . 
Dividend Citizens 1 National Bank, 
Interest note town of Northborough, 
Dividend Fitchburg R. R., . 
Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., 

Interest Boston & Albany R. R. bonds. 

Interest Old Colony R. R. bond, . 

Interest Worcester Street R. R. bonds, 

Interest note town of Marlborough, . 

Dividend Citizens 1 National Bank, 

Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., 

State tax from Tax Commissioners on account 

bank stock, ..... 
Interest note town of Northborough, . 
Dividend Fitchburg R. R., . 
Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., 
Interest Boston & Albany R. R. bonds, 
Interest Worcester Street R. R. bonds, 
Interest Old Colony R. R. bond, . 
Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., 
Interest on deposit Central National Bank, 



Sept. 
Oct. 


30. 
1. 


Nov. 


1. 




15. 


Dec. 


31. 


1888. 

Feb. 1. 




18. 




18. 


March 31. 




31. 




31. 


April 


21. 


May 


1. 

15. 


June 


30. 


Aug. 
Sept. 


1. 
9. 
9. 




29. 



$3,892 67 


100 00 


30 00 


184 00 


228 00 


70 00 


30 00 


100 00 


206 25 


100 00 


228 00 


81 97 


30 00 


184 00 


228 00 


70 00 


100 00 


30 00 


228 00 


30 00 



$6,150 89 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 23 

Paid by Order of Trustees. 

1887. Cr. 
Nov. 14. Paid for Worcester Street R. R. bonds, . . $4,057 22 
24. H. E. Swan, Superintendent, Thanksgiving en- 
tertainment, 25 00 

Dec. 17. H.E. Swan, Superintendent, Christmas entertain- 
ment, 30 00 

1888. 

Jan. 19. Postage stamps and stationery, .... 3 12 

April 3. H. E. Swan, Superintendent, for outfit for 

Thomas McDonald, 23 12 

19. A. Mudge & Son, for "Lessons from the 

Gospels," 120 00 

May 11. A. L. Burt, books, . . . . . . 9 80 

June 28. H. E. Swan, Superintendent, for Fourth of July 

festival, . . . t 25 00 

28. R. P. Fernald, board of George F. Stacy, . . 32 50 

July 13. Thomas Whittaker, royalty on GOO lesson books, 12 00 

13. Postage stamps, 2 00 

Sept. 29. Balance forward, 1,811 13 

• 

$6,150 89 

SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, Treasurer. 

Sept. 29, 1888. 
Examined and approved : M. II. Walker. 

Charles L. Gardner. 



Mary Lamb Fund, Lyman School. 

Samuel R. Heywood, Treasurer, in account with Income of Mary 

Lamb Fund. 

1887. Dr. 

Sept. 30. Balance brought forward, $31 93 

Dec. 31. Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., , . . . 10 00 

1888. 

March 31. Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., . . . . 10 00 
June 30. Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., . . . . 10 00 
Sept. 29. Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., . . . . 10 00 



$71 93 

1888. ClJ. 

Sept. 29. Balance forward, $71 93 

SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, Treasurer. 
Sept. 29, 1888. 
Examined and approved : M. II. Walker. 

Charles L. Gardner. 



24 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Inventory of Lyman School Investments, Lyman Fund. 



Ill shares Boston & Albany R. II. stock, 

92 shares Fitchburg R. R. stock, 

40 shares Citizens 1 National Bank, . 

Two $1,000 7 per cent. Boston & Albany 

R. R. bonds, 

One $1,000 C per cent. Old Colony R. R. bond 

Note town Northborongh, 

Note town Marlborough, .... 

Cash in Central National Bank, 

4 Worcester Street Railway bonds, 5 per cent 



111,400 00 
9,200 00 
4,000 00 

2,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,500 00 
10,000 00 
1,960 46 
4,000 00 



Market value. 

$22,800 00 
7,866 00 

4,800 00 

2,150 00 
1,100 00 
1,500 00 
10,000 00 
1,900 46 
4,000 00 



Mary Lamb Fund. 



5 shares stock Boston & Albany R. R., 
Deposit in People's Savings Bank, . 



Tar value. Market value. 

$500 00 $1,000 00 
455 35 455 35 



SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, 

Treasurer. 
Sept. 29, 1888. 
Examined and approved: M. II. Walkeh. 

Charles L. Gardner. 



.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 25 



TKUST FUND STATE INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL. 



Samuel R. Heywood, Treasurer, in account with Mary Lamb Fund. 

1887. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Dividend Boston National Bank, .... $39 00 

1888. 

March 31. Dividend Boston National Bank, . 

April 21. State tax refunded on bank stock for 1885, 

21. State tax refunded on bank stock for 1886, 

21. State tax refunded on bank stock for 1887, 



39 


00 


19 


10 


18 


96 


20 


34 



$136 40 



Paid by Order of Trustees. 

3 887. Cr. 

Nov. 16. Dr. J. E. Pratt, medical attendance A. M. S., 
Dec. 12. Mrs. E. G. Evans, for A. G., 

1888. 

June 28. Mrs. L. L. Brackett, Superintendent, Fourth of 

July festival, 

Sept. 29. Balance forward, 



$19 


75 


19 


25 


20 


00 


77 


40 



$136 40 



SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, 

Treasurer. 
Sept. 29, 1888. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 

Charles L. Gardner. 



26 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL TEUST FUND. 



Samuel R. Heywood, Treasurer, in account with Industrial School 

Trust Fund. 

1888. Dr. 

Jan. 7. Drawn from People's Savings Bank, M. A. S., ■ ?U 24 

May 7. Drawn from People's Savings Bank, M. A. S., . 10 00 

July 21. Drawn from People's Savings Bank, M. A. S., . 15 00 











$39 24 






Paid 


by Order of Trustees. 




1888. 






Cr. 




Jan. 7. 


M. A. S., 






$14 24 


May 7. 


M. A. S., 






10 00 


July 21. 


M. A. S., 






15 00 



$39 24 

SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, 

• Treasurer. 



Sept. 28, 1888. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walker. 

Charles L. Gardner. 



Fay Fund. 

1888. Dr. 

Sept. 20. Interest from Chelsea Savings Bank, ... $40 40 

Paid by Order of Trustees. 

1888. Cr- 

Sept. 20. For highest grade deportment, to eight girls, 

|5.05 each, $40 40 

SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, 

Treasurer. 
Sept. 29, 1888. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walker. 

Charles L. Gardner. 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 27 

Inventory of Industrial School Investments, Mary Lamb Fund. 

1888. Par value. Market value. 

Sept. 30. 13 shares Boston National Bank, . $1,300 00 $1,610 00 

Fay Fund. 

1888. 

Sept. 30. Deposit in Chelsea Savings Bank, . . . $1,000 00 

Rogers Fund. 

1888. 

Sept. 30. One State Maine 6 per cent, bond, in custody of 

State Treasurer, f 1,000 00 

SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, 

Treasurer. 
Sept. 29, 1888. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 

Chakles L. Gardner. 

1888. 

Sept. 30. Cash received from Superintendent and others 

for deposit to credit of sundry girls from Oct. 

6, 1887, to Sept. 26, 1888, $668 57 

By deposit in savings bank on account of sundry 

girls, 668 57 

Cash drawn from savings banks on account of 

sundry girls from Oct. 3, 1887, to Sept. 5, 1888, 543 31 

By paid sundry amounts drawn from savings 

banks, . 543 31 



Memorandum of Savings Deposits for Girls. 

1888. 

Sept. 30. Ill depositors in Westborough Savings Bank. 
3 depositors in Clinton Savings Bank. 
2 depositors in People's Savings Bank. 
27 depositors in Boston Five Cents Savings 
Bank. 

SAMUEL R. HEYWOOD, 

Treasurer. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL 



MONSON. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

The year ending Sept. 30, 1888, has been a year of great 
activity in the State Primary School. The children are to 
be commended for their general ^ood behavior and desire 
for advancement, the teachers for their untiring zeal in behalf 
of the children, and officers for their faithfulness in the dis- 
charge of duty. If less progress has been made than has 
been sought, the belief is present that aims and ambitions 
have been worthy ones. 

At the time of the last annual report there were 316 per- 
sons in the institution as inmates or pupils. The number of 
admissions during the year has been 222. The number 
placed out on trial or on board is less than during the pre- 
vious year, — 185. The number of discharges has been 33, 
while 5 have been removed to other institutions and 1 has 
died. The greatest number in the institution at any given 
time during the year, was on the 1st of January, when 
there were 347. The least number was during the last week 
in June, when there were 300. Average number for the 
year, 321. These have been maintained at an expense of 
$51,383.41. During the year the dietary has been changed 
considerably. More vegetables have been used, and a 
greater variety of food has been served. Care has been 
taken that the sanitary conditions of the premises should be 
kept in good order, and general good health has prevailed. 
Indeed, a year in which there was but a single death has not 
been known in the history of the school, until the year now 
closing. Changes are now being made in the hospital, 
which will, I trust, greatly improve its hygienic conditions, 
as well as make it more convenient for doins: the work 
required. 



32 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

There are now forty-two children out on board, — nine 
more than at the date of the last annual report. Very little 
sickness has been reported among these children, and, so 
far as I know, they are in good homes and are receiving 
proper care. The amount expended in this department dur- 
ing the year is $3,825.59. 

The educational condition of the children is about the 
same as in previous years. Some of the better educated 
ones have passed on and out of the school ; others have 
taken their places, from the ranks below and from the out- 
side, world, and are now striving, by good conduct and fairly 
faithful effort, to reach the goal, — a chance for a home in 
the country in some good family. The help given, and the 
work done here, are intended to be such as will aid them in 
this direction. By referring to the tabular statement form- 
ing a part of this report, denoted as " K," it will be seen in 
what way many of the children have been employed. The 
work done on the farm by the boys during the past year has 
exceeded that of any previous year since my connection with 
the school. Many of the boys that have worked there are 
less than twelve years old ; but the younger ones, as well as 
the older ones, have worked with a will, and the results 
have been manifest on every hand. 

I am happy to say that the work in the school-room has 
been done by faithful teachers, and, in the main, earnest 
pupils. The course of study adopted more than a year ago 
has been found to be an improvement on the course followed 
previously. Words from books may be committed to mem- 
ory, so that a book lesson may be easily learned. The aim 
has been to teach so as to lead to thought and the applica- 
tion of knowledge, — to forget lessons learned in unsuitable 
homes and in the streets, and to learn lessons of good 
morals and purity. High rank in scholarship has not been 
put forward as the sine qua non as much as moral excel- 
lence. All may not have learned these lessons, but the 
year closes with the satisfaction of having made an earnest 
effort that such lessons should be learned. Industrial train- 
ing has not been overlooked in the education of these chil- 
dren. The work in all the departments has been prosecuted 
with as much zeal as at any previous time. In addition, the 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 33 

girls have been taught to knit and to crochet, and have found 
recreation in so doing. A few carpenter's tools were bought 
in the early spring and placed in care of one of the yard offi- 
cers, for the use of the boys. A portion of the boys have 
learned some of the uses of these tools. I am satisfied that 
a more extended course in manual training is desirable. I 
do not mean by this that boys should be taught trades, — 
they remain in the school too short a time for that. Every 
boy in the school gets some knowledge of arithmetic, some 
of geography, some of reading, and some of the uses of 
words and construction of sentences. Very few of them 
will pursue these studies to any great extent after leaving 
the school. Such knowledge as is acquired better fits them 
for duties to which they may be called. If the boy can be 
taught to think, and led to give expression to his thoughts 
by forming something with his hands, his education becomes 
a broader one because of it. He may not pursue such a line 
of work when sent away from the school, but he is better 
fitted for the work to which he may be called because of the 
knowledge he has gained in forming something. 

The school is still conducted on the congregate system. 
This may be more economical than the family system, but 
not so homelike. In this system children may be taught 
many things, but not to be self-reliant as much as in the 
family system. The buildings are suited to the work as it 
is done. Their present condition is such that they cannot 
well be converted into cottages for family -uses. They have 
served the school well during its existence, and are yet too 
valuable to be abandoned. While it does not seem best to 
suggest the giving up of the buildings entirely, it may be 
best to begin the work of putting the school on the family 
system. I consider the congregate system less objectionable 
for the boys sent here, than for the girls. Girls need a great 
deal of outdoor life, but they need some indoor life, so as to 
be able to do the work pertaining to a household. A house 
in which a girl could have a room of her own and a wardrobe 
of her own, and be held responsible for their good condition, 
would be a great help in the education of the girl. Such a 
house, built during the year to come, would be the beginning 
of more advanced methods in the care of the children. For 



34 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

this purpose a special appropriation will be needed. I hope 
it may be large enough that a house may be built, in which 
all the conditions needful for health, comfort and enjoyment 
can be found. 

Three of the steam boilers now in use were placed in their 
present position during the year 1870, and have been in use 
since that time. The repairs on them have not been great, 
but sufficient to keep them in good order. Two of these 
were inspected on the first day of August last. The inspec- 
tor reports that the tubes, on the outside, are very much 
corrodecl. They are not at present considered dangerous, 
but, in view of their age and condition, I think it would be 
well to put new ones in their place before the autumn of 
1889. To do this, a special appropriation will be needed, 
unless the regular one is increased. 

Such repairs have been made on the buildings, from time 
to time, as seemed necessary ; some new floors have been 
laid ; a new mangle has been put into the laundry, and some 
painting has been done where it was most needed. The 
painting of the barns, begun last year, has been finished. 
The work of repairing the stone wall fences has been con- 
tinued, and several rods of new wall have been laid. More 
of this work ought to be done, and I see no reason why it 
cannot be continued. 

The product of the farm for the year has been great, — a 
well-filled barn bearing evidence of this. Corn fodder, 
grown on a little more than six acres of land, was sufficient 
to fill the silo. The apple crop is by no means small. The 
supply of vegetables for the winter is abundant. The stock 
on the farm is in good condition, and, although a large 
stock, there is an abundance of fodder for it. The farm 
is of great value to the school. Without it, many of the 
comforts now enjoyed would be unknown. If there were 
no profit to be derived from it, we could not afford to be 
without it. I am happy to be able to submit so favorable 
an account as is contained in statement " Q," which is a 
part of this report. 

The Hospital Newspaper Society of Boston has again 
donated various books, magazines and papers for the use of 
the children ; other friends of the school, many of them 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 35 

unknown to me, have from time to time sent sundry articles ; 
and for all these I extend thanks, — also to you for the 
interest manifested in the school, as well as for help and 
counsel ; and to the Giver of every good and perfect gift for 
mercies and blessings so abundantly bestowed upon us. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

AMOS ANDREWS, 

Superintendent. 
Oct. 1, 1888. 






36 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Statement A. — Summary of Admissions avd Discharges. 



Boys. 


Girls. 


Women. 


Totals. 


Present Oct. 1, 1887, 


228 


72 


16 


316 


Received from State Almshouse at Tewks- 
bury, 


26 


17 


5 


48 


Received from Superintendent Indoor 
Poor, as juvenile offenders, 


47 


1 


_ 


48 


Received from Superintendent Indoor 
Poor, as neglected children, . 


14 


7 


_ 


21 


Received from Superintendent Indoor 
Poor, as dependent, 


9 


1 


_ 


10 


Received from Lyman School, . 


3 


- 


- 


3 


Received from Bridgewater, 


2 


1 


1 


4 


Returned, placed in previous years, . 


32 


13 


- 


45 


Returned, having been placed out since 
Sept. 30, 1887, 


38 


5 


- 


43 


Totals, 


399 


117 


22 


538 


Discharged by Board of Lunacy and 
Charity, 


15 


13 


5 


33 


Placed out on trial, 


133 


31 


- 


164 


Removed to Bridgewater, .... 


3 


- 


- 


3 


Removed to Children's Hospital for treat- 
ment, 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


Removed to Deaf and Dumb Asylum at 
Hartford, 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


Boarded out in families, .... 


13 


8 


- 


21 


Died, 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Totals, 


165 


54 


5 


224 


Remaining Oct. 1, 1888, .... 


234 


63 


17 


314 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



37 



Statement B. 

Number of Children received from Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 
Juvenile Offenders. 

During year ending Sept. 30, 1884, 28 

" 30, 1885, 33 

" 30, 1886, ,40 

" 30, 1887, 34 

" 30, 1888 48 

Average for 5 years, . . ■ 36-f- 



Number of Children received from Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 

Neglected Children. 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1884, 
" 30, 1885, 



" 30, 1886, 
" 30, 1887, 
" 30, 1888, 
Average for 5 years, 



15 
27 
32 
23 
21 
23+ 



Number of Children received from Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 
Dependent Children. 

Year ending kept. 30, 1884, 31 

" 30, 1885, 29 

" 30, 1886, 11 

" 30, 1887, 9 

" 30, 1888, 10 

Average for 5 years, 18 



Number received from State Almshouse. 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1884, 

" 30, 1885, 

" 30, 1886, 

" 30, 1887, 

" 30, 1888, 
Average for 5 years, 



69 
99 
27 
76 
48 
63+ 



Number of Children returned from Place, halving been placed out in 

Previous Years. 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1884, .29 



" 30, 1885, 
" 30, 1886, 
" 30, 1887, 
" 30, 1888, 
Average for 5 years, 



49 
47 
46 
45 
43+ 



38 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 



Number of Children returned from Place, having been placed out in 

Current Years. 

31 

38 



Year ending Sept. 30, 1884, 
" 30, 1885, 
" 30, 1886, 
" 30, 1887, 
" 30, 1888, 

Average for 5 years, 



34 

16 
43 
38+ 



Statement C. — Nativity of Inmates. 

The nativity of the 134 persons received during the year (not includ- 
ing those returned from places) is as follows : — 

Native born, 91 

Foreign born, 34 

Unknown, 9 



Of the foreign born, there were born in — 



Canada, . 
England. 
Germany, 
Ireland. . 



New Brunswick, 
Nova Scotia, . 
Prussia, . 

Scotland, 



Of those born in the United States, there were born in — 



Connecticut, . 


1 


New York, 






2 


Maine, 


1 


Rhode Island, ... 1 


Massachusetts, 


. 79 


Vermont, .... 2 


New Hampshire, . 


4 


Virginia, 1 


Of those born in Massachusetts, ti 


lere were born in — 


Ashland, 


1 


Merrimac, . . 1 


Barre, 


1 


Milford, 






4 


Boston, . 


. 12 


Natick, . 






1 


Buckland, 


1 


North Adams, 






2 


Chelsea, . 


2 


Northampton, 






1 


Concord, 


1 


Salem, . 






4 


Deerfield, 


1 


Springfield, . 






6 


East Cambridge, . 


2 


South Boston, 






1 


Everett, . 


1 


Stoneham, 






1 


Fall River, 


. 10 


Tewksbury, . 






1 


Gloucester, 


2 


Watertown, . 






2 


Hoi yoke, 


1 


West Bridgewater, 






1 


Lawrence, 


2 


West Brookfield, 






1 


Lowell, . 


4 


Westport, 






1 


Lynn, 


4 


Weymouth, . 






1 


Marblehead, . 


1 


Worcester, 






5 



DIAGRAM — Showing movement' of f^ohulation at State Primary School. 



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shows movement" for yeevr ending 5e|^t. 5o. 1556- 








„ « 1557 

i 855. 





1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



39 





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1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



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42 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 



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Engineer, . • . 
Physician, . 

Clerk, ..'.'.' 
Baker, .... 
In charge of dining-hall, 
Supervisor, . 


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Expressman, 
Matron, 
Assistant Matron, 

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Principal and teacher of fii 
Teacher of second class, 
'■ of second class, 
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" of third class, 
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Miss Emma A. Moore, 
Miss E. M. Fullington, 
Miss N. J. Bice, . 
Miss E. S. Foster, . 
Miss Harriet Lacey, 
Miss G. A. Cheney, . 
Miss Harriet Lacey, 


Amos Andrews, . 
John N. Lacey, . 
Sarah M. Wilbur, M.D. 

C. L. IlAYNES, M.D, 

James J. Prentiss, 
Frank Duffy, . 
Elon G. Buss, . 
Charles H. Bradley, 
A. W. Mansur, . 
John E. Taylor, 
John M. Sears, . 
J. M. Sisk, . 
Mrs. M. A. Andrews, 
Miss A. Swinerton, 
Mrs. M. C. Bradley, 
Miss Etta J. Lent, 
Miss N. J. Bice,. 
Miss M. A. Clark, 


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1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 43 



IXNOOOOOOOWOCONOtNO^CCKMHO^cOHWrlOOCO^NOO 
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" of fourth class, 

" of fifth class (music) , 

" of fifth class, 

" of fifth class, (music), 

" of fifth class, (music), 

" of sixth class, 

" of seventh class, . 

" of seventh class, . 

" of eighth class (kinder 

Nurse, 

Instructor in sewing, . 

Assistant Instructor in sewing, 
Tailoress, .... 
Assistant Tailoress, . 
Sirpervisor, .... 


Substitute, .... 


Assistant in dining-hall, 
Cook, 

Hospital Cook, . 

Laundress, .... 
Assistant Laundress, . 










„ 


Miss -Kate L. Blenus, 

Miss G. A. Mosher, 
Miss E. 8. Foster, 
Miss Julia L. Wilson, . 
Mrs. S. E. Prentiss, . 
Mrs. H. E. Darte, 
Mrs. 8. E. Prentiss, 
Miss F. J. Dyer, 
Mrs. L. J. Blaisdell, 
Miss Florence A. Ramsai 
Miss Tenah Porter, 
Mrs. A. A. Taylor, . 
Mrs. A. B. Payne, 
Mrs. J. A. Buss, . 
Miss Lilian E. Buss, 
Miss Lucy F. Kingham, 
Miss Lizzie A. Kingham, 
Miss Clara A. Lent, 
Miss Carrie M. Blenus, 
Mrs. J. M. Mansur, 
Miss Abbie C. Phelps, 
Miss L. E. Preston, . 
Miss Ellen Eanley, 
Miss Nettie L. Hollow A' 
Mrs. 8. J. Pease, . 
Miss Clara A. Lent, 
Miss Annie Velie, . 
Miss Kale L. Blenus, . 
Miss Louisa Tapley, 
Miss Belle McKinnon, . 
Miss M. M. Lee, 
Mrs. E. J. Barnes, . 


OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOkTOOOOOOO 

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44 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



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William M. Payne, 
William M. Watson, 
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Edward E. Walker, 
Fred. S. Barnes, 
Joseph Merriam, . 
Alvah H. Jenkins, . 
Farnum H. Aldrich, 
Gordon Graven, . 
Stanley C. Blenus, . 
Harrison B. Ware, . 
William M. Watson, 
Edw. B. Belknap, . 
James Skevington, . 
Farnum H. Aldrich, 
William Franklin, . 
Thomas J. Flynn, 
William Kelley, 


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1888. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



45 



Statement G. 
Products of the Farm. 



1888. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Apples, early, 


136i bushels, . 


$68 25 


" cider, 










500 


75 00 


" winter, . 










200 barrels, . 


400 00 


Asparagus, . 










12 bushels, . 


24 00 


Beans, . 










25 


29 00 


Beef, . 










12,976 pounds, . 


927 73 


Beets, . 










161 bushels, . 


78 50 


Cabbage, 










2,800 heads, . 


223 90 


Carrots, 










1,000 bushels, . 


500 00 


Celery, 










950 « bunches, . 


95 00 


Corn fodder, 












50 00 


Crab apples, 










f bushel, . 


1 00 


Cucumbers, . 










32f bushels, . 


48 37 


Currants, 










116 quarts, . 


11 60 


Eggs, . 










508 T 2 2 dozen, . 


111 74 


Ensilage, 










125 tons, 


625 00 


Hay, . 










158 


2,760 00 


Ice, 










375 


562 50 


Indian corn, 










300 bushels, . 


225 00 


Lettuce, 










77 


38 50 


Mangolds, . 










2,000 


600 00 


Manure, 










500 loads, 


500 00 


Milk, . 










124,813 quarts, . 


4,992 52 


Oats, . 










150 bushels, . 


75 00 


Oat straw, . 










3 tons, 


36 00 


Onions, 










218 bushels, . 


130 80 


Pears, . 










2| 


2 75 


Pease, . 










39 


65 00 


Peppers, 










\ bushel, . 


50 


Potatoes, 










1,154 bushels, . 


695 60 


Parsnips, 










80 


36 00 


Poultry, 










514 pounds, . 


102 80 


Pork, . 










9,848 


712 45 


Quinces, 










15 bushels, . 


30 00 


Radishes, 










100 bunches, . 


5 00 


Ruta-bagas, . 










200 bushels, . 


60 00 


Rhubarb, 










40 


' 24 00 


Rowen, 










30 tons, 


450 00 


Rye, . . 










40 bushels, . 


30 00 


Rye straw, . 










11 tons, 


21 00 


Raspberries, 










18 quarts, . 


2 16 


Strawberries, 










634 


76 08 


Spinach, 










31 bushels, . 


7 75 


Squash, summer, 










26 


26 00 


" winter, 










2,500 pounds, . 


100 00 


Sweet corn, . 










128 bushels, . 


64 00 


Tomatoes, . 










89f 


54 75 


Turnips, 










2,000 


200 00 


Veal, . 










405 pounds, . 


40 50 


Watermelons, 










1,300 


13 00 


Wood, . 








20 cords, 


110 00 


Total, . 










$16,118 75 



46 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Statement H. 
Work done in Sewing-room No. 1, 



ARTICLES. 


Made. 


Repaired. 


Total. 


Aprons, 


399 


116 


515 


Badges, 










200 


- 


200 


Blouses, 










- 


4 


4 


Belts, . 










13 


- 


13 


Braces, 










5 


- 


5 


Bed ticks, . 










53 


344 


397 


Bed spreads, 










4 


15 


19 


Blankets, . 










- 


7 


7 


Clothes-bags, 










2 


1 


3 


Curtains, 










33 


- 


33 


Chemises, . 










48 


_ 


48 


Coats, 










10 


44 


54 


Dresses, 










221 


65 


286 


Drawers, 










347 


_ 


347 


Eye-shades, 










17 


- 


17 


Holders, 










20 


- 


20 


Mittens, 










_ 


97 


97 


Names sewed on 


3 








125 


- 


125 


Night-dresses, 










225 


1 


226 


Mght-shirts, 










48 


_ 


48 


Pants, . 










_ 


43 


43 


Pillow-cases, 










196 


39 


235 


Rugs, . 










_ 


24 


24 


Scrub pads, 










31 


- 


31 


Sheets, 










256 


88 


349 


Sacques, 










64 


75 


134 


Shirts, 










- 


1,982 


1,982 


Sleeves, 










24 


- 


24 


Stockings, . 










- 


3,278 


3,278 


Skirts, 










128 


- 


128 


Table napkins, 










96 


_ 


96 


Table cloths, 










3 


32 


35 


Towels, 










637 


860 


1,497 


Tea-bags, . 










34 


- 


34 


Waists, 










200 


10 


210 


Wash cloths, 










186 


- 


186 












3,625 


7,125 


10,750 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



47 



Statement I. 

Work clone in Sewing-room No. 2. 



ARTICLES. 


Made. 


Repaired. 


Total. 


Blouses, 




55 


55 


Caps, . 






302 


- 


302 


Jackets, 






251 


1,824' 


2,075 


Kitchen aprons, . 






17 


- 


17 


Mittens, 






32 


- 


32 


Pants, . 






725 


3,367 


4.092 


Shirts, 






457 


- 


457 


Suspenders, 




• • 


122 


- 


122 


Totals, . 






1,906 


5,246 


7,152 



Total number of articles made, 



5,531 
12,371 

17,902 



Statement J. 

Amos Andrews, Superintendent and Disbursing Officer of the State 

Primary School, in Account with the State Treasurer. 

Dr. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1887, 

received from appropriation for current expenses for 

1887, 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1887, 

received from appropriation for current expenses for 

1888, 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1888, 

received from appropriation for machinery and repairs 
in laundry, ........ 

received from sales 



Cr. 
Disbursements for three months, ending Dec. 31, 1887, 
Disbursements for nine months, ending Sept. 30, 1888, 

Payments to State Treasurer, 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1888, 



$55,524 58 

[Note. — This institution has no " fund" from which to draw for any 
expenditure whatever. It derives its support wholly from the State 
Treasury by annual legislative appropriations. 



$100 00 


13,083 


24 


967 


34 


38,300 


17 


2,858 


25 


84 


58 


131 


00 


$55,524 58 


$14,150 58 


41,143 


00 


131 


00 


100 00 



48 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

The per capita cost for the year is $3.07. This sum shows the cost of 
clothing, food and lodging, medical attendance, teaching and supervi- 
sion, — in brief, the entire expense of maintaining all the inmates of the 
institution, — together with all ordinary repairs, such as must constantly 
be made to keep the buildings and appliances in good condition ; in- 
cluding also the cost of heating and lighting the buildings, and of fur- 
nishing an outfit for all pupils going away from the school, and their 
travelling expenses. 

Children placed out on trial are provided with two complete suits of 
clothing, with an overcoat extra in cold weather, the whole outfit costing 
on an average $16.00. 

The State appropriations are made for calendar years, while the 
reports of institutions are made for years ending Sept. 30. 

It will therefore readily be seen, that, while the expenditures are 
kept within the yearly appropriations, the expense for the institution 
year may be larger or smaller than the appropriation, including, as it 
does, parts of two calendar years.] 



Statement K. — Employment of Children. 

There are employed in the — 

Dormitories and other parts of the house, 
Sewing-room No. 1, 
Sewing-room No. 2, 
Dining-hall, 
Kitchen, 
Shoe-shop, . 
Bakery, 
Laundry, 
Hospital, 

On the farm and at the barns 
Dormitories and miscellaneous work about the house and 
grounds, 41 

Girls, 37 ; boys, 146 ; total, 183. 



20 


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17 


" 


12 


boys 


19 


n 


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" 


7 


" 


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50 


a 



Statement L. — Children boarded in Families. 

Children boarded in families Sept. 30, 1888, paid for from 

appropriation of State Primary School, .... 42 

Number of days' board paid for, . . . . . . 14,334 

Amount paid during the 3~ear, $3,825 59 

Weekly per capita cost, $1 86-)- 



This sum does not include expense of investigation of places, nor of 
visiting the children after being located, which is paid b}~ the Depart- 
ment of Indoor Poor, and increases the cost to the State. 



1888]. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



49 



Statement M. — Recapitulation of Inventory. 



Taken by Enos Calkins and James B. Shaw of Palmer, 
Sept. 30, 1888. 

Land, 

Buildings, ..... 

Live stock, 

Products of farm, .... 
Carriages and agricultural implements, 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 
Beds and bedding (inmates), 
Other furniture (inmates), . 

Clothing, 

Superintendent's department, 
Dry goods, ..... 
Groceries and provisions, 
Drugs and medicines, . 

Fuel, 

Library and school supplies, 
Heating, water and gas (with fixtures) 
Miscellaneous, .... 

Total, 



Mass., as of 



. $22,664 81 


99,500 00 


7,294 75 


8,232 


50 


3,421 


95 


9,552 


30 


5,018 


34 


5,312 


98 


5,285 75 


6,381 


11 


2,355 


29 


2,803 


10 


293 


17 


4,082 


77 


1,438 


94 


22,300 00 


1,598 


34 


. $207,536 


10 



Statement N. — Receipts. 

Cash on hand at the beginning of the year, .... $100 00 

received from unexpended appropriation of former 

calendar year, 13,083 24 

received from appropriation for the present calendar 

year, 38,300 17 

received from special appropriations for boarding out 

children, 3,825 59 

received from special appropriation for machinery 

and repairs in laundry, 84 58 

received from sales, . 131 00 



Statement O. — Expenditures. 

Current Expenditures. 
For salaries, wages and labor, 
meat, 
fish, 

fruit and vegetables, 
flour, 

grain, feed and meal, 
tea, coffee and chocolate, 
sugar and molasses, 
milk, butter, eggs and cheese. 



$55,524 58 



$17,213 90 

2,215 99 

434 48 

592 02 

3,288 50 

1,881 97 

553 35 

1.291 53 

2,910 99 



50 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



For other groceries and provisions 
clothing-, boots and shoes 
fuel and lights, 
hospital supplies, . 
furniture, beds and bedding 
transportation, 
ordinary repairs, 
extraordinary repairs, 
other current expenses, . 




$1,166 16 

5,756 75 

5,467 95 

412 79 

1,214 92 

775 18 

2,191 90 

395 78 

3,619 25 



Total, $51,383 41 



Extraordinary Expenditures. 

Payments to State Treasurer, $131 00 

For board of children in families, 3,825 59 

For machinery and repairs in laundry, 84 58 



Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1888, 



§55,424 58 
100 00 

§55,524 58 



Statement P. — Resources and Liabilities. 

Resources. 

Cash on hand, $100 00 

Unexpended appropriations, 12,841 58 











812,941 58 


Liabilities. 




Miscellaneous bills, 


$291 59 




$12,649 99 


Statement Q. — Summary of Farm Accoin 


it. 


Dr. 




To live stock as per inventory, . . 


§7,053 70 


wagons and agriculturalimplements as per inventory, 


2,388 80 


paid carpenter and painter for repairs, . 


118 49 


wages of farm help, 






2,215 18 


board of farm help, 




. 




1,162 54 


labor of children, 








575 00 


live stock, .... 








514 00 


grain, feed, etc., 








1,796 84 


hardware, farm tools, etc., 








186 05 


blacksmithing and repairs, 








234 38 


lumber, 








142 66 


harness and repairs, 








67 25 


seeds, fertilizers, etc., 








157 94 


rent of pasture, 








155 2-5 


sundries, . 








13 84 



$16,781 92 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



51 



Cr. 

By farm product of 1887 as per inventory, 
labor for the school, 
cost of keeping horses used for school, 
sale of live stock, 
beef, 
veal, . 
pork, 

eggs and poultry, 
milk, 
ice, . 
wood, 
hay, . 
fruit and vegetables 



17,256 


00 


448 


35 


313 


68 


134 


00 


927 


73 


40 


50 


712 


45 


214 


54 


4,992 


52 


562 50 


110 


00 


3,210 00 


1,515 


01 


|20,437 


28 



52 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S BEPOKT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

Having but recently entered upon my duties here, I am 
not acquainted with the health of the school during the past 
year, except from the records of the former resident, which 
show the following : — 



Number in hospital Sept. 30, 1887, 
" admitted during the year, . 

of deaths, 

" discharged, 

" remaining in hospital Sept. 30, 1888, 



29 

350 

1 

356 

22 



Statistics of Deaths. 



NAME. 


Date of Death. 


Age. 


Cause of Death. 


Philip Thomas, . 


May 11, 1888, 


9 


Pneumonia. 



All in the hospital at present are chronic cases. None are 
confined in bed. James Daniels returned to us from his 
place August 29, on account of severe epileptic seizures 
which he was then having almost daily. He had only two 
very slight attacks from August 28 to September 29, when, 
all medication having been suspended for a few days, he was 
thrown into two violent convulsions. He seems much 
improved since entering the hospital, and we hope with care 
that he may entirely recover. 

One little girl who has been in the hospital since April is 
affected in a very peculiar manner. She has attacks in which 
she neither loses consciousness nor has convulsions, but in 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 53 

which she whirls around the room, moaning and rubbing her 
eyes, and apparently greatly frightened. For a while she had 
about three of these in a day. We are glad to say, how- 
ever, that she is improving, having had no attack for one 
month. 

Besides these and one case of incipient phthisis, my work 
has been mostly for slight accidents and ailments. One boy 
has had a very mild attack of measles. There are now under 
daily treatment several cases of sore eyes, trachoma, trichea- 
sis, conjunctivitis, interstitial keratitis, blepharitis, etc. 

The hospital building is now undergoing hygienic altera- 
tions and additions, and, with this improved state of things, 
we see no reason why the health of the school should not be 
as good during the coming year as it has been for the last 
month. 

I wish to thank Mr. and Mrs. Andrews for their kindness 
and help to me in my work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CALLIE L. HAYNES, 

Resident Physician. 
Monson, Oct. 1, 1888. 



54 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



PRINCIPAL'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the State Primary School. 

With the presentation of this report closes one of the 
most prosperous and progressive years in the school's his- 
tory. Good and faithful work has been done in all the 
classes, the quality of which I commend to your favorable 
consideration. 

Instruction has been given to 634 different pupils, as will 
be seen by referring to the tables embracing a summary of 
the year's work. It may also be observed, that the year 
closes with the same number of pupils as when it began. 
Of the number in attendance Oct. 1, 1887, 149 have 
remained in the school the entire year. The average daily 
attendance in four of the classes is larger, in two it is the 
same, in three it fails below that of last year. School 
began this year with 60 less pupils than it had at the 
beginning of the year previous. This accounts for the 
average daily attendance of all the classes being smaller 
this year than it was last. Owing to a beneficent Provi- 
dence in bestowing a good degree of health upon the chil- 
dren in charge, only one death has occurred among the 
pupils. 

The corps of teachers remains the same as last year, with 
two exceptions. Miss N. J. Rice, who for eight and one- 
half years faithfully served as teacher of the second class, 
resigned in May, on account of ill health, and was succeeded 
by Miss Harriet E. Lacey, an acceptable teacher in charge 
of the fourth class. Miss Kate L. Blenus was appointed to 
the vacancy thus occasioned. In October, Miss Georgia A. 
Mosher, a conscientious teacher of the class of girls and of 
the music, resigned for further pursuance of study. The 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT -No. 18. 55 

class was assigned to Miss Julia L. Wilson, who was suc- 
ceeded by Mrs. James Prentiss, a graduate of Bridgewater 
Normal School, who was in charge of the seventh class. 
Miss Flora J. Dyer, a former worthy instructor of the 
seventh class, and a graduate of the same school, resumed 
charge. 

The new course of study, from which much was confi- 
dently expected, has not proved a disappointment. By it 
a much better classification has been effected, and the grade 
raised to a higher standard. The teachers have been en- 
abled thereby to do more and a better quality of work within 
a limited time. We have found the same mountains of diffi- 
culty to overcome as heretofore, — a lack of perseverance, 
indifference to duty, lack of power to reason and express 
thought understanding! y and intelligently, untruthfulness, 
pilfering, and in some cases a blunted moral sense. It has 
been the highest aim of the instructors to impress upon the 
minds of the children the principles of right living, to foster 
a sacred regard for the truth, love of humanity and country, 
habits of industry and frugality, purity of character, tem- 
perance, benevolence, and like virtues, the possession of 
which would insure to them the blessings of liberty and per- 
manent happiness. The Sunday evening exercises have 
tended to cultivate a refined taste, by storing the memories 
with the best literature. 

Genuine skill and tact is needed on the part of the teacher 
to train these waifs to become thoughtful and sensible mem- 
bers of society. Many have inherited tendencies which 
cannot be overcome without an intelligent recognition of the 
existing evil, and the combined and mighty struggle of both 
teacher and pupil against it. We trust efforts in these 
directions have not been altogether fruitless. 

It has been our purpose, as teachers, to lead the children 
"to see" with facility, "to do" with precision, and "to 
tell" with clearness, the once unknown mysteries of knowl- 
edge. 

During the winter term, entertainments, consisting of 
recitations, dialogues and the expressive singing of good 
songs, have been given by the children of the various classes, 
under the supervision and training of their respective 



56 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

teachers, thus furnishing healthful entertainment to the par- 
ticipants. We hope they have merited the interest which 
our distinguished visitors, the Governor and Council, Legis- 
lative Committee and Auxiliary Board, have been pleased 
to manifest when present. 

The teachers have given written examinations from time 
to time during the year, and have been gratified to observe 
that the percentage of correct answers has been on the 
increase. 

A new text-book — " Hyde's Lessons in English, Second 
Book" — has been added to the list already in use, and is 
well received by teachers and pupils. Harper's series of 
writing books have been selected in place of Cowper- 
th wait's. 

I am under obligations to you for kindly consideration 
and support, in recognition of which I desire to return sin- 
cere thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUGEXIA M. FULLIXGTON, 

Principal. 
Monsox, Mass., Oct. 1, 1888. 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 57 



Text Books used in the School. 

Appleton's Reading Chart. 

Appleton's First, Second, Third and Fourth Readers. 

Badlam's Number Cards. 

Parker's Arithmetical Ch#rt. 

Ray's New Primary Arithmetic. 

Ray's New Elementary Arithmetic. 

Ray's New Practical Arithmetic. 

Hyde's Practical Lessons in the use of English, First and Second 

Books. 
Swinton's English Grammar and Composition. 
Swinton's Introductory Geography. 
Swinton's Grammar School Geography. 
Higginson's Young Folks' History of the United States. 
Physiology and Hygiene. 
Meleney and Griffin's Selected Words. 
Worcester's New Pronouncing SjDeller. 
Harper's Series of Writing Books. 
Webster's Dictionaries. 



Supplementary Reading. 

American Chart. 

Modern Series Primary Reading. 
Parker's Supplementary Reading. 
Barnes's New National Readers. 
Shelclen's Fourth Reader. 
Anderson's Historical Reader. 



Periodicals. 

St. Nicholas (monthly), two copies. 

Wide Awake (monthly), two copies. 

Youth's Companion (weekly), four copies. 

Harper's Young People (weekly), four copies. 

Golden Days (weekly), four copies. 

Treasure Trove (monthly), three copies. 

The Pansy (monthly), one copy. 

Our Little Men and Women (monthly), one copy. 

Our Little Ones and The Nursery (monthly), four copies. 

Babyland (monthly) , four copies. 

Temperance Banner (weekly), four copies. 

Our Paper (weekly), one copy. 

Lyman School Enterprise (semi-monthly), one copy. 

Howard Times (weekly) , one copy. 



58 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



School Calendar for 1888-89. 

Fall term began . . Monday, Aug. 13 ; ends Nov. 2=12 weeks. 

Winter term begins . Monday, Nov. 1 2 ; ends Feb. 1=12 weeks. 

Spring term begins . . Monday, Feb. 11 ; ends May 3=12 weeks. 

Summer term begins . Monday, May 13 ; ends July 26=11 weeks. 

Number of school weeks in the year, .... 47 
Number of school days in the year, . . . . 235 

Holidays. — Washington's Birthday, one-half day, February 22. 
Fast Day, April — . 
Memorial Day, May 30. 
Independence Day, July 4. 
Labor Day, September — . 
Thanksgiving Day, November — . 
Christmas Day, December 25. 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



59 



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w 







REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS 



WESTBOROUGH. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

I herewith most respectfully submit for your consideration 
the annual statistical report of the Lyman School for Boys, 
for the year ending Sept. 30, 1888. 

I hesitate, because of my short experience here, to make 
any extended note or comment. I will venture, however, 
to call attention to the steady increase of nunrbers for the 
last three years. The records of the year 1886 showed an 
average of ninety-two boys present; those of 1887, of one 
hundred and four boys ; an increase of thirteen per cent. 
In 1888 the average number of boys was one hundred 
and twenty-seven, a clear gain of twenty-two per cent, over 
the preceding year. 

Our increased capacity, due to the remodelling of Lyman 
Hall, will be fully taxed as soon as it is available, judging 
by our present steadily increasing numbers. It seems to 
me a measure of prudence to put the house on the Wilson 
farm in shape to receive a family of boys as soon as prac- 
ticable after finishing the changes in Lyman Hall. 

Another thought constantly recurring to me is, that the 
chief hope of raising these boys above the low conception 
of life which they bring here with them, rests in enlarging 
their mental horizon. It will hardly be questioned that 
their mental development conditions to a great extent the 
possibility of a moral awakening. The fact that their hands 



64 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

are the only capital these boys possess with which to enter 
on the struggle for existence, must also be kept steadily in 
view. They need a power of thinking carried to the ends 
of their lingers. Untrained hands are for them unavailable 
capital. To carry out any plan of industrial education 
which shall be worthy of the name, means largely increased 
expenditure in the educational department of our work. 
Shall our efforts be headed in that direction, or shall we be 
content to run on in the well-worn grooves ? 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. F. CHAPIN, 

Superintendent. 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



65 



Table No. 1. 

Showing the Number received and discharged, and General Condi- 
tion of the School, for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1888. 



jooys in sciiuoi. oejji. on, 100/ , ...... 

Received. — Since committed, 


99 




Recommitted, 


2 




Returned from places, .... 


8 




" by police, 


3 




by S. B. of L. and C, 


5 




" ' voluntarily, .... 


7 




" by institution officers, 


13 


137 


Whole number in school during the year, . . 




255 


Discharged. — On probation to parents, 


31 




On probation to others, ... 


60 




To Massachusetts Reformatory, . 


6 




To State Primary School, 


3 




To State Workhouse, .... 


2 




To accompany parents out of the State, 


3 




To Overseers of Poor, .... 


2 




By elopement (4 returned), 


6 


113 


Remaining in school Sept. 30, 1888, .... 




142 


Table No. 2. 







Showing the Admissions, Number discharged, and Average Number 

of each Month. 



MONTHS. 


Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Average No. 


1887. 








October, 


8 


8 


117.64 


November, . . . 


10 


4 


122.93 


December, .... 


16 


7 


128.51 


1888. 








January, 


5 


12 


130.32 


February, 








9 


5 


130.13 


March, 








8 


5 


131.74 


April, 








4 


18 


125.83 


May, 








14 


10 


121.06 


June, 








16 


14 


126.33 


July, 








11 


6 


126.03 


August, . 








17 


17 


131.22 


September, 








19 


7 


135.16 


Totals, 








137 


113 


127.24 



QQ 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Table No. 3. 

Showing the Commitments from the Several Counties the Past Year 
and previously. 



COUNTIES. Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, .... 


3 


47 


50 


Berkshire, 








2 


207 


209 


Bristol, 








8 


530 


538 


Dukes, 








1 


11 


12 


Essex, 








10 


972 


982 


Franklin, . 








1 


52 


53 


Hampden, 








10 


328 


338 


Hampshire, 








- 


72 


72 


Middlesex, 








33 


1,029 


1,062 


Nantucket, 








- 


16 


16 


Norfolk, . 








7 


930 


937 


Plymouth, 








3 


107 


110 


Suffolk, . 








13 


1,197 


1,210 


Worcester, 








8 


656 


664 


Totals, .... 


99 


6,154 


6,253 



Table No. 4. 
Showing Nativity of Parents of Boys committed during the Year 



Fathers 


American born, 


29 


Mothers 


American born, 














32 


Fathers 


foreign born, . 














63 


Mothers 


foreign born, 














58 


Both parents American born, 














20 


Both pa 


rents foreign born, 














48 


Unknown, .... 














13 



Showing Nativity of Boys committed during the Year. 



American born, 
Foreign born, 
Unknown, . 

Total, . 



89 
10 



99 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



67 



Table No. 5. 

Showing by what Authority the Commitments have been made the 

Past Year. 



COMMITMENTS. 


Past Year. 


By District Court, 

Municipal Court, 

Police Court, 

Superior Court, 

Trial Justices, ........ 

State Board of Lunacy and Charity, .... 


35 
5 

43 
3 

11 
2 


Total, 


99 



Table No. 6. — Showing Age of Boys when committed. 



AGE. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Six, ...... 




5 


5 


Seven, 








- 


25 


25 


Eight, 








1 


116 


117 


Nine, 








1 


234 


235 


Ten, . 


, . 






2 


438 


440 


Eleven, 








11 


627 


638 


Twelve, 


, , 






15 


704 


719 


Thirteen, 
Fourteen, 








31 
36 


833 
1,051 


864 
1,087 


Fifteen, 








2 


895 


897 


Sixteen, 








_ 


930 


930 


Seventeen, 






_ 


280 


280 


Eighteen and over, 






- 


59 


59 


Unknown, 






- 


30 


30 


Total, 






• 


99 


6,227 


6,326 



68 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Table No. 7. — Showing the Domestic Condition of Boys who have 
been Inmates of the School during Year. 



CONDITION. 

Had parents, 

no parents, 

father, 

mother, 

step-father, ........ 

step-mother, 

intemperate father, 

intemperate mother, 

both intemperate parents, . 

parents separated, 

attended chnrch, 

never attended chnrch, .... 
never attended school, .... 
not attended school within one year, . 
two years, 
three years, 
been arrested before, . . . . . 
been inmates of other institutions, 
used intoxicating liquor, .... 
used tobacco (mostly cigarettes) , 
Were employed in mill or otherwise when arrested, 

idle, / . 

attending school, 

Could not read or write, ..... 

Parents owning residence, 

Members of family had been arrested, 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



69 



Table No. 8. 

Shows the Length of Time the Boys have spent in the School since 
Commitment, who have left the Past Year. 



3 mo: 


aths or less, . 






14 


2 years 3 months, . 






2 


4 mo 


iths, 








1 


2 " 4 " 






- 


5 ' 










- 


2 " • 5 " 






- 


6 ' 










1 


2 " 6 " 






- 


7 ' 










2 


2 " 7 






2 


8 ' 










1 


2 " 8 " 






- 


9 ' 










1 


2 " 9 " 






- 


10 ' 










2 


2 « 10 " 






- 


11 ' 










5 


2 " 11 






1 


1 year, . 








5 


3 years, . 






- 


1 " 1 month, 






3 


3 " 1 month, 






3 


1 " 2 months, . 






10 


3 " 2 months, 






- 


1 " 3 " 






12 


3 " 3 " 






- 


1 " 4 " 






8 


3 " 4 " 






- 


1 " 5 " 






5 


3 " 5 " 






- 


1 " 6 " 






11 


3 " 6 " 






- 


1 " 7 " 






7 


3 " 7 " 






- 


1 « 8 " 






3 


3 " 8 " 






1 


1 " 9 " 






4 


3 " 9 " 






- 


1 » 10 " 






2 


3 " 10 " 






1 


1 " 11 " 






2 


3 " 11 






- 


2 years, . 






1 


4 years and more, 




1 


2 " 1 month, 






- 


Total, 




113 


2 " 2 months, 






2 







PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



List of Articles repaired in the Sewing-room during the Year. 



Aprons, 


54 


Stockings, . 


. 5,225 


Blankets, . 


20 


Sheets, 


197 


Braces, 


18 


Spreads, 


28 


Jackets, 


. 2,213 


Table cloths, 


25 


Mittens, 


24 


Towels, 


124 


Pants, . 


. 3,353 


Vests, . 


4 


Pillow slips, 


84 








Shirts, 


. 3,749 


Total, 


. 15,118 



List of Articles made in the Sewing-room during the Year. 



Aprons, .... 97 


Pillow slips, 


222 


Braces, 






50 


Napkins, . 


57 


Books, 






110 


Shirts, 


199 


Bed ticks, . 






20 


Sheets, 


133 


Bolster cases, 






8 


Suspenders, 


37 


Caps, . 






119 


Table cloths, 


21 


Collars, 






134 


Towels, 


95 


Coffee bags, 
Dusters, 






3 










22 


Total, . 


1,354 


Dish towels, 






27 







Laundry Work. 

Number of Pieces washed and ironed in Laundry during the Year 
Washed and ironed, ....... 138,612 

Starched, .... 4,457 



Total, 



143,069 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



71 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



1887 — October, received from the State Treasurer, 

November, " " " 

December, " " " 

1888 — January, 

February, " " " 

March, " " " 

April, 

May, 

June, " " " 

July, 

August, " " " 

September, " " " 



12,075 65 


1,643 12 


1,712 33 


3,744 96 


2,351 95 


1,997 56 


2,896 08 


2,487 53 


2,082 49 


2,305 82 


3,918 80 


1,896 68 


$29,112 97 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 

1887 — October, $2,075 65 

November, 1,643 12 

December, . . 1,712 33 

1888 — January, 3,744 96 

February, 2,351 95 

March, 1,997 56 

April, 2,896 08 

May, 2,487 53 

June, 2,082 49 

July, 2,305 82 

August, 3,918 80 

September, 1,896 68 

$29,112 97 



72 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Amount drawn from State Treasury. 

Special Appropriation for Repairs on Willow Park Buildings, Lyman 
School for Boys. 

1887 — October, $1,505 15 

November, . 198 58 

December, 9 75 

1888 -April, 615 27 

$2,328 75 
Amount drawn from State Treasury. 

Special Appropriation for Superintendent's and Officers' 1 House. 

1888 — August, $844 30 

September, 1,601 58 

$2,445 88 
Expenditures. 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Repairs on Willow 
Park Buildings. 

1887 — October, $1,505 15 

November, 198 58 

December, 9 75 

1888 — April, 615 27 

$2,328 75 
Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Superintendent's and 

Officers' House. 

1888 — August, |844 30 

September, 1,601 58 

$2,445 88 
Expenditures for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1888. 

Salaries of officers and employees, $11,848 42 

Wages of other persons temporarily employed, . * . 515 70 

Provision and grocery supplies, including — 

Meat, 1,279 34 

Fish, 371 68 

Fruit and vegetables, 134 62 

Flour and bread, 2,263 92 

Grain, feed and meal for stock, 804 82 

Tea, coffee and chocolate, 180 58 

Carried forward, $17,399 08 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



73 



Brought forward, 
Sugar and molasses, . 
Milk, butter and cheese, . 
Other groceries and provisions, 
Clothing of all kinds, 
Fuel and lights, 
Medicines and medical supplies, 



School property, "books and supplies, 

Ordinary repairs, .... 

Blacksmithing, horse and cattle shoeing, 

Express, freight and passenger fares, 

Stationery, postage, telegrams and newspapers, 

Seeds, plants and fertilizers, farm tools and repairing same, 

Rent and water, .... 

Miscellaneous, 



? 17,399 08 

750 70 

635 30 

834 27 

2,286 99 

2,109 02 

79 26 

608-17 

321 95 

587 60 

106 16 

743 48 

343 13 

330 81 

670 00 

1,307 05 

$29,112 97 



Superintendent's Report of Cash Transactions. 







Farm 

Produce 

Sales. 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Sales. 


Labor 

of 
Boys. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


1887. 














October, . 


Received cash from,. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


November, 


" •< . 


- 


- 


- 


$1 08 


$1 08 


December, 


" . 


$13 57 


- 


$1 75 


- 


15 32 


1888. 














January, . 




( U «( 


8 00 


$1 50 


- 


- 


9 50 


February, 




< it a 


3 75 


- 


50 


23 09 


27 34 


March, 




« u . 


33 00 


- 


- 


- 


33 00 


April, 




« . 


38 18 


8 02 


873 18 


21 54 


940 92 


May, . . 




" . 


23 40 


- 


16 00 


- 


39 40 


June, 




" . 


- 


- 


4 50 


- 


4 50 


July, . . 




« . 


25 14 


- 


15 35 


- 


40 49 


August, . 




« 


25 19 


3 35 


•25 


- 


28 79 


September, 




" . 


103 96 


- 


379 45 


- 


483 41 


Totals, . 






$274 19 


912 87 


$1,290 98 


$45 71 


$1,623 



74 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Superintendent's Report of Cash Transactions-— Disbursements. 







Farm 

Produce 

Sales. 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Sales. 


Labor 

of 
Boys. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


1887. 












October, . Faid State Treasurer, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


November, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


December, 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1888. 














January, . 


« 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


February, . 


.< 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


March, 




$58 32 


$1 50 


$2 25 


mi 17 


$86 24 


April, 


is ii a 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


June, 


t , tt 


61 58 


8 02 


893 00 


21 54 


984 82 


July,. . 


« 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


August, . 


" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


September, 




154 29 


3 35 


395 05 


- 


552 69 


Totals, . 


' $274 19 


$12 87 


$1,290 9S 


$45 71 


$1,623 75 



1888,] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



75 



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76 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of State Primary and Reform Schools. 

The hospital report of the Lyman School for Boys, for 
the year ending at this date, is as follows : — 



Whole number of cases 




Tonsillitis, . 


17 


treated, .... 


118 


Accidents, 


8 


Slight ailments, . 


84 


Pneumonia, . 


1 


Recorded cases, 34 : viz., — 




Cholera morbus, . 


2 


Scarlet-fever, . 


1 


Inteimittent fevjr, 


1 


Simple fever, . 


2 


Concussion of brain, . 


1 


Myalgia, . 


1 







all ending in recovery. 

The patient with scarlet-fever was at once isolated, pre- 
ventive treatment was given the family of which he was a 
member, and the house thoroughly disinfected. The inva- 
sion was October 6. All the symptoms were well 'marked 
and typical, — no other case occurred. The case of pneu- 
monia was severe and alarming, but of short duration. 

A case of intermittent fever occurred in August, — a rare 
disease here, this being the only case in six years. The 
typical symptoms, with the prompt cure by appropriate 
treatment, placed the diagnosis beyond question. 



Whole number of fractured 
bones, 8 : viz., — 
Leg, 



Upper arm, 
Forearm, 



These were all successfully adjusted, and healed without 
any deformity. 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



77 



Whole number of visits made to the school, 143, as fol- 
lows : — 



October, 


17 


April, . 


10 


November, . 


9 


May, . 


16 


December, . 


18 


June, 


10 


January, 


14 


July, . 


10 


February, 


7 


August, 


15 


March, . 


8 


September, . 


9 



In August an inspection was made, and all boys who did 
not show good scars were vaccinated. 



Respectfully submitted, 



Westborough, Sept. 30, 1888. 



F. E. COREY, 

Physician. 



8 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



FARMER'S REPORT. 



To T. F. Chapin, Superintendent. 

Sik : — I herewith submit my first annual report. 

There has been more of the farm work done by the boys 
this year, and less help hired. The masters of the different 
families have taken interest in their work, and that portion 
of the farming which fell to their lot has been faithfully dis- 
charged. The good effect of out-door employment for the 
boys is very plain. The great variety of crops that we cul- 
tivate in gardening and general farming, with the improved 
implements and machines which are on the farm, afford the 
boys rare opportunities to become acquainted with the best 
methods of sowing and planting, of applying commercial 
fertilizer and stable manure, and with the marketing and 
storing of the crops of the farm. 

The vegetable crops are of good quality, and we have an 
abundant supply for winter use. The hay crop was large, 
being eighty-five tons of English hay. 

The old pair of bay horses were exchanged for younger 
ones, which have proved to be excellent workers. With 
the laro;e amount of oTadino; and ^ravellin^, we have found 
the additional yoke of oxen purchased very useful. This 
gives us two yoke of oxen and four horses, with which to 
do the teaming work. 

There have been five cows killed for beef, and only one 
was found to be free from tuberculosis ; the other four were 
worthless. I have recommended to free the barns so far as 
possible from germs of the disease, and to replace the pres- 
ent stock with a new herd of presumably healthy animals. 
The present herd is unprofitable. The farm account has 
been kept under the direction of the State Auditor, and in 
compliance with the law (chapter 87 of the Acts of 1887). 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



79 



The appended schedules will show a full statement of the 
farm's management for the current year. 



Summary of Farm Account, for Twelve Months ending Sept. 

30, 1888. 

Dr. 



Live stock and farm implements, as appraised 

Sept. 30, 1887, 
Blacksmithing, 
Board, .... 
Fertilizer, 
Furnishings, 
Farm supplies, 
Grain and meal, 
Incidental expenses, 
Labor, extra, by day, 
Labor, grinding, 
Labor, boys, 

Live stock, horses and cattle, 
Poultry, hens, . 
Repairs, .... 
Seeds, .... 
Tools, .... 
Wages, pay-roll, 
Water, .... 

Net gain for twelve months, 



dr. 

Farm produce, as appraised Sept. 30, 1887, 

Apples, 25 barrels, . 

Asparagus, 417 bunches, . 

Beef, 478 pounds, . 

Beet greens, 6 bushels, 

Beets, 171 bushels, . 

Barley fodder, 4 tons, 

Blackberries, 328 quarts, 

Cucumbers, 256 dozen, . 

Cucumbers (pickling), 8i bushels, 

Corn fodder, 15 tons, 

Crab apples, 1\ bushels, . 

Cash for asparagus sold, 30 bunches, 

Cash for blackberries sold, 80 quarts, 

Cash for labor, .... 

Cash for milk sold, 918 quarts, 



$3,575 


00 


69 


51 


289 


09 


121 


23 




50 


14 


45 


554 33 


4 


10 


48 


55 


24 


90 


227 


54 


1,039 


00 


19 


95 


22 


82 


93 


35 


24 


29 


623 


86 


45 


00 




&6 7Q7 4.7 




'fl)U , 1 J I T: r 




853 35 




$7,650 82 


§3,093 00 


62 50 


65 


72 


26 


29 


2 


40 


11 


60 


24 


00 


49 


09 


36 


48 


5 


10 


75 


00 


1 


20 


3 


00 


9 


06 


4 


50 


20 


m 



80 PRIMARY AND REFOEM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 


( lash for service, $2 00 


Cash for pork, 515 pounds, 






28 27 


Cash for pigs, 






124 91 


Cash for strawberries, 619 boxes, . 






79 99 


Cash for strawberry plants, 






3 40 


Eggs, 127 dozen, 






30 23 


Currants, 12 boxes, .... 






1 56 


Hay, 31 tons, ..... 






63 00 


Labor for institution, men and teams, 






1,537 02 


Lettuce, 






1 50 


Melons, 400, ..... 






80 00 


Meadow hay, 1 ton, .... 






5 00 


Milk, 48,451 quarts, 






1,440 37 


New potatoes, 50 bushels, 






50 00 


Onions, 1^ bushels, .... 






1 80 


Oats fodder, 3 tons, .... 






21 00 


Pears, 10 bushels, .... 






14 00 


Pease, 75 bushels, .... 






150 00 


Potatoes, 14 bushels, 






15 40 


Pork, 2,012 pounds, .... 






139 96 


Poultry, 79 pounds, .... 






11 11 


Raspberries, 134 quarts, . 






20 00 


String beans, 8 bushels, . 






5 35 


Summer squash, 91 bushels, . 






18 35 


Sweet corn, 640 dozen ears, . 






128 00 


Strawberries, 454 quarts, 






68 10 


Shelled beans, . . . . . 






21 60 


Tomatoes, 15 bushels, 






36 60 


Turnips, 8 bushels, .... 






6 80 


Veal, 520 pounds, .... 






55 90 

$7,650 82 



Produce of the Farm on Hand Oct. 1, 

at School. 

Apples, 100 barrels, 
Apples, cider, 100 bush., 
Beets, 250 bushels, 
Cabbage, 1 290 heads, . 
Corn, sweet, 50 bushels, 
Corn, shelled, 300 bash., 
Corn fodder, 21 tons, . 
Carrots, 125 bushels, . 
English hay, 85 tons, . 
Meadow hay, 10 tons, . 
Melons, 1,000, 



18? 



AND NOT DELIVERED 



$100 


00 


10 


00 


100 00 


100 


00 


62 


50 


195 00 


147 


00 


31 


25 


1,445 


00 


50 00 


50 


00 



Onions, 132 bushels, 


$132 00 


Potatoes, 627 bushels, . 


376 20 


Parsnips, 75 bushels, . 


37 50 


Pears, 20 bushels, . 


15 00 


Ruta-baga turnips, 75 




bushels, 


7 50 


Turnips, 325 bushels, . 


32 50 


Squash, 4 tons, 


120 00 



$3,011 45 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



81 







Farm Sales. 




Asparagus, . 




$3 00 


Strawberries, 


$79 9 


Blackberries, 




9 06 


Strawberry plants, 


3 40 


Cabbage, 




2 90 


Turnips, 


2 00 


Milk, . 




20 66 








Pork, . 




28 27 




1274 19 


Pigs, 




124 91 










Live Stock. 




Bull, one, 




$40 00 [ Horse, " Ned,' 1 


$60 00 


Boars, two, . 




17 00 


Pair bay horses, 


500 00 


Breeding sows, se^ 


ren, . 


120 00 


Mare, " Dollie," . 


125 00 


Cows and he 


ifers, 




" Jennie,' 1 . 


50 00 


twenty-five, 




702 00 


Oxen (two yoke), 


285 00 


Fowls, thirty-two, 




19 20 


Pigs, ten, 


30 00 


Hogs, thirteen, 
Horse, " Major, Jr 




130 00 

250 00 






5 




$2,328 20 


Including wagons 


machin 


es, tools, 


etc., .... 


$1,771 85 



Summary. 

Produce on hand, $3,011 45 

Produce sold, 274 19 

Produce consumed, 2,745 01 

■ $6,030 65 

Live stock, 2,328 20 

Agricultural implements, 1,771 85 

$10,130 70 
Respectfully submitted, 

I. T. SWIFT, 

Farmer. 

Westborough, Sept. 30, 1888. 



82 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



SUMMARY. 



Real Estate. 



Fifty-eight acres tillage, , 
Thirty-six acres pasturage, 
Brady land, 
Willow Park land, . 



Superintendent's house, 

" Theodore Lyman Hall 

" Hillside Cottage," . 

" Maple Cottage," 

" Willow Park," . 

Chapel, 

Farm barn and sheds, 

Horse barn, 

Willow Park hall, . 

Willow Park barn, 

Coal sheds, . 



Buildings. 



$10,800 00 
1,800 00 
1,300 00 
1,500 00 



$3,000 00 

37,000 00 

15,000 00 

3,500 00 

5,600 00 

3,700 00 

1,200 00 

2,000 00 

400 00 

100 00 

300 00 



$15,400 00 



$71,800 00 



Personal Estate. 
Beds and bedding, inmates, 
Carriages and agricultural implements, . 
Dry goods, . . . 

Drugs, medicines and surgical instruments, 
Fuel and oil, ...... 

Library, . 

Live stock, . 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . 
Other furniture, inmates, .... 
Personal property superintendent's department 
Provisions and groceries, .... 

Produce on hand, 

Ready-made clothing, .... 



Total, 



$1,948 51 
1,771 85 

305 80 

300 00 
1,550 00 

576 00 
2,328 20 
2,998 30 

444 45 
6,587 61 

472 74 
3,011 45 
2,105 83 



$24,400 74 



$111,600 74 



GEO. T. FAYERWEATHER, 
G. P. HEATH, 

Appraisers. 
A true copy. Attest : T. F. Chapin, Supt. 
Westborough, Sept. 30, 1888. 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



83 



LIST OF SALARIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



T. F. Chapin, superintendent, . 

H. Irving Skillings, assistant superintendent, 

Mrs. T. F. Cliapin, matron, 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Howard, charge of family 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Howe, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Norton, charge of family 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Bean, charge of family, 

F. E. Corey, M.D., physician, . 

Mrs. H. I. Skillings, teacher, 

Miss Carrie Dana, teacher, 

Miss M. Blanche Nason, teacher, 

Miss Mary L. Pettit, teacher, . 

Miss Winnie Austin, teacher, . 

Mrs. I. T. Swift, cook and nurse, 

Miss Mary Greeley, seamstress, 

Miss Mabel Mitchell, laundress, 

J. W. Clark, engineer, 

W. H. Powers, carpenter, $1.50 per day 

J. H. Cummings, overseer, 

J. T. Perkins, steward, 

Alliston Greene, teacher of printing, 

I. T. Swift, farmer, .... 

B. E Robertson, farm hand, $25 per month. 

C. I W. Robinson, acting watchman, $1.50 per day. 



f 1,600 00 


500 00 


400 00 


800 00 


700 00 


700 00 


600 00 


150 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


250 00 


250 00 


900 00 


500 00 


400 00 


400 00 


300 00 



84 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



f 



C 
53 



>5 



sa 
o 

S- 

55 



> 



s 

V) 

a 

2 
6 


00 C « N O O '-J OC C5 CO -^ O O X H N N K X) CM t© Ci r)i H 
CO CO lO CMOOt>CO<MCM-HCOCOrH i—l ri i-( 


o 
o 

w 
o 


of 

d 

o 

tco 
cv:o 
CM 
































1© (N'o !© u5!Cto:o--D[o dooo^b b^oo^o ta ^'OS'OO'C^CJllO 
l« ~-M TW (NCCMJMC^CO ri,C0(M5O'"to |W r-i CO — i CO "" 'CO (NOS«l00iH|WC^O!r-l|M 

t— lr- 1 HHrlH i— ( t— 1 1— 1 


i 

'2 

1 

w 


4^T 

O 

d 

CO 




















Assistant Superintendent, 
Matron, .... 


:' family, . 
per and nurse, 


Supply officer, 


Charge o: 

Physician 
Teacher, 

Ilousekee 


H 

< 
ft 


d 

o 

H 






















• 




II. E. Swan, . 

II. Irving Skillings, 

Mrs. T. E. Chapin, 


Mrs. II. E. Swan, . 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Ilowarc 
Mr. and Mrs. A. E. llowe, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Norton, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. II. Bean, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Parker, 
E. E. Corey, M.D., . 
Mrs. H. I. Skillings, 
Miss Carrie Dana, . 
Miss M. Blanche Nason, 
Miss Mary L. Pettit, 
Miss Winnie Austin, 
Miss Ilattie K. Hovey, . 
Miss Edith M. Bradshaw, 
Miss S. E. Kenney, 
Miss Mary Mack, . 
Mrs. L. J. Perry, . 
Mrs. I. T. Swift, . 
Mrs. M. Perkins, . 
Mrs. Charles II. Howard, 
Mrs. B. E. Robertson, . 
Miss Jennie E. Perry, . 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



85 



NiONOJCOOWtNuOOOOiCWO^C^'OtNHOl^T-l 

N (M r)i O O O O h CC O H -) 'O tH Ci © N H GO CC CO CM 
t— I HriHCO^ O CO CM i— It— I H n H CO 



toteHlcHooojcolo^boe Ho -*(eolo |o-*|o 

I H|eeW,M'M;?:i-i;M^-|(M"*']MHM <M|M t-<|C<5r^|O5'"ln»M|C0 

CO>OH^I>iOI>(M(M (N (M H N CO O iO 


cq|o Jo 
i— ijco |eo 


ioHo |o 1© 
1ccm|co |m |eo 

uO ^ b- oq 

T— 1 


















"~2 „ 
d - 


U 

<V 

o 

d 


It tt 

Watchman, 
Farm hand, 


M 
O .. - 

3 p 

CO .£3 

53 g 3 


m 

CO 

as 


S a; 
fl c3 


Overseer, 
Steward, . 
Master, . 
Teacher of pr] 

Farmer, . 



Pfr2 5?^^^0? 1 

e E.SJ b J.8^f:^WH Ja^iwS-^l^riw 



SG 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Schedule of Persons temporarily employed at the Lyman School 
for Boys, within the Year ending Sept. 30, 1888. 



Ministers, 

C. A. Harrington, . 




Mason work, 




|260 00 
102 14 


Gr. T. Fayerweather, 
G. P. Heath, . 




ApjDraiser, . 




40 00 
18 00 


William Burke, 




Laborer, 




11 25 


George H. Woodman & Co., 




Labor,* 




15 48 


Charles Kelley, 
Paul Dujay, 
Charles Hayden, 
Thomas Giblin, 




Laborer, 

u 
a 
it 




13 50 
13 13 
12 20 

7 20 


C. B. Frost & Co., . 




Labor,* 




5 95 


Mrs. B. E. Robertson, 




Making mittens, 




4 80 


Anthony Kearns, 




Laborer, 




4 40 


W. H. Weld, . 




Labor, 




3 00 


J. L. Fairbanks, 




Labor on book, 




85 


William Allen & Sons, . 




Piping, 




3 80 










$515 70 



On culinary utensils. 



SUPERINTENDENTS. 



Date of 
Appointment. 



1848, 

1853, 

1857, 

1861, 

1867, 

1868, 

May, 1873, 

Aug., 1878, 

Dec., 1880, 

Oct., 1881, 

July, 1885, 

July, 1888, 



William R. Lincoln, 
James M. Talcott, 
William E. Starr, 
Joseph A. Allen, . 
Orville K. Hutchinson, 
Benjamin Evans, . 
Allen G. Shepherd, 
Luther H. Sheldon, 
Edmund T. Dooley, 
Joseph A. Allen, . 
Henry E. Swan, . 
Theodore F. Chapin. 



Date of 
Retirement. 



1853 
1857 
1861 
1867 
1868 
1873 
1878 
1880, 
1881. 
1885 
1888 



May, 

Aug., 

Dec, 

Oct., 

April, 

July, 

Still in office. 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



87 



TRUSTEES. 



Names, Residences, Commissions and Retirement of the Trustees 
of the /State Reform School, from the Commencement to the 
Present Time. 



Date of 






Date of 




NAMES. 


Residence. 




Commission. 






Retirement. 


1847, 


Nahum Fisher,* 


Westborough, . 


1849 


1847, 


John W. Graves, 


Lowell, . 


1849 


1847, 


Samuel Williston, 


Easthampton, . 
New Becfford, . 


1853 


1847, 


Thomas A. Green,* . 


1860 


1847, 


Otis Adams,* 


Grafton, . 


1851 


1847, 


George Denney,* 


Westborough, . 


1851 


1847, 


William P. Andrews,* 


Boston, 


1851 


1849, 


William Livingston,* 


Lowell, . 


1851 


1849, 


Hussell A. Gibbs,* 


Lanesborough,. 


1853 


1851, 


George H. Knhn, 


Boston, 


1855 


1851, 


J. B. French,* . 


Lowell, 


1854 


1851, 


Daniel H. Forbes, 


Westborough, . 


1854 


1851, 


Edward B Bigelow,* 


Grafton, . 


1855 


1853, 


J. W. H. Page,* 


New Bedford, . 


1856 


1853, 


Harvey Dodge, . 


Sutton, 


1867 


1854, 


G. Howlancl Shaw,* . 


Boston, 


1856 


1854, 


Henry W. Cushman,* 


Bernardston, . 


1860 


1855, 


Albert H. Nelson,* . 


Wo burn, . 


1855 


1855, 


Joseph A. Fitch, 


Hopkinton, 


1858 


1855, 


Parley Hammond, 


Worcester, 


1860 


1856, 


Simon Brown, . 


Concord, . 


1860 


1856, 


John A. Fayerweather, 


Westborough, . 


1859 


1857, 


Josiah H. Temple, . 


Framingham, . 


1860 


1858, 


Judson S. Brown, 


Fitchburg, 


1860 


1859, 


Theodore Lyman, 


Brookline, 


1860 


1860, 


George C. Davis,* 


Northborough, 


1873 


1860, 


Carver Hotchkiss, 


Shelburne, 


1863 


1860, 


Julius A. Palmer, 


Boston, 


1862 


1860, 


Henry Chickering, . 


Pittsfield, . 


1869 


1860, 


George W. Bentley, . 


Worcester, 


1861 


1860, 


Alden Leland, . 


Holliston, 


1864 


1861, 


Pliny Nickerson, 


Boston, 


1868 


1861, 


Samuel G. Howe,* 


Boston, 


1863 


1862, 


Benjamin Boynton,* . 


Westborough, . 


1864 


1863, 


J. H. Stephenson, 


Boston, 


1866 


1863, 


John Ayres, 


Charlestovvn, . 


1867 



Deceased. 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. '88, 
Names, Residences, etc , of Trustees — Concluded. 



Date of 
Commission. 



NAMES. 



Date of 
Retirement. 



1864 
1864 
1865 
1866 
1867 
1868 
1868 
1868 
1869 
1871 
1871 
1872 
1873 
1873 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877 
1877 
1878 
1878 
1878 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1884 
1884 
1886 
1887 
1888 



A. E. Goodnow, 
Isaac Ames, 
Jones S. Davis, . 
Joseph A. Pond,* 
Stephen G. Deblois, 
John Ayres, 
Harmon Hall, . 
L. L. Goodspeed, 
E. A. Hubbard, . 
Lucius W. Pond, 
John W. Olmstead, 
Moses H. Sargent, 
A. S. Woodworm, 
Edwin B. Harvey, 
W. H. Baldwin, 
John L. Cummings, 
Jackson B. Swett, 
Samnel R. Heywood, 
Milo Hildreth, . 
Lyman Belknap,* 
Franklin Williams,* 
Robert Couch, . 
John T. Clark, . 
M. J. Flatley, . 
Adelaide A. Calkins, 
Lyman Belknap, 
Anne B. Richardson, 
Milo Hildreth, . 
George W. Johnson, 
Samuel R. Heywood, 
Elizabeth C. Putnam, 
Thomas Dwight, 
M. H. Walker, . 
J. J. O'Connor, . 
Elizabeth G. Evans, 
Chas. L. Gardner, 
H. C. Greeley, . 



Worcester, 

Haverhill, 

Holyoke, . 

Brighton, . 

Boston, 

Medf'ord, . 

Saugus, . 

Bridgewater, 

Springfield, 

Worcester, 

Boston, 

Newton, . 

Boston, 

Westborough, 

Boston, 

Ashburnham, 

Haverhill, 

Wore ester, 

Northborough, 

Westborough, 

Boston, 

Newburyport, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Springfield, 

Westborough, 

Lowell, 

Northborough, 

Brookfield, 

Worcester, 

Boston, 

Boston, 

Westborough, 

Holyoke, . 

Boston, 

Palmer, . 

Clinton, . 



1874 

1865 

1868 

1867 

1878 

1874 

1871 

1872 

1877 

1875 

1873 

1877 

1876 

1878 

1876 

1879 

1878 

1879 

1879 

1879 

1879 

1879 

1879 

1881 

1880 

1884 

1886 
Still in ofiice. 

1887 

1888 
Still in office. 

1884 
Still in ofiice. 



* Deceased. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



STATE INDUSTKIAL SCHOOL FOR GffiLS 



LANCASTER. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Beform Schools. 

It becomes a duty, at the close of the year, to submit to 
you a report of the State Industrial School ; but your visits 
have been so frequent that it seems hardly necessary to 
inform you of that with which you are already familiar. 

In reviewing the weeks and months just passed, we find 
that the daily life and events of the school are more or less 
the same as in former years ; yet new faces and characters 
have brought to us new interests and cares. 

The theory of governing mainly by kindness and pleasant 
words has been carried out, and is proving a success. The 
time is so completely filled with work and school, and the 
minds of the girls have been so occupied, that good order 
and discipline have prevailed, with few exceptions. 

The girls have done nearly all the work in the garden, 
and much on the farm and about the grounds. They have 
painted ninety-nine rooms of the girls and officers, through- 
out, as paint is so much more desirable, in an institution, 
than paper or whitewash. They have also painted a large 
part of the farm-house and out-buildings. 

There have been made 442 dresses, and underclothes 
accordingly ; they have knit 273 pairs of stockings and 
mittens. They have also taken great interest in putting up 
fruit and making pickles. There have been 507 cans of 
fruit put up, 117 gallons of pickles made; they have also 
dried apples in the old-fashioned way. We think work of 
this kind better and safer for them than a trade, because 
housework in a private family is the only life that affords 
for them sufficient protection after they leave the school. 



92 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Allowing a girl to board, and work in a shop or factory, 
gives a freedom which they would too often abuse. The 
successful placing out of girls is due largely to the faithful 
care of the auxiliary visitors. 

The school is carefully classified into four families, not by 
the age of the girls, but by their history : for instance, it 
has been necessaiy to place some girls thirteen } T ears of age 
with the worst girls ; but one who was nearly seventeen 
when committed, having now been at a place two years, this 
year received a prize as one of the most deserving. 

The girls have earned nothing to refund the Slate, except 
by what has been saved by their work on the farm, painting, 
etc. As soon as a girl who is teachable becomes in any way 
helpful, she is sent to a place to earn money for herself, 
while some new girl takes her place in the school, to be 
taught and sent out in the same manner ; thus making the 
school not a place of detention, but a training school for 
those who are capable of becoming self-supporting. 

True economy in the management of the school is to be 
measured by the number of girls restored to society, fitted 
for usefulness,, and inclined toward honest toil. This is the 
final product, and by this the work of the school can be 
judged. If an opportunity has been given wayward, erring 
girls, who have never known that there were possibilities 
before them, to seek a better life, and their hearts and con- 
sciences have been appealed to in such a manner as to bring 
forth fruit in their lives, the object of the school has been 
accomplished. Even when their conduct after leaving the 
school is not satisfactory, the influence will not be wholly 
out of sight, but will come to them in after years, and 
perhaps help them over many rough places. If some of the 
most promising disappoint us, and our work with them 
seems lost, the same faith that inspired us in the beginning 
must give us new inspiration to work on, if not by sight, by 
faith in Him who has promised both seed-time and harvest. 

The health of the girls, with few exceptions, has been 
good. One young girl was returned from her place, last 
December, in consumption. She was cared for in the school 
by the matron and girls at House Xo. 5 till April, when she 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 93 

died, and was buried in the little cemetery belonging to the 
school. A stone has since been placed there to mark the 
spot where she was laid. In her last hours she expressed 
herself as being grateful for kind friends and a good home. 
Thanks to the Hospital Newspaper Society for valuable 
reading and Christmas cards, also to other friends who have 
so kindly taken interest in the welfare of the school. 

Respectfully, 

L. L. BRACKETT, 

Superintendent. 



94 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



STATISTICS. 



During this year there have been within the school for more or 
less time, 



157 



In the school Sept. 30, 1887, 58 

Returned to the school, having been placed out in former 

years, 53 

New commitments, 46 

Total, . . . . — 157 



The following disposition was made of these girls : 



In the school Sept. 30, 1888, 

In place, .... 

With friends (behaving well) 

Married, . 

Almshouse or at board, 

Reformatory Prison, 

Ran away, . 

Discharged, 

Died, .... 



Come of age, 



Total, 



During the year there have been sent out from the school. 

There have been returned (including the 53 from former years 

placing), 

for illness, 

change of place, .... 
visit (during absence of employer), 
unsatisfactory conduct, 
theft or other bad conduct, . 
Total, 



63 
51 

9 
6 
2 
8 
4 
9 
1 
4 



157 
*104 

66 



10 

23 

3 

12 
18 
— 66 



* Of the 104 sent out, there were placed once, . 

twice, . 
" three times, 

" " four times, 



82 
16 

5 

1 
— 104 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



95 



Total in custody Sept. 30, 1887, 

Committed this year, . 

Total in custody during the year (including the 157 

already accounted for), . . . ... 

Of whom there have attained their majority, . 

Discharged by vote for good conduct, .... 
" " nearly twenty-one years of age, 

" " as unfit subjects for the school, 

" " as defective in intellect, . 

Died, 

Total who have come of a^e, been discharged, or died 



At work in families, 

At work elsewhere, 

On probation with friends, 

Married in former years, not yet twenty-one, 

Married this year, 

Total self-supporting, 

In the school Sept. 30, 1888, . 
In Almshouse or at board, 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison in former years, 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison this year, 
Total still supported at cost of the State, 

Ran away former years, not yet recovered, 

Ran away this year, 



235 

16 

— 281 

25 

4 
13 

4 

8 

2 

— 56 

*79 
1 

20 
16 
16 



63 
3 

6 

8 

7 
6 



132 



80 



13 



Total still in care of the Trustees, 



225 



Of those committed this year 



12 could read and write. 
3 " not write. 



1 could neither read nor write. 



38 attended church regularly 
7 " " seldom. 



1 never attended church. 



2 were 12 years of age. 
I "13 
6 " 14 



11 were 15 years of age. 
21 " 16.' 
2 " 11 



36 were born in Massachusetts. 
1 " New Jersey. 

1 " Kansas. 

1 " Italy. 

2 " Nova Scotia. 



1 born in New Brunswick 

1 " Canada. 

2 " Ireland. 
1 " Maine. 



* Of this number, two with friends and three at work in other families are not only 
supporting themselves but also an illegitimate child. 



96 



PEIMAEY AND KEFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct 



21 American parentage. 




1 Portuguese parentage. 




4 " colored " 




1 German " 




8 Irish parentage. 




1 Italian " 




3 English " 




1 Indian " 




3 Scotch 




1 parentage unknown. 




1 French " 








Stubbornness, . 


. 27 


Assault and battery, 


1 


Larceny, .... 


. 12 


Fornication, .... 


1 


Lewdness, 


. 2 


Night-walking, ... 


1 


Vagrancy, 


. 2 






Orphans, .... 


. 11 


Both parents living, 


20 


One parent living, . 


. 15 






Current expenses, . 




$18,835 79 




Cash received, returned to State treasury, . 633 20 








118,202 


59 



Average number of inmates, 71^. 



Dividing the current 
expenses by the average number of inmates gives an 

average annual cost of 

Weekly cost of 



§254 80 
4 90 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY. 



Chapel, . 

House No. 1, . . 

No. 2, . 

No. 4, . 

No. 5, . 
Superintendent's house, 
Storeroom, 

Farm-house and barn, 
Large barn, . 
Silo, 

Storehouse, 
Old barn, 

Carried forward, 



Real Estate. 






$3,000 00 








8,250 00 








8,500 00 








9,000 00 








3,000 00 








3,000 00 








300 00 








1,500 00 








4,500 00 








400 00 








450 00 








150 00 


142,050 00 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT -No. 18. 



97 



Brought forward, 
Wooclhouse, . 
Ice house, . , 
Storehouse No. 3, 
Piggery, . 
Reservoir house, 
New hen-house, 
Farm, 176 acres, 
Wood lot, 10 acres, 
Total value, . 



$42,050 00 




. 150 00 




. 100 00 




25 00 




. 100 00 




. 100 00 




40 00 




. 7,000 00 




. 200 00 






$49,765 00 



Personal Property. 



Property in No. 1, . 

No. 2, . 

No. 4, . 

No. 5, . 

Superintendent's house, 

chapel and library, 
Provisions and groceries, 
Dry goods, 
Hardware, 
Paint, 
Stationery, 
Fuel, 

Valuation of stock, 
Valuation of horses, 
Tools and carriages, 
Produce of farm on hand, 



$997 74 




976 81 




1,352 85 




645 52 




955 47 




650 00 




829 82 




940 80 




202 98 




63 50 




66 87 




1,392 50 




1,595 00 




650 00 




1,615 75 




2,717 14 






15,652 75 






$65,417 75 



SOLON WILDER, 
ANDREW J. BANCROFT, 

Appraisers. 



Lancaster, Oct. 1, 1888. Subscribed and sworn to before me, 



NICHOLAS FROST, 
Justice of the Peace. 



98 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Produce consumed Sept. 30, 1888. 



Milk, 31,313 quarts, 

Pork, 4,563 pounds, 

Beef, 3,692 pounds, 

Sweet corn, 

Rowen, 17 tons, 

Poultry, . 

Asparagus, 

Cabbage, 

Squash, . 

String beans, 14| bushels, 

Pease, 16^ bushels, 

Turnips, 14 bushels, 

Carrots, 1 bushel, . 

Tomatoes, 60 bushels, . 

Lettuce, .... 



$938 


19 


273 


78 


258 


44 


75 


00 


102 


00 


,15 


37 


37 


00 


16 


10 


13 


00 


14 


25 


16 


50 


o 


25 


1 


00 


35 


00 


10 


00 



Rhubarb, 


. $15 00 


Berries, . 


16 00 


Cucumbers, . 


20 00 


Eggs, . 


75 05 


Ice, .... 


100 00 


Potatoes, 50 bushels, 


32 50 


Apples, 100 bushels, 


25 00 


Pears, 4 bushels, 


4 00 


Cauliflower, . 


3 00 


Hay, 2 tons, . 


32 00 


Melons, . 


15 00 


Bedding, . 


66 30 



$2,212 73 



Produce sold and Receipts sent to State Treasurer. 





1S87-1S§§. 


Calves, . 


. $241 00 


Milk, 


Oxen, 


. 180 00 


Board, 


Pigs, 


53 00 


Labor, 


Service of animal, . 


23 00 




Fat hog, . 


18 90 





$1 80 

112 00 

3 50 

$633 20 



Produce on Hand. 



Ensilage, 85 tons, . 
English hay, 43 tons, 
Meadow hay, 2 tons, 
Oat straw, 2 tons, . 
Corn and stover, 
Pop corn, 12 bushels, 
Squash, 5,290 pounds, 
Mangels, 29 tons, . 
Rutabagas, 11 tons, 
Beets, 20 bushels, . 
Carrots, 5 bushels, . 
Parsnips, 2 bushels, 
Beans, 4 bushels, . 
Pease, 5 bushels, 
Apples, 240 barrels, 



$425 


00 


688 


00 


16 


00 


25 


00 


10 00 


12 


00 


79 


35 


290 


00 


110 


00 


10 


00 


2 


50 


1 


00 


8 


00 


5 00 


144 00 



Cabbages, 10,000 pounds, $75 00 

Celery, . . . . 15 24 

Pickles, 21 barrels, . 12 50 

Vinegar, 600 gallons, . 120 00 

Oats, 5 bushels, . 2 00 

Rye, 4 bushels, . 6 00 

Barley seed, 1 bushel, . 1 75 

Sweet corn seed, 9 bushels, 9 00 

Beans, 6 bushels, . . 15 00 

Potatoes, 531 bushels, . 334 80 

Lumber, . . . . 60 00 

Manure, 40 cords, . . 240 00 



$2,717 14 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



99 



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co 


OS 


— 


OJ 


cs 


co 


co 


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o 


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r— 1 


l— 1 


r— 1 





CO o 

OS T*< 



o 

d 

3 



S 






s 3 



100 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 









GQ 



pus Siuppoq 
'spoq 'djnjuun^i 


$11 75 
59 83 
49 96 


57 97 

41 15 

42 36 
67 10 

123 33 

9 12 
70 37 


OS 

CM 

CO 


-dns jiToipom 

PUB aillOipjjyf 


CO CO 

1-H IC 


7 05 

2 05 

16 50 

12 19 

34 25 

11 15 

30 

12 85 


o 
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$13 59 
25 39 


10 00 

4 35 

126 75 

119 00 

30 55 

1,206 28 


rH 

>o 

CO 

o 
i^ 


•019 

'sooqs 'SiuqjojD 


$151 27 
101 77 
216 35 


CO-t-COt^'OOCM(MCO 
OiNiOQOOCJH^H 

(MLQCO^t^CiCMOC; 

COO r O>0-HHOOOLQ^H 

CO r-< H(M r-i CM 


•jpis piiB ClBOS 
'suoistAoad pub 
souooojS joijjo 


$1 13 

21 70 

152 80 


COCOrHCC-fOrHOOl 

t>-fo-*ocox-*oo 

CM O CM CO — ' -H i-i OS CO 
rH-HH-HCMCO^f-rHrH 


co 
co 

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o 
co 


asooqo 

pui; jo^jna 


$31 58 
41 84 
93 49 


rH O O O CO' ~H rH 
CONO5HQ0H 

co en co cj co »h io 

CM rH CO CO CM CO 


•sossB[ora 

pue jbShs 


$29 84 
178 95 


90 
31 08 

107 80 


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p:iB ooy.00 'eaj. 


$5 60 
15 09 
39 89 


7 27 

3 33 

33 80 

2 25 
18 30 


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$97 90 

7 00 

197 75 


CM ->* <0 'O O O O CO O 

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l^ CM O OS CM OS CO iO t> 


$16 25 $1,190 37 


•jncq.q 


$4 75 
5 75 


I 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 


S0[QBJ 
->J39A piIB JU1JJ 


$4 00 
105 67 1 

2 75 


O O O O CO rH -* O 
CO CO CO O OS CO O t— 

CM CO CO rH ^H CO HCO 

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co 
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$14 54 
39 79 
12 51 


QCONHNOOOHiO 
OOHHCOOtNNiO-* 

O0iO-*iOH:OtHCM-* 
hhhhhhhhh 


CO 


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$77 34 
76 49 


12 12 

72 45 
66 03 

• 78 85 
69 64 


o 

OS 
CM 


H 
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1887. 

October, . 
November, 
December, 






1888. 

January, . 
February, . 
March, 
April, 
May, . 
June, 
July, . 
August, 
September 


"a 
o 
H 



1888.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



101 



•tejox 


$1,193 80 
1,540 22 
2,069 04 


1,388 90 
1,066 88 
1,426 21 
1,694 71 
1,733 35 
1,339 01 
2,450 49 
1,414 61 
1,518 57 


Oi 
fr- 

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GO 

OO" 


•pa.Coidoid A"[u 
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f 38 00 
10 00 
10 00 


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01 O (M N iO 
CM fr- fr- t> CO 


CO 
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co 

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$564 07 
620 97 
670 36 


CMCO-HCiCi'O'+lCO'O 
CNOtHOOOCO^H 

-+iiOCM-HCOC5COCOCr> 
03000^^00 
lOOCOCOCOCOCOCOO 


1^ 

CM 

CO 


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sno3UBi[303ipi 


o^ o 
o o *o 

O -+l CM 
CM -* 


CO o o o o o o 

t> O O O O O CM 

T-t CM CS fr- CM 

CM i—i 1^ 


CM 
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CM 


•ilOOJS 
3AI[ PUB A"bH 


$155 00 


39 00 
155 60 


O 
CO 

CO 


■caiBj joj S[Oo; 
puB saoz![iM8J 
'sjUBid 'spoay 


$ 14 55 

5 60 

114 37 


lOOCOOOOt^ o 

OCOr-IOOr-HOCTi CO 

NCOr- lOiQ't r- < t>- 
i— I i— 1 TH CO -* ^ 


o 
co 

CO 


•9DiAjes ladeqo 


$5 00 

50 00 

5 00 


OOOOOOOO'O 

ooooooooc^ 

CM CM CO CM i—l r-( C^ 


fr- 
CD 

CO 
CM 


•sjadBd 

-SAV9UpUBSmi3.lS 
-313) SQ3UOIlU)S 


$11 32 

47 53 

- 18 65 


(NHNCDCMCONOH 

O CT> CO CO COH^CCHO 
Hrtr 1 -^ i-HCMCMCO 


© 
fr- 

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CM 


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'jq.li3.ij 'sseadxa 


|81 66 
50 95 
60 77 


t> N (O C5 OT O.M O CO 

O O ■* -t iO N X i< N 
CO «o -* 1^- CM tH -^H 'xH CO 


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•DJ3 'SIOOJ 

jo atBdoj 'jjjo a 
HUius^oBia 


iO o 
CM CO 
1 

Ci 00 

■ co 


13 50 

53 90 

13 37 
69 70 


CM 

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•sanddns 
[ooqospuB siioojj. 


$1 00 
17 15 

88 


17 47 

8 67 

52 25 1 
16 00 

4 20 
40 17 

18 32 


i—l 

CO 


■sjtBdoj ^.iBu;pjo 


$0 60 

48 95 

126 37 


iCCDiOHODCOQONQ 

QONNfOONOCON 
CONOOh i—i CO CO 
CM i-i r-t CM 


OS 

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H 
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1887. 

October, . 
November, 
December, 


1888. 

January, . 
February, . 
March, 
April, 
May, . 
June, 
July, . 
August, 
September, 


o 

H 



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:; 


xi 


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102 PRIMAEY AM) REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Pay-Roll of Persons employed at the State Industrial School for 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1888. 



n a:\iks. 


Nature of Service. 


Time. 


Amount 
Paid. 


L. L. Bracken, 


Superintendent, . 


1 year, . 


$999 96 


N. C. Bracket t. 




Farmer and Steward, . 


1 " . 


650 04 


Anna Stewart, 




Mai run, 


4 months, 


116 64 


C. J. Bean, . 




" 




11 months 28 da)s, . 


347 60 


R. M. Rice, . 




" 




11 " 14 " 


333 80 


S. E. Stowe, . 




" 




10 " 23 " 


316 12 


E. P. Saunders, 




" 




7 " 22 " 


225 22 


E. M Hamlin, 




Sub. Mat! on, 




11 days, . 


10 55 


A. J. Wheeler, 




" . 




28 " . 


26 84 


H. T. Spalding, 




" 




2 months 21 days, . 


78 07 


Anna Stewart, 




Teacher, 




4 " . . 


100 00 


M. Middlemas, 




" . 




6 " . 2l£ " 


167 28 


Ella Eames, . 




" 




10 " 25 " 


270 20 


L. Barton, 




" 




11 " 18 " 


289 41 


A. J. Wheeler, 




Sub. Teacher, 




1 month 17 " 


38 52 


E. M. Hamlin, 




" . 




30 days, . 


24 63 


H. T. Spalding, 




>( i< 




28 " . 


22 99 


L. F. Greene, . 




Vacancy Officer, 




8 months 7 days, . 


222 87 


M. L. Holt, . 




<< a 




3 3 .". . 


83 53 


Margaret Torry, 




Housekeeper, 




1 year, . 


300 00 


J. P. Dunton, 




" 




1 month, . 


25 00 


K. E Saunders, 




<< 






11 months, 


275 00 


J. M. Mclntire, 




" 






1 year, 


300 00 


S. R. Houghton, 




" 






1 " . 


300 00 


M. E. Williams, 




u 






2 months 28 days, . 


73 02 


M. A. Fuller, . 




" 






3 » 16 " 


88 15 


C. Barton, 




" 






2 " 14 " 


61 12 


A Sawin, 




Sub. Housekeeper 




15 days, 


12 32 


E. M. Hamlin, 




« 




21 " . 


16 87 


A. J. Wheeler, 




" 




8 " . 


6 56 


M. V. O'Callaghan 




Physicim, 




1 year, 


200 00 


U. B. Hamlin, 




Foreman, 






1 " . 


540 00 


J. C. Rice, 




Laborer, 






11 months 14 days, . 


297 40 


F. M. Sampson, 




" 






10 " 19 " 


404 06 


Martin Dolphin, 




" 






1 month 28 " 


67 94 


0. N. Mclntire, 




" 








12 86 


E M. Hamlin, 




" 








3 16 


Richard Ward, 




Clergyman, 








10 00 


A. E. Smith, . 




" . 








5 00 


G. F. Pratt, . 












5 00 


D. B. Scott, . 




•< . 








10 00 


L. W. Morey, 




" . 








5 00 








$7,342 77 



1888.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 103 



PHYSICIAN'S KEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Beform Schools. 

I have the honor of submitting my fourth annual report 
for the year ending Sept. 30, 1888. 

The only death that has occurred at the school since I 
became connected with the institution took place this year. 
A girl of nineteen, who had been out at service for three 
years, returned with pulmonary disease well developed, and 
was placed at House No. 5. For a few weeks the change of 
residence gave hope of improvement, then the disease set in 
with renewed activity, until death took place March 29. I 
cannot speak too highly of the unvarying kindness shown this 
suffering child for those four months, both by the officers 
and girls. 

The most serious acute illness w\as an attack of peritonitis 
at House No. 1. For some ten days one of the inmates 
hovered between life and death, then a strong constitution 
prevailed, and she made a good recovery. 

We have had only four cases of specific trouble since my 
last report. Three of these have entirely recovered, the 
other is still under treatment. 

Three girls were returned to the school in a pregnant con- 
dition. One was placed at the almshouse, two sent to friends 
who agreed to care for them. 

For years the water supply of the school had been defec- 
tive, and the drainage wretched. This year there has been 
a thorough overhauling of both these important points, with 



104 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct., '88. 

decidedly good results. Since these repairs were finished 
there has not been a single case of diphtheritic sore throat, 
which had before been prevalent to some extent in all the 
houses. 

The hygienic condition is at present very satisfactory. 

Respectfully, 

MARY V. O'CALLAGHAN, M.D. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT. No. 18. 



ELEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



State Primary and Reform Schools, 



WITH THE 



ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE RESIDENT OFFICERS, 



For the Year ending Sept. 30, 1889. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1890. 



(Jfommnntoealtfr d 7$^mBKt]}U%ttt&* 



TRUSTEES' KEPORT. 



STATE PRIMAKY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. 

To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools 
respectfully present their Eleventh Annual Report of the 
three institutions committed to their care. 

STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL AT MONSON. 
Previous to 1872 all dependent children of the State were 
reared in almshouses. At that date the State Almshouse at 
Monson, where already the majority of dependent children 
were congregated, became the State Primary School, and its 
inmates were no longer classed as paupers. These inmates 
may have been drawn from three sources : they may be chil- 
dren who have become dependent through the poverty of 
their parents, through the criminal neglect of their parents, 
or through their own wrong-doing. The first class are known 
as " dependent children," and are sent to the Primary School 
by the poor-law authorities ; the second class are called 
" neglected children," and are committed by a magistrate 
to the State Board of Lunacy and Charity, by whom they 
may be placed at board or at service in private families, or 
sent to an institution ; and the latter class, the juvenile 
offenders, are in like manner sentenced to the custody of 
the State Board, their tender age or the lightness of the 

' CO 

offence commending this course to the discretion of the 
court, rather than commitment to a reform school. 

The number of inmates is mainly dependent upon the ratio 
of two forces, — upon the laws of the State under which 
children enter the institution, and upon the internal adminis- 
tration of the school under which they may go out. During 



4 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

the last ten years, new conditions have been at work, whose 
influence it is instructive to trace. 

A change in the law of settlement, in 1879, making the 
towns more largely responsible for their own poor, has 
reduced the number entering the school from the State 
Almshouse, from 122 in 1878 to 59 in 1889. As an offset, 
however, to this source of decrease, the Act of 1882, chap- 
ter 181, providing that neglected and dependent children, 
having no settlement, may be committed to the care of the 
State Board of Lunacy and Charity, has brought an average 
accession to the school of 47 children a year ; and an amend- 
ment to this law, by Act of 1888, chapter 248, allowing 
such children having a settlement to be committed to the 
State Board, " when it shall be made to appear that the place 
of legal settlement of any such children has not within its 
control any institution in which they may be lawfully main- 
tained," — it being unlawful to retain any child over three in 
an almshouse, — has raised the number committed under 
this Act from 31 in 1888 to 81 in 1889. 

As a net result of these changes, we find that the number 
of admissions has not varied materially during the last eleven 
years, but that there has been a marked change in the 
sources from which the newcomers are drawn ; for, of the 
178 admissions last year, 81 were under the " neglected and 
dependent children" laws, and thus were children for whom 
formerly no provision was made by the State. Moreover, 
while the numbers admitted have remained the same, the 
average population of the school during these years has 
fallen from 537 to 314, which decrease is due to the placing 
out of many children who would formerly have been brought 
up in the institution. The endeavor of the trustees is, that 
every child not laboring under some mental, moral or physi- 
cal defect, shall be placed out as fast as homes can be found, 
— the little ones at board, and the older ones at service. 
This is made possible by the efficient co-operation of the 
State Board of Lunacy and Charity, by whom a system has 
been elaborated, through paid officers and volunteer visitors, 
of finding such homes, and of supervising the children when 
placed. The last report of that Board gives 1,063* in place, 

* This includes the girls and boys on probation from the reform schools, as well 
as those placed directly by the Board without passing through any institution. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



and subject to its visitation ; 183 of these were boarded at 
the rate of $1.50 per week and clothes, and the remaining 
880 were placed without expense to the State, except that 
of supervision, the majority of them earning wages. This 
policy, both by diminishing the public burden and still more 
by its tendency to restore these little waifs to some healthy 
relation to the community, commends itself as one to be 
pursued whenever possible. 

The average population of the school this year was 314, 
— the smallest number yet recorded, and a decrease of 7 
over the year previous ; and that in spite of an increase in 
admissions of from 143 to 178. There were — 



In the school Oct. 1, 1887, children, .... 

" " " " " adults,* .... 

Received from State Almshouse, children, 

adults, .... 

Received from superintendent indoor poor, dependent, . 
" " " " " neglected, 

" " " " '• juvenile offenders 

" " children's hospital, ..... 

Returned, having been placed out in previous years, 

" " " *' " during current year, . 



297 
17 

53 
6 



Total, 



314 



59 
6 
75 
36 
1 
51 
31 

574 



Of these, the following disposition was made : — 

Discharged by State Board of Lunacy and Charity, children, 28 

adults, 3 

— 31 

Placed out at service, 164 

" " at board, , .23 

Removed to State Almshouse, children, . 

adults, 

Removed to children's hospital, for treatment, 

" Massachusetts General Hospital, . 

" Deaf and Dumb Asylum, Hartford, 

Eloped, ran away (adults), .... 

Died, 

Remaining in the school, . 



1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
343 



574 

* These adults are mostly mothers, who accompany their children from the alms- 
house. 



6 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Life at the Primary School is simple, and, as far as possible, 
exempt from the harrowing influences of institution life. 
Much of the farm and most of the house work and sewing 
is performed by the boys and girls ; considerable variety of 
occupation being thus introduced, and of a kind calculated in 
a measure to prepare them for the country households where 
they will soon be placed. Most of the children over ten 
are thus occupied during half the day, their schooling being 
confined to the afternoon session. 

The school-room has Ions: been the most interesting feature 
of the institution ; for the teaching has been thorough and 
intelligent, and in the various grades, from the kindergarten 
to the grammar, are seen the steps by which the childish 
mind develops. In this department, moreover, great ad- 
vances have been recently made ; for the superintendent has 
introduced methods of teaching adopted from Prof. Felix 
Adler's Workingman's School in New York, and from the 
public schools of Springfield, which have resulted in a 
marked awakening of the pupils' faculties. The little ones 
are now taught to do their sums by beads strung ou a wire, 
thus early learning what numbers really mean. A study of 
form and proportion and of facility in the use of eye and 
hand is taught in the primary departments by a system of 
drawing and paper-folding, and in the grammar grades by 
clay modelling and carpentering ; and nothing could be more 
gratifying than to see the eager interest of the children in 
their new pursuits. Between 60 and 70 boys receive instruc- 
tion each week in the carpenter shop, — awkward little urchins 
of twelve years and upward, some of whom have already 
learned to handle tools neatly ; and in the modelling room 
18 boys and 24 girls work once a week, and are acquiring 
skill which will stand them in good stead whatever may be 
their future part in life. The trustees feel that the superin- 
tendent cannot be sufficiently commended for his introduction 
of these improved methods of instruction, nor the teachers 
for the patience and zeal with which they have co-operated 
with him. 

This stimulating training would lead naturally to an in- 
creased vivacity in the children, both in their work and play. 
A change has no doubt taken place in this respect ; but the 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 

new methods of teaching have been in operation too short a 
time to attribute the improvement entirely to this cause. 
During the last eighteen months, however, the standard of 
clothing and feeding the children has been gradually raised ; 
their diet now gives a larger supply of the nutriment sup- 
posed to induce energy ; and the girls, who in winter now 
wear underflannels and close-fitting sacks, instead of the 
old cloaks, which used to fly open and leave the arms and 
chest exposed, have been induced to forsake the steam coils 
round which they used to hang, and to romp freely out of 
doors. The living is still far from luxurious, for the trustees 
feel that no evil for the children could be greater than that 
of accustoming them to comforts which their after-lives can 
rarely supply ; and in drawing the difficult line as to just 
what amount of privation will develop hardiness and what 
will stunt it, the trustees believe that their present standard 
does not err on the side of luxury. The children perhaps 
are scarcely aware that new comforts have been given them ; 
but the superintendent notes in his little wards an added 
energy and robustness of constitution. 

As regards health, there are but three deaths and few cases 
of illness to report. There are of course the usual number 
of cripples and chronic cases, sufferers whose troubles can 
be alleviated but not cured. For these the constant care of 
the resident physician, Dr. C. L. Haynes, is valuable ; and 
still more so is her immediate attention to casual maladies in 
their beginnings, by which many cases of serious illness must 
have been averted. Never before, we believe, have there 
been so few sore eyes * or such other troubles among the 
children. 

The crying defect of the institution is the old one ; viz., 
that the nature of the buildings necessitates its organization 
on the congregate instead of on the family plan. For this 
there can be no remedy while the school remains in its pres- 
ent quarters. The trustees last year suggested the propriety 
of building one cottage for the girls ; but, after careful con- 
sideration, they abandoned the plan. From an examination 

* To prevent contagion from sore eyes, the pegs in the lavatories are numbered t 
and the towels marked with corresponding numbers ; this reduces the chance of the 
children using each other's towels. 



8 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

of the lists of girls and of the opportunities for placing them 
in families, it became evident that the majority who could 
not be so placed were below par in mental or physical condi- 
tion ; and for such the proposed outlay would scarcely be 
justified. The wiser way, the trustees decided, would be to 
place out every child who could be placed, and for those 
remaining to make the school as good as it could be made in 
its present quarters. They therefore, as already stated, raised 
the standard of living and of education ; and they asked a 
boarding-out appropriation of $5,000, which sum they believed 
would enable all who were eligible to be boarded. This has, in 
fact, for this year, proved slightly more than sufficient, and 
there will be a small surplus to be returned to the treasury ; 
but the superintendent estimates that to maintain through 
the coming year all the children now at board, will cost the 
full $5,000 ; so the trustees will recommend that this appro- 
priation be not decreased. 

The per capita cost of the children in the school was $3.13. 
The appropriation was $50,000, the same as the year before. 
Five hundred dollars of the appropriation for current ex- 
penses was spent on the carpentry department ; and we 
recommend, therefore, as a better division for another year, 
that $17,500 be granted for salaries, and $32,500 for the 
current expenses, the total being as heretofore, $50,000. 
For a detailed statement of the expenses of the school, we 
refer to the report and the tables of the superintendent. 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 
WESTBOROUGH. 



Daring the year just ended, the work of the school has 
gone quietly and successfully forward, under the superintend- 
ence of Mr. T. F. Chapin, who brings to this work not 
only the trained mind of an experienced teacher, but also a 
large measure of common sense and practical ability, 
united with tact, patience and faith in the possibilities of 
the work. 

The discipline of the school has been easily maintained, 
and is on the whole very satisfactory. The educational 
work has greatly improved. New teachers have replaced 
some who were unfitted for this kind of work. New 
methods have been adopted ; object teaching, drawing, clay 
modelling, etc., introduced, resulting in a general awaken- 
ing that is full of promise. Manual training, upon a mod- 
ification of the Swedish system, under a thoroughly compe- 
tent teacher, has been recently commenced. In addition, 
military drill for all the boys has been introduced, which 
not only interests them, but aids in securing prompt and 
cheerful obedience to commands, not only on the drill 
ground, but elsewhere ; to say nothing of cultivating that 
erect, alert, manly bearing so desirable. 

In all work of reform which looks to a radical change of 
moral character and to any considerable intellectual awaken- 
ing, the element of time necessarily enters. Most of the 
Lyman School boys have not simply been committed for 
trifling offences, but are children who by birth and breeding 
have been cast upon a stream of evil tendencies that threatens 



10 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

to lead them utterly away from all that is pure, true and 
noble. For instance, 198 of the inmates had been arrested 
before coming to the Lyman School, 74 had previously been 
inmates of other institutions, and 140 had one or both 
parents intemperate. It cannot reasonably be expected that 
boys with such an inheritance will in a few brief months 
become so fixed in better thinking and living that there 
shall be assurance of permanent reform. In the nature 
of the case, there must be time to arouse and educate the 
dormant conscience ; time to curb the unbridled passions ; 
time to awaken the mind and to set its faculties in order ; 
time to acquire habits of application, industry and per- 
severance ; time to bring to bear those kindly, helpful 
influences lacking hitherto, that shall crystallize in healthy 
moral character. Few of them during the last four years 
have stayed in the school for more than thirteen months. 
The trustees believe that, as a rule, they should be kept in 
longer ; for it is impossible to secure the best results in so 
short a time. On account of the crowded condition of the 
school, the trustees have been compelled to push boys out 
into places before they were prepared to go, and in many 
cases where there was little hope of permanent reform ; and 
the results have largely justified their fears. 

In addition to the family house provided by the purchase 
and enlargement of the Wilson place, the trustees last year 
asked for an appropriation for another family house. It is 
greatly to be regretted that the Legislature failed to grant 
such appropriation. The house asked for is needed for im- 
mediate use, the present quarters being full to overflowing. 
The coming three months are those when, of all the year, 
the largest number of boys are committed, and fewest can be 
placed out. The work of the school will be seriously hin- 
dered by such over-crowding, and the best results are im- 
possible. It now seems certain that two new family houses 
will be imperatively needed before the close of the coming 
year. 

There have been in the school a total of 296 inmates, the 
average number being 168.23, which is 41 larger than 
the year previous. There were — 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 11 

In the school Sept, 30, 1888, 142 

New commitments, 124 

Re-commitments. 5 

Returned, 25 

Total in the school during the year, 296 

The disposition of these boys was as follows : — 

In the school Sept. 30, 1889, . . . . ' . . . .184 

Released on probation to parents, 50 

Released on probation to others, 43 

Discharged, 6 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, ..... 3 

Ran away (all returned) , 10 

Total, 296 

The appropriation for the year was $37,300, of which 
$15,000 was for salaries ; and the per capita cost was $4.26. 
To obtain the true cost, however, allowance should be made 
for the special expenditure of $3,025.53 which the trustees 
were forced to take from the current appropriation for alter- 
ing and furnishing the new family house, and for the $742.57 
returned by the school to the treasury ; deducting these 
items reduces the per capita cost to $3.83. 

The trustees are glad to note a decrease of late in the 
number of boys returned to the school, and believe it to be 
owing in part, at least, to the more frequent visitation by 
officers of the State Board. 

The health of the boys has been excellent, no death occur- 
ring during the year. 

For further information we refer to the report and the 
tables of the superintendent. 



12 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



STATE IXDUSTEIAL SCHOOL FOE GIELS. 

LANCASTER. 



At the Industrial School at Lancaster the State is at- 
tempting the difficult task of guiding to an honest and 
industrious womanhood wilful girls who are in danger of 
falling into evil ways, and those who have already lost 
character. 

The average number of inmates during the year closing 
Sept. 30, 1889, has been 78.6, and the per capita cost 
$4.71. This high rate is, however, apparent rather than 
real ; for the expense of the school might fairly be reckoned 
to cover the care of the whole 297 girls under its charge, 
most of whom are out on probation, either in their own 
homes or more often at service in country households. 
For all commitments are for minority, and the girls who 
are outside are as truly a part of the school as are those 
upon the grounds. Many of them are in constant corre- 
spondence with the superintendent or the other officers, 
and all are under supervision, and are liable to return for 
change of place, for sickness, or for bad conduct. This 
practice of providing an outfit, and sending a girl away 
to earn her own living as soon as her work becomes of 
value, however it may raise the per capita rate, must in 
effect reduce the total appropriation. For instance, in the 
year 1876, with 53 new commitments to the school, the 
average number of inmates was 121.3, and the cost $25,980 ; 
now we report 73 commitments, yet an average of only 78.6 
in the school, and an appropriation of $18,500. 

The Industrial School is well equipped for the work it has 
in hand. It is organized upon what is called the "family 
system;" i. e., with separate houses, holding about twenty- 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 13 

five girls each. This allows them to be carefully classified 
according to their moral condition ; and, as no association is 
allowed the inmates of the several families, the danger of 
contaminating the more innocent by criminal association — 
a danger inherent in any reformatory conducted upon the 
congregate plan — is reduced to a minimum. Each of our 
four families has its own matron, housekeeper and teacher; 
and this allows a close intercourse between the girls and the 
officers, which is an element of great value. 

Another of the school's advantages is its situation upon a 
farm, whose broad acres afford ample opportunity for out-of- 
door life and occupation. All through the summer relays 
of girls are taken out for work upon the grounds ; and the 
novel labors of raking, planting, weeding, etc., give variety 
to the routine of their usual work, and help to rouse new 
interests and ambitions. The morbid cravings of those 
whose lives have too often been passed in the dark haunts of 
the city may be dispelled by the enjoyment of out-of-door 
life and the excitement of healthy work ; and the glowing 
faces that greet one in a band of these girl laborers allows 
one to hope that they have been cultivating something more 
valuable than crops. 

Work, however, is not the only educator relied on ; and 
four hours in the school-room every day give opportunity 
for instruction in the common branches and in singing, and 
help to implant habits of mental activity. 

But it is on the household industries, on sewing, knitting, 
scrubbing, laundry work and cooking, that the chief empha- 
sis is laid. There is constant rotation in the division of 
labor, no girl being employed for more than three months in 
any one department ; for the aim is, not simply to get the work 
done, but to send out from the school girls trained to skill in 
all kinds of housework. Labor-saving machines are avoided, 
that the girls may learn to contend with the lack of con- 
veniences which they will surely encounter in the plain house- 
holds where their labor will be in demand. With this end 
always in view, the matrons have been encouraged to incite 
their pupils to practise the household arts of painting, white- 
washing, papering, upholstering, repairing carpets, and even 
simple carpentry ; and our graduates have sometimes writ- 



14 PKIMAEY AND KEFOEM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

ten from their places to tell how, in the house-cleaning 
season, they were oiling floors and painting furniture, to the 
surprise and delight of their mistresses. Indeed, there could 
be no greater proof of the efficiency of their training than 
in the fact that the demand for their labor exceeds the sup- 
ply. The superintendent is able to pick and choose among 
the applications, taking pains to fit the right girl into the 
right place. This is doubtless one cause of the small num- 
ber of returns now made to the school ; but a still more 
potent cause of this decrease is the efficiency of the officers 
of the State Board of Lunacy and Charity, who have charge 
of our wards on their probation. Many a girl who leaves 
her place is sent up to the State House, and from there 
assigned a new place, without any return to the school. 
Moreover, the visitor-at-large, Miss Mary S. Beale, has 
proved an invaluable assistant, doing many things which 
were previously left undone, and supplementing in a thou- 
sand ways the work of the auxiliary visitors. Of the 87 
girls now in the institution, only 4 had been returned from 
places. 

The regular care of the outside girls is, however, now, as 
heretofore, intrusted to the auxiliary visitors, — women resi- 
dent in various parts of the State, who, as volunteers, assist 
the State Board in the supervision of its wards. Each appli- 
cation for a girl is referred for investigation and approval to 
the visitor of that neighborhood ; and, when placed, the 
girl is subject to her visitation. This means, as a rule, a 
really close relation between the two. The girl, fresh from 
the cheerful companionship and warm personal influences of 
the school, is apt to find herself lonely in her position of 
"help" in a country household, and eagerly welcomes the 
kindly interest of the visitor, who is often able to guide her 
in the choice of friends, to advise her in spending her wages, 
to enforce the rule that one-quarter of them shall be saved ;* 
and, if need be, to protect her interests with the employer, 
who may be disposed to forget that young girls at service, 
like all the rest of the world, are in need of innocent recre- 
ation. The trustees believe that the objection usually urged 

* Last year $881 was deposited with the treasurer by the girls, to be kept for 
them till their majority. 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 15 

against the supervision of prisoners on their ticket-of-leave 
does not apply to their wards ; for little stigma attaches to a 
" Lancaster girl." These, their status being known, are 
often able to win a good position in the community ; and it 
frequently happens that a new applicant will say that a neigh- 
bor has one of our girls, and "can another such be ob- 
tained ?" This good fame is of course not universal ; and in 
some neighborhoods, where a girl has disgraced herself and 
the school, a newcomer might find herself at a disadvantage. 
This period of probation under supervision the trustees con- 
sider an indispensable feature in their work of reform ; for, 
without some such half-way stage between the restraint of 
an institution and the license of their own homes, the most 
careful training would too often be brought to naught. 

All commitments to the Industrial School must be made 
by court, either on complaint of the parents or guardians or 
of an officer. "Stubbornness" is the offence for which 
parents and guardians usually bring a child before the 
court. At the trial, the interests of all juvenile offenders 
are protected by an agent of the State Board ; and, to secure 
a commitment, the complainant must show that the child's 
" stubbornness " is in danger of leading to worse. Lancaster 
is an Industrial School, not a penal institution, and it is 
the child's welfare that should govern the action of the court. 
Obviously, for a girl's own sake, she should be arrested in 
the first stages of a downward career, and not left to run 
wild until she becomes a public nuisance. It frequently 
happens that persons knowing the school and the good work 
it is doing are instrumental in recruiting its ranks ; for 
instance, a clergyman lately visited the institution, and soon 
after came two children, sent there by his advice. Of the 
73 new commitments this year, 42 were on complaint of 
parents or guardians. The increased number of commit- 
ments, larger this year than since 1856, may not seem to 
be a cause of congratulation ; but we believe it to be due 
to the fact that the work, not only as curative but as pre- 
ventive, is commending itself to the good opinion of the 
public ; and, when we all know of the many young girls in 
our community who are on the threshold of a life of vice, 
we must rejoice for every one who is snatched away. 



16 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Not that the Industrial School can claim that all its girls 
are restored to virtue. Far from it. Mauy who come to it 
are of such weak and shiftless character that they can never 
be virtuous except when warded from temptation ; others, 
with better possibilities, fail when the trial comes ; and a 
few seem ineradicably bent on evil. On the other hand, 
many unpromising girls develop unexpected virtues. The 
following table will tell, as well as figures can, what is the 
present condition of the 297 girls under the care of the 
Industrial School during the year. There were — 



In school Sept. 30, 1888, 

Returned to the school from former years 1 placing, 
ISTew commitments, ....... 

Total in the school during the year, . 



63 

28 
73 
— 164 



The following disposition was made of these girls : — 

In the school Sept. 30, 1889, ...... 87 

In place, 54 

With friends, 9 

Married, 2 

Almshouse, 5 

Reformatory Prison, 1 

Discharged, 6 

Total, — 



164 



There have been placed out during the year* 



79 



There have been returned to the school (including the 28 
from former years' placing), — 

For illness, 6 

change of place, 6 

unsatisfactory conduct, 15 

theft, 2 

serious immorality, . 3 

returned from elopement from place, ... .5 

transferred from Reformatory Prison, ... 2 

Total returned to the school, — 



* Of the 79 sent out from tbe school during the year, there were placed out 

once, 64 

There were placed out twice, 14 

There were placed out three times, 1 



79 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



17 



Total in custody Sept. 30, 1888, 

Committed this year, 

Total in custody during the year {including the 164 
already accounted for) , 

Of whom there have attained their majority, . 

Discharged by vote for good conduct, 

" " as nearly twenty-one years of age, 

" " as unfit subjects for the school, 

" " as defective in intellect, . 



Died, 



Total who have become of age, been discharged or died, 



At work in families, 
At work elsewhere, .... 
On probation with friends, 
Married in former years, not yet twenty 
Married this year, .... 
Total self-supporting, . 



one, 



In the school Sept. 30, 1889 
In Almshouse, . 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison in former year 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison this year, 
Total still supported at cost of State 



Ran away from place in former years, not yet reco 
Ran away from place this year, not yet recovered, 



recovered, 



Total still in care of trustees, 



225 
73 

298 

23 
4 
2 
5 
1 
2 

— 37 

97 

1 
24 
22 

9 

— 153 

87 
5 
4 
1 

— 97 

8 
3 

— 11 
. 261 



The feeble-minded girls still constitute a most perplexing 
element in the school. Some of them the trustees have 
discharged as " unfit subjects;" for the training is too 
expensive to give to those whom it cannot permanently 
benefit. But girls who are unfit for the school are still 
more unfit to be turned loose to pollute the community and 
to propagate a tainted offspring ; and the trustees earnestly 
renew their recommendations that a custodial asylum, like 
that in the State of New York, be established, where these 
unfortunates may be decently and economically cared for. 
Such a provision would prevent evils that no efforts, later, 
can cure. 

With the special appropriation of $2,500 a barn has been 
built ; the money was not quite enough, and to finish it and 
to repair the dilapidated building known as the Stewart 
barn, a further appropriation of $500 will be asked. In 



18 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

the current expenses, the increase in the numbers has made 
it difficult to make two ends meet ; and for the coming year 
a somewhat larger appropriation will be necessary. 

Kespectfully submitted by the Trustees, 

M. H. WALKER, Westborough, President. 
CHARLES L. GARDNER, Palmer, Treasurer. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS, Boston, Secretary. . t 
ELIZABETH C. PUTNAM, Boston. 
HENRY C. GREELEY, Clinton. 
MILO HILDRETH, Northborough. 
M. J. SULLIVAN, Chicopee. 
Sept. 30, 1889. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



19 



TKUST FUNDS OF LYMAN SCHOOL. 



TREASURER'S ACCOUNT. 



Lyman Fund. 

Charles L. Gardner, Treasurer, in account with Income of Lyman 

Fund. 

Dr. 

Amount received from Samuel K. Hey wood, Treas., 

Interest note, town of Marlborough, 

Dividend Citizens' National Bank, 

Amount borrowed from Palmer Savings Bank for 

Wilson farm, .... 
Interest note, town of Northborough, 
State tax from tax commissioner on account of 

bank stock, 

Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., . 

Interest on Boston & Albany R. R. bonds, 
Interest on Old Colony R. R. bond, 
Interest on Worcester Street R. R. bonds, 
Proceeds Boston & Albany bonds sold, 
Interest note, town of Marlborough, 
Dividend Citizens' National Bank, 
Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., . 
Interest note, town of Northborough, 
Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., . 
Interest Old Colony R. R. bond, . 
Interest Worcester Street R. R. bonds, 
Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., . 
Interest note, town of Marlborough, 
Dividend Citizens' National Bank, 
Interest on deposits Palmer National Bank, . 
State Treasurer, appropriation for Wilson farm, 



A»S 


9. 


Oct. 


1. 




1. 




1. 




18. 


Nov. 


1. 


Dec. 


29. 




31. 


1889. 


Feb. 


1. 




18. 




18. 


March 8. 


April 


1. 




1. 




1. 


May 


1. 


July 


1. 


Aug. 


1. 




1. 


Sept. 


30. 




30. 




30. 




30. 




30. 



1888. 

Oct. 17. 

17. 
19. 



Paid by Order of Trustees. 
Cr. 
T. F. Chapin, superintendent, type bill, 
Robert P. Fernald, board of clerk, 
Geo. B. Wilson, for Wilson farm, . 

Carried 'forward, . 



$1,811 13 


206 


25 


100 00 


3,500 00 


30 00 


77 


29 


228 


00 


70 


00 


30 


00 


100 


00 


2,186 50 


206 


25 


100 


00 


228 


00 


30 


00 


228 


oa 


30 00 


100 


00 


228 


00 


206 


25 


100 00 


28 


00 


5,500 00 


$15,323 67 


$35 


28 


34 


00 


5,500 00 


$5,569 


28 



20 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Nov. 


9. 


Dec. 


17. 




24. 




24. 




29. 


1889. 


Jan. 


23. 


Feb. 


23. 




23. 




23. 




23. 




23. 




23. 




23. 




23. 




23. 




23. 




23. 




23. 




23. 



23. 

23. 
23. 
23. 
23. 
23. 

23. 

23. 

23. 
March 8. 

11. 
April 13. 
May 18. 

18. 

18. 

June 15. 
24. 
24. 
24. 

6. 

6. 

6. 

5. 



July 



Aug. 



Brought forward, 

H. J. Skillings enlistment, Jno. D. Fox, 
Palmer Savings Bank, interest on loan, 
T. F. Chapin, superintendent, Christmas enter 

tainment, . . . . . 
Geo. B. Wilson, insurance policy, 
Horace Hobbs, examining title Wilson farm, 

John H. Cummings, George enlistment, 
C. Whiting & Co., Lyman Hall repairs, 
C. A. Harrington, " " " 

Geo. W. Knapp, " " " 

H. L. Adams, " " " 

Walcott Brown, " " " 

C. B. Walls & Co., 
Wm. J. Cunningham, " " " 

F. E. Allen, 

Jno. A. Brown, " " " 

Eli Sawyer, " " • " 

William Wilson, " " " 

Jno. Brown, " " " 

Frank S. Robbins, superintendent's house re 

pairs, 

Geo. H. Woodman & Co., superintendent's house 

repairs, 

Jno. A. Brown, superintendent's house repairs, 
Eli Sawyer, superintendent's house repairs, . 
L. A. Jordan, superintendent's house repairs, 
Geo. E. Jordan, superintendent's house repairs, 
J. W. Clark for Chas. Woodman, superintend 

ent's house repairs, 

G. A. McKendy, superintendent's house repairs 
Mrs. P. J. Stone, superintendent's house repairs, 
C. B. Frost & Co., superintendent's house repairs, 
C. B. Frost & Co., seats, 
Mrs. Abbie Harvey, lessons in music, . 
Lizzie M. Sanborn, lessons in drawing, 
Lizzie M. Sanborn, lessons in drawing, 
Tabor Organ Co., organ, 
T. F. Chapin, superintendent, address in chapel 

and piano concerts, .... 
Palmer Savings Bank, interest on loan, 
Lizzie M. Sanborn, lessons in drawing, 
Mary L. Pettit, supervising teachers, . 
W. C. Ireland & Co., safe, 
Lizzie M. Sanborn, lessons in drawing, 
Mary L. Pettit, supervision and music, 
Masten & Wells, fireworks, . 
T, F. Chapin, superintendent, extra services 

ters, •••••.• 

Carried forward, .... 



mas 



$5,569 


28 


12 


16 


20 90 


50 00 


13 


76 


5 


00 


12 


16 


169 


61 


165 


25 


77 45 


97 37 


99 


50 


30 00 


26 


12 


20 


85 


9 


50 


28 


50 


16 


G2 


11 


87 



259 20 



22 


44 


54 


62 


52 


25 


41 


00 


34 


75 


31 


00 


20 


90 


12 00 


2 55 


27 50 


13 


26 


35 52 


31 08 


45 


00 



16 00 

87 50 

35 52 

41 66 

110 00 

35 52 

41 67 

25 00 

150 00 



$7,761 84 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



21 



Brought forward, .... 

Sept. 4. Mary L. Pettit, supervision and music, 

30. Palmer Savings Bank, amount of loan, . 

30. Palmer Savings Bank, interest on loan, 

30. Balance forward, 



£7,761 84 
83 33 

3,500 00 
60 28 

3,918 22 



CHARLES L. 



$15,323 67 
GARDNER, 

Treasurer. 



Sept. 30, 1889. 
Examined and approved 



M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 



Mary Lamb Fund, Lyman School. 

Charles L. Gardner, Treasurer, in account with Income of Mary 

Lamb Fund. 



1888. 


Dr. 




Oct. 1. 


Amount received from Samuel R. Heywood, 






treasurer, 


$71 93 


Dec. 31. 


Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., . 


10 00 


1889. 

April 1. 
July 1. 

Sept. 30. 


Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., . 
Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., . 
Dividend Boston & Albany R. R., . 

Cr. 


10 00 
10 00 
10 00 


1889. 


$111 93 


Sept. 30. 


Balance forward, 


$111 93 




CHARLES L. GARDNER, 


Sept. 30, 1889. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 


Treasurer. 



Inventory of Lyman School Investments 

114 shares Boston & Albany R. R. stock, . 

92 shares Fitchburg R. R. stock, 

40 shares Citizens' National Bank, 

One $1,000 6 per cent. Old Colony R. R. bond, . 

Four Worcester Street Railway bonds, 5 per 

cent., 

Note town of Northborough, .... 
Note town of Marlborough, .... 
Cash in Palmer National Bank, .... 

Mary Lamb Fund. 

Five shares Boston & Albany R. R. stock, 
Deposit in People's Savings Bank, . 



ts, Lyman Fund. 


Par value. 


Market value. 


$11,400 00 


$24,510 00 


9,200 00 


6,256 00 


4,000 00 


4,800 00 


1,000 00 


1,180 00 


4,000 00 


4,000 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


10,000 00 


10,000 00 


4,133 07 


4,133 07 


Par value. 


Market value. 


$500 00 


$1,075 00 


473 55 


473 55 


,ES L. GARDNER, 




Treasurer. 



Sept. 30, 1889. 
Examined and approved: 



M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 



22 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



TRUST FUNDS STATE INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL. 



Charles L. Gardner, Treasurer, in account with Mary Lamb Fund. 

1888. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Amount received from Samuel R. Heywood, 
treasurer, . . . . 
12. Dividend Boston National Bank, .... 
Dec. 29. State tax refunded on bank stock, 

1889. 

April 1. Dividend Boston National Bank, .... 



1888. Cr. 
Dec. 14. Mrs. L. L. Brackett, superintendent, Christmas 
entertainment, 

1889. 

April 13. J. P. Leahy, deposition Mary C. "Watson, 

July 6. Mrs. L. L. Brackett, superintendent, Fourth of 

July celebration, 

Aug. 5. Aaron Hill, dental work for Rose Noble, 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, 



Sept. 30, 1889. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDBETH. 



$77 40 


39 00 


20 52 


39 00 


5175 92 


$25 00 


10 00 


20 00 


18 00 


102 92 



$175 92 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 23 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL TRUST FUND. 



Charles L. Gardner, Treasurer, in account with Industrial School 

Trust Fund. 

Fay Fund. 

1889. Dr. 

Sept. 30. Interest from Chelsea Savings Bank, 8 . . $40 40 



Paid by Order^of Trustees. 

1889. Cr. 

Sept. 30. For highest grade deportment, to eight girls, 

$5.05 each, $40 40 

CHARLES L. GARDNER, 

Treasurer, 
Sept. 30, 1889. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 



Inventory of Industrial School Investments, Mary Lamb Fund. 

1889. Par value. Market value. 

Sept. 30. 13 shares Boston National Bank, . $1,300 00 $1,610 00 



Fay Fund. 

1889. 

Sept. 30. Deposit in Chelsea Savings Bank, . . . $1,000 00 



Rogers Fund. 

1889. 

Sept. 30. One State of Maine 6 per cent, bond, in custody of 

State Treasurer, $1,000 00 

CHARLES L. GARDNER, 

Treasurer. 
Sept. 30, 1889. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 



24 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct.'89. 

1889. 

Sept. 30. Cash received from superintendent for deposit to 
credit of sundry girls, from Oct. 25, 1888, to 
Sept. 24, 1889, $881 80 

By deposits in savings banks on account of sun- 
dry girls, 881 80 

Cash drawn from savings banks on account of 
sundry girls, from Oct. 25, 1888, to Sept. 28, 
1889, 1,009 87 

By paid sundry amounts drawn from savings 
banks, 1,009 87 



Memorandum of Savings Deposits for Girls. 

1889. 

Sept. 30. 79 depositors in Westborough Savings Bank. 
60 depositors in Palmer Savings Bank. 
26 depositors in Boston Five Cents Savings Bank. 

2 depositors in People's Savings Bank. 

3 depositors in Clinton Savings Bank. 

CHARLES L. GARDNER, 

Treasurer. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL 



MONSON. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

The work in the State Primary School for the year ending 
Sept. 30, 1889, is finished. Its general plan has been about 
the same as in previous years. We have not accomplished 
as much in some directions as we had hoped to accomplish, 
but in others our expectations are fully realized. We are 
not discouraged because of our failures, nor, we hope, unduly 
elated because of our successes. 

There were in the institution at the beginning of the year 
314 persons, as inmates or pupils. Add to this 260, the 
number admitted during the year, and we have an apparent 
total of 574 as the number who have received the care of 
the school wholly or in part for the year. Of this number, 
however, 31 have been returned to the school who were 
placed out during the year, so that the actual number cared 
for is. 543. The least number present at any given time 
during the year was 281. The greatest number was 343, 
which is the present number. Average, 314. At present 
there are 234 boys, 94 girls and 15 women. There were 
placed out on trial or on board during the year 187. The 
number discharged has been 31, while 9 have been removed 
to other institutions and 3 have died. The total amount 
expended for salaries and current expenses during the year 
is $51,195.74. There are now 43 children on board in 
families in different parts of the State. It will be seen, by 
referring to statement " L," that the weekly per capita cost 
for these children is $1.88. Clothing, only, has been fur- 
nished for two of them ; so that the actual number for whom 
board is paid is 41. Without considering these two and 
their expenses, the weekly per capita cost is $1.94. The 
total expenses of this department have been $4,009.41, of 
which a small amount was for medical attendance. 



28 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

The general health of the children in the school has been 
good, and the death rate small. When it is considered that 
these children have come here from the poorer homes in 
the State, and that many of them are the children of dis- 
eased and intemperate parents, the wonder is that so few 
of them are sick. I attribute this general healthful con- 
dition to regularity ; to a good, wholesome and simple diet ; 
and general good care from officers, nurses and physician. 
For a more particular statement concerning the health of 
the children, I refer you to the report of the resident phy- 
sician. 

Most of the children who come here have a very limited 
education, except such as is gained on the streets or in 
haunts of wickedness. Their morals and ambitions are low, 
their mental horizon is narrow, and they are too often con- 
tent to plod along in about the same ruts as their ancestors. 
The aim of the school is to broaden their education, to lift 
them up in the moral world, to instil into their minds loftier 
ambitions, and to make them contented only when they 
have done their best. To accomplish this all have labored 
earnestly, thinking of what was best for the child, and try- 
ing to bring it up to the best. Since the capital with which 
these children are to work is their hands, these need edu- 
cating as well as their minds. The thinking ought to be 
visible at their fingers' ends. They will not show, in the 
future, what the State has done for them, so much by their 
ability to think out great problems, as by their ability to 
intelligently and skilfully do the work that their hands find 
to do. Thus it becomes important that some system of 
manual training should be adopted. To this end, with your 
sanction, I have broken the course of study that was laid out 
in 1888, that some work might be done in this direction. 
The work of the kindergarten has been carried into the 
primary classes to a limited extent, as a preparation for 
more advanced work. Lessons in paper folding and cutting, 
so as to fix the geometrical forms in the minds of the children, 
have been given to about one-half of them. More attention 
has been given to drawing, and about fifty children have 
received instruction in clay working. This is to be con- 
tinued, so that some of the simpler work in clay moulding 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 29 

will be undertaken by the more advanced girls. So far as 
the boys will receive instruction in clay working, it is for 
the purpose of learning how to make something previous to 
their entry to the workroom in which carpenters' tools are 
used. In this workroom I have placed sixteen benches, all 
of which are provided with proper tools for the use of the 
boys, costing about $15.50 each, including the bench. The 
boys from the two most advanced classes, regardless of age, 
have been receiving instruction in this line since May. The 
lessons do not exceed ninety minutes in length, and no 
child has more than one lesson a week. I am very much 
gratified with the interest manifested in all of these exercises 
by both pupils and teachers. The course intended to be 
followed in manual training has not been definitely pre- 
scribed as yet, but. the work done is in the line of the 
intended course. The regular work in the schools has not 
been materially lessened, and good progress has been made. 
Teachers have been faithful and untiring in their efforts to 
have improvement clearly shown from month to month. 
For more statistical information concerning the schools, I 
refer you to the report of the principal. In other ways than 
that indicated above, of which more particular mention was 
made in the last annual report, industrial training has been 
carried on. The children have been employed in doing the 
necessary work in and about the buildings, and on the farm. 
While a few of them are very inefficient, a large majority are 
willing workers, and accomplish a great deal. A reference 
to the tabular statement forming a part of this report, and 
denoted " K," shows how many are now employed in the 
regular work of the institution. 

The change in the school work necessitated changes in 
the school-rooms. The most available rooms for the boys' 
workroom and for the clay working were those occupied by 
the kindergarten and the room adjoining. These two rooms 
were taken for that purpose. The room over the office and 
girls' sewing-room was made into two school-rooms, and 
they have been used as such since the beginning of the 
summer term. The children who had occupied this room 
for a sleeping-room were transferred to another part of the 
building. 



30 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Such changes and repairs as were in progress at the hos- 
pital a year ago were completed in due season ; and, while 
the expenses were greater than at first contemplated, they 
have all been met from the regular appropriation, and no 
other department has suffered thereby. The bills for this 
expenditure are embraced in the term, "extraordinary re- 
pairs," in statement " E." I consider the general plan and 
arrangements much better than heretofore, and believe the 
sanitary arrangements have been much improved. 

During the months of July and August the main buildings 
received one coat of paint. This was put on at an expense 
of about $550. Other repairs such as were necessary have 
been made from time to time, the horse barn and out-buildings 
receiving considerable attention. Several rods of new stone 
wall for fences have been laid, old walls have been repaired 
where the need was imperative, drains have been taken up 
and relaid, and the general condition of the premises is 
favorable for the fall and winter. 

Under a Resolve passed by the last Legislature, and 
approved May 9, appropriating a sum not exceeding $4,000 
to be expended for new boilers, a contract was made with 
Mr. D. F. Coghlan of Holyoke for three new locomotive 
tubular boilers, to be made of the best quality of Otis steel. 
Workmen are now engaged in putting in these boilers, and 
I am satisfied that in making them the terms of the contract 
have been honorably met. 

The farm crops for the year are good. The crop of hay 
was in excess of that of former years, but, on account of 
the wet weather, was not put into the barns in as good con- 
dition as usual, though but a small portion of it was badly 
injured. The silo was filled from corn grown on about six 
acres of ground. The potato crop is a light one, but there 
is an abundance of other vegetables. The summary of the 
farm account for the year forms a part of this report, and is 
designated as statement " Q." 

The southerly reservoir belonging to the school was built 
in 1859. Its capacity was much too small, and in 1876 it 
was enlarged so that its capacity was increased to 385,000 
gallons. Its westerly bank is leaky, consequently the res- 
ervoir is almost never full. The water is stored almost 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 31 

exclusively for fire purposes, only a very small amount 
being drawn for daily use. During the warm weather the 
water is much better than that in the westerly reservoir. 
This may be accounted for in two ways. The springs which 
feed in part the westerly reservoir cease to flow earlier, in a 
dry season, than those which feed the southerly reservoir. 
The situation of the westerly reservoir is such that much 
more vegetable matter is taken in for decay than in the 
southerly one. It would be better if the water used in 
the institution could be drawn chiefly from the supply at 
the south. This cannot be done, and retain enough for 
safety in the event of a fire. I am in favor of making such 
repairs and alterations on the westerly bank as will be 
necessary to prevent the wasting away of so much water, 
and draw our daily supply, so far as we can, from this point. 
No additional appropriation to the regular one will be needed 
to carry out this suggestion. 

The coal shed built in 1877 by the side of the New Lon- 
don & Northern Railroad is in need of repairs. The floor 
is almost worthless, while the covering, except the roof, is 
very much broken. The shed is by the side of the main 
track, and coal has to be unloaded from the cars at such times 
as the track is not needed for the running of trains. The 
process of unloading is a slow one, as the coal cars have to 
be moved for every passing train. About a year ago the 
road bed was raised to such a height as to make the unload- 
ing more difficult than it had been. In view of these things, 
I think it would be well to petition the railroad company to 
put in a spur track, and remove the old shed from its pres- 
ent position to a place by the side of the spur track, if one 
should be built. The road to the shed in its present posi- 
tion is a difficult road over which to draw so much coal. If 
the shed could be moved southerly several rods, near the 
main highway, by a spur track, the unloading and the draw- 
ing of the coal could be accomplished much easier and at 
much less expense. There is a triangular piece of land be- 
longing to Mrs. G. H. Fay, bounded by the railroad, by the 
highway, and land belonging to the State, containing about 
three acres. If the State owned this piece of land, and the 
coal shed could be placed upon it, as indicated above, many 



32 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

of the difficulties of unloading and drawing the coal would 
be removed. This land is for sale. I am convinced that it 
would be economy for the State to buy it at a reasonable 
price, and move the shed on it, near the highway. I re- 
spectfully ask your consideration of this matter. 

There is another triangular piece of land which comes 
within a few rods of our buildings, projecting into the farm 
about sixty rods on the northerly side, and containing fifteen 
acres or more, which is not the property of the State. On 
it at the present time are the ruins of an old sawmill ; a 
small one-tenement house, to which is attached a shed con- 
taining kettles, etc., for making soap; and an old house 
which has been uninhabited for several years. The fences 
on this tract are in a tumble-down condition, and the whole 
has the appearance of being very much neglected. Persons 
having communication with the institution must pass through 
this land, and, because of its nearness to the buildings here, 
must naturally conclude that it belongs to the State. Fortu- 
nately for the school, the soap factory has not been used as 
such for two or more years past ; but present indications 
seem to point to its early use as designed. Other buildings 
may be located on this land, and there is nothing to prevent 
the owners thereof from establishing soap factories or other 
factories equally objectionable. I think it proper, in order 
to prevent the multiplication of these nuisances almost at 
our very door, that this land should become the property of 
the State ; and I would like a special appropriation to be 
used in the purchase and improvement of it. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my thanks to the teachers 
and officers for their cordial co-operation in my plans, to all 
who have in any way contributed to the enjoyment and com- 
fort of the children, and to you for help and support in my 
official duties, and for the many expressions of personal 
kindness to me and mine. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Monson, Oct. 1, 1889. 



AMOS ANDREWS, 

Superintendent. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



33 



Statement A. — Summary of Admissions and Discharges. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



Women. 



Totals. 



Present Sept. 30, 1888, 

Received from State Almshouse at Tewks- 
bury,. 

Received from Superintendent Indoor Poor, 
as juvenile offenders, . . 

Received from Superintendent Indoor Poor, 
as neglected children, .... 

Received from Superintendent Indoor Poor, 
as dependent children, .... 

Received from Children's Hospital, . 

Returned, placed in previous years, . 

Returned, having been placed out since 
Sept. 30, 1888, 

Totals, 

Discharged by Board of Lunacy and 
Charity, 

Placed out on trial, . . . . . 

Removed to State Almshouse at Tewks- 
bury, . . . . . . . . 

Removed to Children's Hospital for treat- 
ment, ....... 

Removed to Massachusetts General Hos- 
pital for treatment, . . . 

Removed to Deaf and Dumb Asylum at 
Hartford, 

Boarded out in families, . . . . 

Died, 

Eloped and not returned, . . . . 

Totals, ....... 

Remaining Sept. 30, 1889, . 



234 

32 

32 

44 

4 

1 

32 

27 



406 



19 
136 

2 

1 



172 
234 



63 

21 

4 

31 

2 

1 
19 



145 



9 
28 



51 
94 



17 
6 



23 



314 

59 
36 

75 

6 

2 

51 

31 



574 

31 
164 

6 

1 

1 

1 

23 
3 



15 



231 
343 



34 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 



Statement B. 

Number of Children received from Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 
Juvenile Offenders. 

During year ending Sept. 30, 1885, 33 

" 30, 1886, . . . . .40 

" 30,1887, 34 

" 30, 1888, 48 

" 30, 1889, 36 

Average for 5 years, 38-f- 



Number of Children received from Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 

Neglected Children. 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1885, 27 



" 30, 1886, 
« 30,1887, 
" 30,1888, 
" 30,1889, 
Average for 5 years, 



32 
23 
21 
75 

35+ 



Number of Children received from Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 
Dependent Children. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1885, 29 

" 30,1886, 11 

" 30,1887, .9 

" 30,1888, . . . . . .' .' . 10 ■ 

" 30,1889, 6 

Average for 5 years, 13 

Number received from State Almshouse. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1885, 99 

" 30, 1886, 27 

" 30,1887, 76 

" 30, 1888, 48 

« 30, 1889, 59 

Average for 5 years, 61-f- 



Number of Children returned from Place, having been placed out in 

Previous Years. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1885, 49 

" 30,1886, . . . . . . . .47 

" 30, 1887, 46 

" 30, 1888, 45 

" 30,1889, . . . . '. .' ... . .51 

Average for 5 years, 47-}- 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



35 



Number of Children returned from Place, having been placed out in 

. Current Years. 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1885, 



" 30,1886, 
" 30, 1887, 
" 30, 1888, 
" 30, 1889, 
Average for 5 years, 



38 
34 
46 
43 



38+ 



Statement C. — Nativity of Inmates. 
The nativity of the 176 persons received during the year (not includ- 
ing those returned from places) is as follows : — 

Native born, . . 134 

Foreign born, 31 

Unknown 11 



Of the foreign born, there were born in — 



Canada, . 






2 


New Brunswick, 






3 


England, 






10 


Nova Scotia, .... 4 


Germany, 






3 


Prince Edward Island, . . 2 


Ireland, . 






4 


Scotland, .... 2 


Newfoundland, 






1 




Of those born in the United States, there were born in — 


Connecticut, .... 4 


New York, .... 6 


Missouri, 






1 


Rhode Island, ... 2 


Maine, . 






2 


Vermont, .... 2 


New Hampshire, 






1 


Virginia, .... 1 


New Jersey, . 






2 




Of those born in Massachusetts, there were born in — 


Acushnet, .... 3 


Holyoke, . % 


Amherst, 






2 


Lawrence^ 






5 


Andover, 






2 


Lee, 






1 


Ayer, . 






1 


Lowell, . 






5 


Boston, . 






9 


Lynn, . 






4 


Boxford, 






1 


Marlborough, 






1 


Bridgewater, . 






1 


Maynard, 






1 


Cambridge, . 






1 


Medford, 






2 


Canton, . 






1 


Milton, . 






1 


Chelsea, . 






2 


Newbury, 






1 


Dedham, 






1 


North Adams, 






2 


Fall River, . 






6 


Northampton, 






4 


Fitchburg, 






1 


Northborough, 






1 


Gloucester, . 






2 


North Hatfield, 






2 


Haverhill, 






1 


North Reading, 






1 



36 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Otis, 


4 


Taunton, 






1 


Oxford, . 


1 


Tewksbury, . 




1 


Palmer, . 


1 


Turner's Falls, 






1 


Paxton, . 


1 


Wakefield, . 






2 


Plymouth, 


1 


Waltham, 






1 


Salem, . 


2 


Webster, 






2 


Sanctysfield, . 


4 


Weston, . 






2 


She&eld, 


1 


Williamsburg, 






1 


South Hadley Falls, 


1 


Winchendon, . 






1 


Southbridge, . 


1 


Woburn, 






1 


Springfield, . 


. 11 


Worcester, 






2 


Stockbridge % » 


;"V t 3 





















Diagram 




- Showing 


3 


Movement of Population at State Primary School. 










OCTOBER. 


NOVEMBER. 


DECEMBER. 


JANUARY. 


FEBRUARY. 


MARCH. 


APRIL. 


MAY. 


JUNE. 


JULY. 


AUGUST. 


SEPTEMBER. 






























































































































































































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Shows movement for year ending September 30, 1887. 

SO, 1888. 
« « « « " " 30, 1889. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



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Superintendent, .... 

Engineer, ..... 

44 

Physician, 

Clerk, 

Baker, 

In charge of dining-hall, . 
Supervisor, 

44 

44 

Expressman, .... 
Matron, ..... 
Assistant matron, 


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Principal and teacher of first class, 

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" of third class, 

" of fourth class, 

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" of fifth class (music), . 

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Amos Andrews, . 
John N. Lacey, 
Joseph H. Kenerson 
C. L. Haynes, M.D., 
James J. Prentiss, 
Frank Duffy, . 
Elon G. Buss, . 
A. W. Mansur, 
Erwin G. Ward, 
John E. Taylor, 
John M. Sears, 
Edward E. Walker, 
J. M. Sisk, . 
Mrs. M. A. Andrews 
Miss A. Swinerton, 
Miss Etta J. Lent, 
Miss N. J. Rice, 
Miss Clara A. Lent, 
Miss Emma A. Moorj 
Miss E. M. Fullingtc 
Miss II. L. Lacey, 
Miss G. A. Cheney, 
Miss Kate L. Blenus, 
Miss E. E. Kenerson 
Mrs. S. E. Prentiss, 
Mrs. H. E. Darte, 


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1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 41 



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T— 1 -i—l i — i i — i i — ( i-l t— 1 i—l i— 1 i—l i-l tH r-l i-H 








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sventh class, . 

lergarten, 

lergarten, 

sewing, . 
tructor in sewi 

loress, 


dining-hall, 


k, ! !: 

indress, . 


U It 

Shoemaker, . 
Watchman, . 
Farmer, 
Gardener, . 

Teamster, . 


" of s 

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Nurse, . 

Instructor in 

Assistant ins 

Tailoress, 
Assistant tai 
Supervisor, . 

Substitute, 

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Miss Flora J. Dyer, 
Mrs. L. J. Blaisdell, 
Miss J. L. Clark, 
Miss F. A. Ramsay, . 
Mrs. A. A. Taylor, . 
Mrs. A. B. Payne, 
Mrs. S. E. Ward, 
Mrs. J. A. Buss, 
Miss Lilian E. Buss, 
Miss Clara A. Lent, 
Mrs. C. D. Clark, . 
Miss Carrie M. Blenus, 
Miss F. F. Caldwell, 
Miss Abbie C. Phelps, . 
Miss Tenah Porter, 
Miss Jennie E. Hayford, 
Miss L. E. Preston, . 
Miss Nettie L. Hollow ay, 
Mrs. M. J. Dickinson, . 


Mrs. Jane Julina, . 
Miss Louisa Tapley, 
Miss M. M. Lee, 
Mrs. E. J. Barnes, 
Mrs. C. D. Clark, . 
Mrs. Sarah Hunt, 
Samuel C. Rogers, . 
Wm. M. Watson, 
W. H. Williams, 
Edw. E. Walker, . 
Wm. A. Warren, 
Fred S. Barnes, . 
Chas. E. Allyn, . 


oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 
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42 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



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J. C. Rand,. 

Stanley C. Blenus, 
Harrison B. Ware, 
William Carey, 
N. C. Bushnell, . 
J. C. Band, . 
Marcus Sartwell, . 
B. B. Barrett, . 
Chas. E. Blake, . 
A. W. Barlow, . 
S. S. Nichols, . 
E. W. Upham, . 
Alvah H. Jenkins, 
Wm. A. Warren, . 
Ernest F. Shaw, 
James Skevington, 
Wm. A. Warren, . 
William Franklin, 
Charles Crippen, . 
Thomas J. Flynn, 
William Kelley, 
N. A. D. Wheeler, 


3 

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1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18 



43 





Statement G. — Products of the Farm 




1889. 


Quantity. 


Value, 


Apples, early, 


31i bushels, . 


$15 75 


" cider, 








375 


37 50 


" winter, 








150 barrels, . 


300 00 


Asparagus, . 








17 bushels, . 


34 00 


Beans, . 










67 


81 00 


Beef, 










11,040 pounds, . 


640 71 


Beets, 










145 bushels, . 


76 50 


Cabbage, 










6,000 heads, . 


486 50 


Carrots, . 










1,200 bushels, . 


600 00 


Celery, . 










2,000 bunches, . 


200 00 


Corn fodder, 










5^ tons, 


44 00 


Crab-apples, 










2f bushels, . 


2 75 


Cucumbers, 










241 


29 00 


Currants, 










84 quarts, . 


8 40 


Eggs, . 










425i§ dozens, . 


94 92 


Ensilage, 










125 tons, 


625 00 


Grapes, . 










2| bushels, . 


4 75 


Hay, 










175 tons, 


2,740 00 


Hayed oats, 










8 


80 00 


Ice, 










375 


562 50 


Indian corn, 










185 bushels, . 


138 75 


Lettuce, . 










52 


26 00 


Mangolds, 










1,800 


540 00 


Manure, . 










500 loads, 


500 00 


Milk, . 










142,848 quarts, . 


5,713 92 


Oats, 










125 bushels, . 


62 50 


Oat straw, 










4 tons, 


40 00 


Onions, . 










90 bushels, . 


67 50 


Pears, 










8| 


8 37 


Pease, . 










30 


60 00 


Plums, . 










| bushel, . 


175 00 


Peppers, 










i « 

2 " 


1 00 


Pop-corn, 










10 bushels, . 


15 00 


Potatoes, 










930 


645 00 


Parsnips, 










150 


67 50 


Poultry, . 










403 pounds, . 


80 60 


Pork, . 










8,149 


629 82 


Quinces, 










\ bushel, . 


50 


Radishes, 










50 bunches, . 


2 50 


Ruta-bagas, 










200 bushels, . 


60 00 


Rhubarb, 










1,200 pounds, . 


18 00 


Rowen, . 










22 tons, 


294 00 


Rye, . 










50 bushels, . 


37 50 


Rye straw, 










3 tons, 


45 00 


Raspberries, 










5 quarts, . 


60 


Strawberries, 










934 


112 08 


Spinach, 










55 bushels, . 


27 50 


Squash, summer, . 








21 


13 50 


" winter, 








2,500 pounds, . 


100 00 


Sweet corn, . 








120 bushels, . 


72 00 


Tomatoes, 










201 


17 68 


Turnips, 










750 


75 00 


Veal. . 










565 pounds, . 


56 50 


Wood, . 










25 cords, 


137 50 












$16,330 85 



U PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 



Statement H. — Work done in Sewing-room No. 1, 



ARTICLES. 


Made. 


Repaired. 


Total. 


Aprons, 


323 


90 


413 


Bed spreads, 










109 


12 


121 


Bed ticks, . 










1 


427 


428 


Bibs, . 










102 


_ 


102 


Braces, 










1 


1 


2 


Blankets, . 










_ 


5 


5 


Clothes bags, 










3 


- 


3 


Chemises, . 










84 


- 


84 


Curtains, . 










46 


„ 


46 


Coats, 










_ 


93 


93 


Carpets, 










- 


2 


2 


Dresses, 










264 


80 


344 


Drawers, 










781 


47 


828 


Dish cloths, 










16 


- 


16 


Eye shades, 










16 


_ 


16 


Flags, . 










- 


1 


1 


Hose, . 










- 


4,612 


4,612 


Night dresses, 










202 


- 


202 


Night shirts, 










44 


- 


44 


Names sewed on 










25 


- 


25 


Penwipers, 










60 


_ 


60 


Pillow cases, 










318 


136 


454 


Pants, . 










- 


48 


48 


Rugs, . 










- 


7 


7 


Sacks, . 










69 


57 


126 


Sheets, 










585 


292 


877 


Straps, 










1 


- 


1 


Shirts, 










_. 


1,486 


1,486 


Skirts, 










163 


- 


163 


Table napkins, 










143 


26 


169 


Table cloths, 










3 


32 


35 


Tea bags, . 










19 


- 


19 


Towels, 










1,038 


631 


1,669 


Waists, 










123 


1 


124 


Wash cloths, 










60 


- 


60 


Waist straps, 










26 


- 


26 


Total, . 








• 


4,625 


8,086 


12,711 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



45 



Statement I. — Work done in Sewing-room No. 2. 



ARTICLES. 


Made. 


Repaired. 


Total. 


Blouses, 
Caps, . 
Jackets, 

Kitchen aprons, . 
Mats, . 
Mittens, 
Pants, , 
Shirts, . 
Suspenders, 








264 

305 

21 

8 

2 

839 

428 

300 


131 

27 
1,575 

2,663 


131 

291 

1,880 

21 

8 

2 

3,502 

428 

300 










2,167 


4,396 


6,563 



Total number of articles made, 
" " " " repaired, 



6,792 
12,482 

19,274 



Statement J. 

Amos Andrews, Superintendent and Disbursing Officer of the State 

Primary School, in account with the State Treasurer. 

Dr. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1888, . . . — . . . $ 100 00 

received from appropriation for current expenses for 

1888, 11,674 34 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1888, 1,141 67 

received from appropriation for current expenses for 

1889, 39,521 40 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1889, 2,867 74 

received from appropriation for new boilers, . 9 22 

received from sales, ....... 138 00 

$55,452 37 
Cr. 

Disbursements for three months, ending Dec. 31, 1888, . $12,916 01 

Disbursements for nine months, ending Sept. 30, 1889, . 42,298 36 

Payments to State Treasurer, 138 00 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1889, 100 00 

$55,452 37 

[Note. — This institution has no " fund " from which to draw for any 
expenditure whatever. It derives its support wholly from the State 
treasury by annual legislative appropriations. 



46 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

The per capita cost for the year is f 3.13. This sum shows the cost of 
clothing, food and lodging, medical attendance, teaching and supervi- 
sion, — in brief, the entire expense of maintaining all the inmates of the 
institution, — together with all ordinary repairs, such as must constantly 
be made to keep the buildings and appliances in good condition; in- 
cluding also the cost of heating and lighting the buildings, and of fur- 
nishing an outfit for all pupils going away from the school, and their 
travelling expenses. 

Children placed out on trial are provided with two complete suits of 
clothing, with an overcoat extra in cold weather, the whole outfit costing 
on an average $16.00. 

The State appropriations are made for calendar years, while the 
reports of institutions are made for years ending Sept. 30. 

It will therefore readily be seen, that, while the expenditures are 
kept within the yearly appropriations, the expense for the institution 
year may be larger or smaller than the appropriation, including, as it 
does, parts of two calendar years.] 

Statement K. — Employment of Children. 
There are employed in the — 





Boys. 


Girls. 


Dormitories and other parts of the house, . 




16 


Sewing-room No 
Sewing-room No 
Dining-hall, 


1, 

2, 
















10 

20 


40 


Kitchen, 


















5 


_ 


Shoe shop, . 

Bakery, . 

Laundry, 

Hospital, 

On the farm and 


at th( 


i ban 


is, 












2 
5 
7 
2 
32 


2 


Dormitories and miscellaneous work about the house 






and grounds, 


40 


— 



Girls, 58; boys, 123; total, 181. 



Statement L. — Children boarded in Families. 
Children boarded in families Sept. 30, 1889, paid for from 

appropriation of State Primary School, .... 43 

Number of days' board paid for, 14,933 

Amount paid during the year, $4,009 41 

Weekly per capita cost, . . . . . . . $1 88 — 

Note. — This sum does not include expense of investigation of places, 
nor of visiting the children after being located, which is paid by the 
Department of Indoor Poor, and increases the cost to the State. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18, 



47 



Statement M. — Recapitulation of Inventoi 
Taken by Enos Calkins and James B. Shaw of Palmer, 

Sept. 30, 1889 

Land, 

Buildings, 

Live stock, ..... 
Products of farm, .... 
Carriages and agricultural implements 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 
Beds and bedding (inmates 1 ), 
Other furniture (inmates 1 ), . 
Clothing (inmates'), 
Superintendent's department, 

Dry goods, 

Groceries and provisions, 
Drugs and medicines, . 

Fuel, 

Library and school supplies, . 
Heating, water and gas (with fixtures) 
Miscellaneous, .... 



Mass., as of 



$22,664 81 


99,500 00 


7,931 80 


8,251 75 


3,653 28 


10,911 05 


4,927 97 


5,871 32 


4,797 12 


6,604 33 


1,759 67 


2,358 54 


310 05 


3,492 05 


1,584 08 


22,300 00 


1,471 43 


$208,389 25 



Statement N. — Receipts. 
Cash on hand at the beginning of the year, .... f 100 00 

received from unexpended appropriation of former 

calendar year, 11,674 34 

received from appropriation for the present calendar 

year, 39,521 40 

received from special appropriation for boarding out 

children, 4,009 41 

received from special appropriation for new boilers, . 9 22 

received from sales, 138 00 

$55,452 37 



Statement O. — Expenditures, 
Current Expenditures. 
For salaries, wages and labor, 
meat, 

fish, .... 
fruit and vegetables, 
flour, 

grain, feed and meal, 
tea, coffee and chocolate, 
sugar and molasses, 
milk, butter, eggs and cheese 



$17,670 95 

2,461 54 

423 48 

165 09 

2,456 25 

1,809 20 

499 51 

1,429 56 

2,719 77 



48 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



For other groceries and provisions, $1,154 36 

clothing, boots and shoes, ...... 5,653 90 

fuel and lights, 4,387 19 

hospital supplies, 402 28 

furniture, beds and bedding, kitchen and table ware, . 1,075 12 

transportation, 651 34 

ordinary repairs, 3,223 55 

extraordinary repairs, 1,553 09 

other current expenses, 3,459 56 

Total, , $51,195 74 

Extraordinary Expenditures. 

Payments to State Treasurer, 138 00 

For board of children in families, ..... 4,009 41 

For new boilers, ......... 9 22 



Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1889, 



Statement P. — Resources and Liabilities. 

Resources. 
Cash on hand, ......... 

Unexpended appropriations, ....... 



Miscellaneous bills, 



Liabilities. 



$55,352 37 


100 00 


$55,452 37 


$100 00 


16,601 64 


$16,701 64 


358 19 


$16,343 45 



Statement Q. — Summary of Farm Account. 

Dr. 

To live stock, as per inventory, 



wagons and agricultural implements, as per 

paid carpenter, painter, etc., for repairs, 

wages of farm help, 

board of farm help, . 

labor of children, 

live stock, 

grain, feed, etc., 

hardware, farm tools, etc 

blacksmithing and repairs, 

lumber, 

harness and repairs, 

seeds, fertilizers, etc., 

rent of pasture, 

sundries, . 



inventory, 



$7,019 


75 


2,143 


95 


486 


24 


2,096 


20 


1,102 


25 


460 00 


491 


50 


1,747 


77 


182 


51 


150 


63 


260 34 


130 


10 


105 


65 


165 00 


17 81 


$16,559 


70 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 49 

Cr. 

By farm product of 1888, as per inventory, .... $5,363 00 

labor for the school, 445 85 

cost of keeping horses used for school, . . . . 312 83 

sale of live stock, 155 00 

beef, . . . . . 640 71 

veal, 56 50 

pork, 629 82 

eggs and poultry, . . . . . . . 175 52 

milk, 5,713 92 

ice, 562 50 

wood, 137 50 

hay, straw, etc., 3,242 00 

fruit and vegetables, . . . . . . 3,09188 

120,527 03 



50 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S EEPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

The hospital report of the State Primary School for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1889, is as follows : — 



Number in hospital Sept. 30, 1888, 
admitted during the year, 
of deaths, 
discharged, . 
remaining in hospital Sept. 



0, 1889, 



22 

459 
3 

450 

28 



The following is a list of the cases admitted during the 
year. Some of the cases not admitted, but treated at the 
daily clinic, are also reported : — 



Pneumonia, . 


7 


Retroversion with chronic 




Bronchitis, 


51 


endometritis, 


1 


Pharyngitis, . 


19 


Incontinence of urine, . 


. 31 


Tonsillitis, 


27 


Amputation of stump below 




Tonsillitis, hypertrophic, 


2 


knee, .... 


1 


Bronchitis with follicular ton- 




Fatty tumor removed, . 


1 


sillitis, 


1 


Dislocated hip, 


1 


Epilepsy, 


6 


Dislocated scapula, 


1 


Neuralgia, 


1 


Dislocated finger, . 


1 


Herpes zoster, 


1 


Fracture (Colles's), 


1 


Asthma, . . 


1 


Crushed finger, 


1 


Indigestion, . 


154 


Wounds, punctured, 


3 


Gastritis, acute, 


1 


Wounds, lacerated, 


11 


Gastritis, chronic, . 


1 


Wounds, contused, 


6 


Stomatitis, 


1 


Sprains, 


14 


Constipation, . 


20 


Suppurating toes, . 


4 


Diarrhoea, 


8 


Suppurating thumb, 


1 


Febricula, 


2 


Spinal curvature, . 


5 


General debility, . 


9 


Paraplegia with scrotal her- 




Myalgia, 


2 


nia, .... 


1 


Varicose veins, 


1 


Coxalgia, 


5 


Dysmenorrhcea, 


1 


Weak ankles, 


1 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



51 



Burns, . 
Rachitis, 

Malignant tumor, . 
Scrofulosis, . 
Furuncle, 
Rhus poisoning", 
Wen, . 

Facial erysipelas, . 
Acute rheumatism, 



2 
1 
1 
3 
to 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Scarlatina, 

Cyanosis, 

Mumps, . . • 

Eczema,. 

Molluscum epithelial e, 

Urticaria, 

Croup, . 

Not classified, 

Rhinitis, 



Diseases of the Eye. 



Contusion of eyelids, . . 2 

Blepharitis, .... 5 

Trachoma, .... 1 

Trachoma with pannus, . 1 

Conjunctivitis, catarrhal, . 7 

Conjunctivitis, phlyctenular, 3 

Staphyloma (anterior), . 1 

Squint convergent, tenotomy 

of internal rectus, . . 2 



Squint divergent, tenotomy 

of external rectus, 
Operation for trichiasis, 
Excision of wart.of upper lid, 
Leucoma, . 

Asthenopia, . . . . 
Hypermetrophic squint, 
Mucocele, . 



1 
1 
3 

11 
2 
2 
4 

21 
1 



Diseases of the Ear. 
Otitis media purulenta acuta, . 
Otitis media purulenta chronica, 
Otitis externa circumspecta, . 



There have been three deaths during the year. Two died 
of pneumonia ; one a delicate boy of five years, and the 
other a boy of fourteen, with spinal curvature. The third 
was a girl of ten, with hip-joint disease. She died of acute 
parenchymatous nephritis. 

The amputation referred to in the list was for a bad stump, 
where the flaps had contracted, leaving the bone exposed ; 
thus keeping the part inflamed and sensitive, and causing 
the boy much discomfort. The operation was performed by 
our consulting physician, Dr. Wm. Holbrook. The patient 
made a good recovery, and has had no trouble since. 

Among the crippled and deformed children in the hos- 
pital is a blind girl three years of age, who has never eaten, 
and will not now eat, solid food. This is, I think, the second 
case of the kind on record. 

Another little waif, of nine years, and far below the aver- 
age in bodily development, was sent to the hospital last 
April in a half-starved, miserable condition, weighing only 



52 RRJMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

2A\ pounds. She has gained slowly but steadily since her 
entrance until now, when her weight is 33^ pounds. 

The girl referred to in last year's report, affected with 
attacks similar to epileptic vertigo, was discharged from the 
hospital in August. She now goes to school, and has shown 
no signs of her trouble since March. 

James Daniels, also referred to in last year's report, as 
suffering from epilepsy, continued to improve until January, 
when he was discharged from the school and so lost sight of. 

There has been no epidemic this year. Any child suffer- 
ing from a contagious affection is isolated, as are also all 
doubtful cases, and every precaution is taken to prevent the 
further spread of the disease. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CALLIEVAIUS L. HAYNES, 

Resident Physician. 
Monson, Oct. 1, 1889. 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 53 



PRINCIPAL'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the State Primary School. 

Your attention is respectfully invited to the progress made 
in the school during the year just concluded. The follow- 
ing general statements are presented. 

Enrolment of Attendance. 
Number of pupils enrolled Oct. 1, 1888 : Boys, 218 ; girls, 68 ; total, 286 
Number of pupils enrolled, 1888-89 : Boys, 390; girls, 134; total, . 524 
Largest number belonging (September, 1889), .... 300 

Smallest number belonging (May, 1889), 248 

Average daily attendance, 1888-89, . 275 

Admitted, 1888-89, .157 

Readmitted, 1888-89, 81 

Discharged, 1888-89, 214 

Died, 2 

Number of pupils enrolled Sept. 30, 1889 : Boys, 222 ; girls, 86 ; 

total, 308 

Number of teachers, 9 

Average age of pupils, 10 years, 9 months. 

Illiteracy at entering. 

Could not read or write, 61 

Could read and not write, 7 

Could both read and write, 89 

Never studied arithmetic, 70 

Never studied geography, 94 

Of those admitted, 36 had received instruction in physi- 
ology and hygiene, 5 in history and 7 in both. 

Population. 
It will be observed that the year closes with twenty-two 
more pupils in school than it had when it began. Thirty- 
one more pupils have been admitted than last year, and not 
as many readmitted. About the same number (214) have 
been discharged, and there have been but two deaths. 



54 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

The number of pupils in the higher classes, a greater part 
of the time, is less than in the lower. This is owing to 
the fact that the children are largely chosen from the higher 
classes to be placed out. Pupils after reaching the afternoon 
divisions of the first and fifth classes remain in them until 
leaving the school. This, and the fact just stated, often 
necessitate numerous small classes, with sometimes but one 
in a class. 

Clay Modelling. 

While our classrooms number one less than formerly, let 
it not be supposed we have retrograded, and had no use 
for the usual number. The room formerly occupied by the 
seventh class is now used for work in clay, where the third 
and fifth classes devote an hour and a half, once a week, to 
this most fascinating work. They have cut in clay the 
square, half-square, right-angled triangle, oblong, oblong 
divided, equilateral triangle and the same divided, hexagonal 
forms from the square and circle, circle with its divisions, 
and have moulded the sphere, cube and cylinder, in twelve 
lessons. This work of creating out of lumps of crude clay 
a form of beauty, with which they are more or less familiar, 
is intensely enjoyed by the little builders. 

Instructions in paper folding have been given by the 
kindergarten teacher in the fourth, sixth and seventh classes, 
and in the third and fifth classes by the teachers in charge. 
The geometrical forms from the square and circle have con- 
tained lessons of interest and profit, and especially when car- 
ried forward in clay have left lasting impressions upon the 
plastic minds of the children. 

The privilege granted Mrs. Blaisdell and myself last April, 
to visit "The Workingman's School" in New York City, 
afforded us an opportunity of inspecting and appropriating 
feasible features of the work, which have proved to be valu- 
able accessions. 

Manual Tkaining. 
In May it was decided to introduce manual training into 
the school ; and it accordingly became a part of the pro- 
gramme, with a special instructor in charge. The room 
formerly used for the kindergarten is now occupied by the 
boys of the first and second classes in manual training. 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 55 

They have had lessons an hour and a half in length, once a 
week, during which time they have learned the names of 
tools, how to measure and lay off a line, draw the plan of a 
box on different scales, saw the pieces and construct a box, 
cross and mallet. One boy purchased a lock and attached 
it to the box he had made, in such a deft manner as to merit 
the compliment from a carpenter, " A fine piece of work, 
well done." 

Calisthenics, 

Calisthenics are now taught, all the classes having been in 
charge of one teacher (Mrs. Blaisdell), excepting the morn- 
ing divisions of the three upper classes, which have received 
drill from their respective teachers. 

All thorough educators recognize the necessity of waking 
up the mind and holding the attention of those taught ; and, 
because the end is so hardly attained among those of illiter- 
ate parentage, I wish to especially emphasize the valuable 
aid in this direction we have realized in the introduction 
of mechanical work. A large majority of our pupils lack 
the motive power of study; i.e., an inherent love for it. 
To such, an intellectual acquirement, where the mind alone 
is addressed, can only be attained by using compulsory 
methods, which defeat the end desired by arousing a positive 
dislike, because of the forced mental effort which is drudgery 
to the apathetic mind. On the contrary, manual labor, 
first, attracts and pleases ; second, tangible objects are pro- 
duced by individual effort ; third, the mind has unconsciously 
and naturally, step by step, mastered the details, until it has 
a perfect conception of the whole from the finished model. 
In short, mechanical work compels unconscious attention ; 
and in place of dread for a task, desire is awakened, and 
love for it buds into being. 

Outside Helps. 

The teachers were all very much interested and benefited 
by attending, last May, the Teachers' Association held in 
Springfield. It awakened a livelier interest in everything 
pertaining to school work. The encouragement derived and 
the stimulus gained were invaluable. 

I wish to thankfully acknowledge various books valuable 



56 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

for reference, which have been generously supplied during 
the year. Seventeen bound volumes of " St. Nicholas" 
and eight of ' * Wide Awake " have been added to the school 
library, which are much prized by teachers and pupils. 
These are often loaned as a reward for work well done. 
The promised loan of one of these books acts as an incentive 
on the mind of even the slowest intellect. We hope the 
few moments spent in the choice company of the pure and 
beautiful may some time bear fruit in the busy walks of life. 
Many of the boys are very fond of reading, and can easily be 
led to read the best literature, if something of the contents 
is unfolded to them by a judicious teacher. 

Entertainments . 

Three entertainments were given by the different classes 
during the winter term. Thirty-nine weekly concerts have 
been given Sunday evenings by the five highest classes, in 
turn ; and three general concerts when all classes united, — 
at Christmas, Easter and Children's Day. These exercises 
have sustained, if not exceeded, the reputation for merit 
gained in the past. 

Conclusion. 

The list of teachers (Appendix), I am glad to say, 
remains nearly the same as last year. It gives me pleasure 
to testify to their fidelity in the school-room. They have 
been well tried, and deserve the confidence of the trustees 
and superintendent. Mrs. L. J. Blaisdell, a successful 
teacher for over seven years, resigned her position in 
September. Miss J. L. Clark succeeded her. Miss Kate 
L. Blenus, on account of failing health, was obliged to resign 
her class. It is now in charge of Miss E. E. Kenerson. 

I thank you for your kindly assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Monson, Oct. 1, 1889. 



EUGENIA M. FULLINGTON, 

Principal. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT No. 18. 



57 









j^j 


cm. 


iyuL. 


<v. 








Teachers. — 1889-90. 












Class. 


Miss E. 


M. Fullington, 






First. 


Miss Carrie Lacey, . 










Second. 


Miss G. 


A 


Cheney, . 










Third. 


Miss E 


E 


Kenerson, 










Fourth. 


Mrs. J. 


J. 


Prentiss, . 










Fifth. 


Mrs. H 


E 


Darte, 










Sixth. 


Miss F. 


J. 


Dyer, 










Seventh. 


Miss J. 


L. 


Clark, 










Kindergarten. 


Mr. L. 


W. 


Eddy, 










Manual training 



Fall term 
Winter term begins 
Spring term begins 
Summer term begins 
Fall term begins 



School Calendar. — 1889-90. 

Ends Nov. 1. 



Number of school weeks in the year, 
Number of school days in the year, 



Nov. 11 ; ends Jan. 31. 
Feb. 10 ; ends May 2. 
May 12 ; ends July 25. 
Aug. 11. 

17 
229 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS 



WESTBOROUGH. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

The year just ended has been one of much activity. The 
growth of the school in numbers, the enlargement of its 
material resources, the broadening and improvement of its 
educational facilities, together with the inevitable mass of 
routine duties, have taxed all available nerve force. 

The purchase of the Wilson farm has nearly doubled our 
acreage. The addition of two dwellings and a superin- 
tendent's house has increased our households from four to 
seven. The general laundry, which had become inadequate 
to the demands upon it, was abandoned last winter. An 
assistant matron was appointed for each of the family 
houses, and all laundry work and repair of clothing have 
since been done at the family houses. The employment of 
this additional officer has proved of advantage in so many 
ways as to fully justify the increased expenditure. 

The health of the school has been excellent. The dietary 
has been somewhat re-enforced, the aim being to put into 
it, in due proportion, every element which can be of ad- 
vantage to a growing boy. The additions consist in five 
ounces of butter and three ounces of cheese per week, oat- 
meal mush twice a week, corn-meal mush once, bean soup 
once and pea soup once a week. 

The boys have been employed indoors even less than here- 
tofore. Every day, when the weather would permit, all 
those not needed for household duties have been at work 
upon the farm. No men except the farmer and assistant 
farmer have been employed to do farm work, even at the 
height of the busy season. The boys have seemed unusu- 
ally contented. A disposition to escape has been remark- 



62 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

able for the rarity of its exhibition, the escapes being 
confined almost exclusively to homesick new-comers. 

Our numbers have grown apace from 142 at the beginning 
of the year to 184 at its close. The total number of boys 
returned from their places, together with those recommitted 
to the school, has been only 19, of whom 9 remained in 
school September 30. More have been placed out on pro- 
bation the past year than in any one of the five previous 
years ; yet the increase in commitments has steadily raised 
the average attendance from 127 last year to 168 this. This 
average is higher by 40 than in any other year since 1881. 

As foreseen, the present accommodations are greatly 
over-crowded ; and this condition of things is seriously 
embarrassing the good work attempted for the boys, to say 
nothing of the positive and grave evils of a moral nature, 
attendant upon over-crowding. With the influx which 
usually becomes greater as winter approaches, while the 
opportunities for placing boys out are diminished, it is 
difficult to see how the boys can be properly cared for 
without an increase of houseroom. One additional house 
is needed for immediate wants, and another to provide for 
the probable growth of the coming year. It does not seem 
wise economy to negative the full efficiency of many thou- 
sands of dollars, that an expenditure which must finally be 
made may be deferred for a few months. The school has 
not yet grown to unwieldy proportions, and an increase in 
the number of houses will not mean a material increase in 
the number of general officers. At the same time, facili- 
ties may be provided for the training of a greater number, 
which would seem too expensive for a small number. As 
an illustration in point, the principal teacher provided by 
you last winter has made it possible to reduce the work of 
the several schools to a good degree of system and uni- 
formity. Through the help of an efficient principal, that 
intimate knowledge of the daily work of the several schools 
may be maintained, which is necessary to enable the superin- 
tendent to advise intelligently concerning a homogeneous plan 
of conducting the different schools. The manual training, 
too, so auspiciously begun, would hardly be undertaken for 
a small number of boys, on account of the large expense. 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 63 

I call your special attention to the report of the principal, 
Miss Pettit, which shows clearly some directions in which 
progress has been made. In nothing has the school shown 
so marked an awakening as along the intellectual line. 
Where listlessness and apathy were the prevailing tone, one 
notes life and interest. An eagerness to know is mani- 
fested, quite in contrast with the stolid indifference which 
was too generally observable in the school-room a year ago. 
It is not true that these boys will not respond to rational 
methods of instruction. It is true that they are preter- 
naturally sharp in reading faces and in detecting the ability 
of a teacher to do what she professes ; and, alas for the 
weak or incompetent, they possess little chivalry and no 
respect for incompetency. Once convinced, however, that 
their instructor is fully equal to all emergencies, and is in- 
terested in them, and it is rare to find one of these boys 
who will not at least try. The boy at this stage is in a 
hopeful condition, and may be aroused to entertain higher 
ideals. Right here comes in the most critical and important 
part of the work for these boys. It is also likely to be the 
most disappointing and disheartening. The most suscepti- 
ble and tractable are often the first to fail ; and so the anx- 
ious seed-sower too often is ready to exclaim, " The work 
has failed." How unwilling we are to cultivate carefully 
the elements of manhood in these boys, without being able 
to see the fruitage ! They who are unwilling to walk by 
faith have little right to tread these paths, or try to deal 
with this class of humanity. 

To get and keep good teachers seems to be a matter of 
some difficulty. Your decision to give teachers a longer 
vacation, seems to me a move in the right direction. Both 
school and teachers seemed benefited by the longer vacation. 

The school for manual training has been organized under 
the direction of Miss Anna Wilcox. Miss Wilcox has had 
experience with the class of pupils to be found here. She 
is a graduate of one of the normal schools of the Common- 
wealth, and has also had an excellent course of training for 
her specialty. She has begun her work in a very satisfac- 
tory manner. Every boy in the school is receiving one and 
one-half hours' instruction in the manual training-room each 



64 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

week. The system followed is the Slojd or Swedish. The 
work is planned with reference to its educational value 
alone, — to teach the boy to think, to judge, and to give 
tangible form to his judgment. Unless it proves a mind- 
awakener, a provoker of thought, the system will count for 
little more than a failure. It is too soon to speak of results, 
but the manual training-school promises w r ell. 

As you are aware, I regard the arousing of dormant 
faculties in the minds of our pupils as the key-note to suc- 
cess in this work. Not that some of them are not sharp 
enough, but their sharpness is of a narrow, peculiar, unde- 
sirable and for the most part useless kind. They have eyes 
to see what they ought not to see, ears quick to detect the 
evil and debasing. To care for them, feed properly, clothe 
comfortably, keep within the bounds of proper decorum 
by holding before their minds, in season and out of season, 
the motive of a speedy release on condition of conformity to 
certain rules, being careful to release them before the motive 
has grown threadbare, may be a good way to hold boys, 
prevent escapes, and present an appearance of good work ; 
but it is a very open question whether this amounts to more 
than an amelioration of the evils of commitment to a jail or 
house of correction for a short term. To accomplish much 
in stirring to new life a mind blunted by wrong habits and 
unfavorable surroundings, more than ten or twelve months' 
discipline is required. By our present system of credits, a 
boy may earn his release in less than a year. There are 
cases, doubtless, where a speedy release may be wise ; but 
the most of these are cases for. special action. For those 
whom it is desirable to detain here for any length of time, I 
do not see that much can be expected of a school course 
of less than two years' duration, when the former training 
of the boys we receive is considered. The same may be 
said of accomplishing much in manual training in a less 
period. I hesitate somewhat in pressing any increase in the 
length of time our pupils shall be kept, however vital it may 
seem to success, on account of the embarrassment we are 
under from insufficient accommodations. But I believe a 
way should be found to do whatever ought to be done. 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 65 

Table No. 9 has been added to those generally given, and 
groups statistics which may be suggestive. 

My officers as a whole have been faithful, and to their 
hearty co-operation is due any measure of success thus far 
attained. 

To your honorable Board is due my grateful acknowledg- 
ment for your uniform manifestation of a large-minded 
readiness to entertain any plan looking to an improvement 
of the school ; also for your valued counsel, and not least 
for your abundant sympathy and encouragement. 



Kespectfully submitted. 



T. F. CHAP1N, 

Superintendent. 



Westborough, Oct. 14, 1889. 



M 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Table No. 1. 

Showing the Number received and discharged, and the General 

Condition of the School, for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1889. 



Boys in school Sept. 30, 1888, 



142 



Received. — Since committed, 
Recommitted, . 
Returned from places, 
" by police, . 
" voluntarily, 
'* by institution officers, 

Whole number in school during the year, 

Released. — On probation to parents, . 
On probation to others, . 
To Massachusetts Reformatory, 
To accompany parents out of the State, 
To Superintendent of Indoor Poor, . 
By elopement (all returned), . 



124 

5 
5 

2 

6 

12 



50 

43 

3 

1 

5 

10 



154 

296 



112 



Remaining in school Sept. 30, 1889, 



184 



Table No. 2. 

Showing the Admissions, Number discharged, and Average Number 

of each Month. 



MONTHS. 



Admitted. 



Discharged. 



Average Xo. 



1888. 

October, 
November, . 
December, . 

1889. 

January, 
February, . 
March, 
April, . 
May, . 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 
September, . 

Totals, . 



21 
15 
16 



18 
4 
12 
7 
14 
10 
10 
14 
13 



154 



16 
8 
5 



11 

2 

10 

11 

13 

10 

10 

7 

9 



112 



142.80 
149.80 
156.25 



170.93 
173.14 
174.64 
174.83 
174.22 
17286 
172.09 
175.30 
181.90 



168.23 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



67 



Table No. 3. 

Showing the Commitments from the Several Counties the Past Year 
and previously. 



COUNTIES. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, .... 




50 


50 


Berkshire, 










6 


209 


215 


Bristol, 










16 


538 


554 


Dukes, 










1 


12 


13 


Essex, 
Franklin, . 










20 


982 
53 


1,002 
53 


Hampden, 
Hampshire, 
Middlesex, 
Nantucket, 










11 
3 

25 


338 

72 

1,062 

16 


349 
75 

1,087 
16 


Norfolk, . 










2 


937 


939 


Plymouth, 
Suffolk, . 
Worcester, 










5 
17 

18 


110 

1,210 

664 


115 
1,227 

682 


Totals, 










124 


6,253 


6,377 



Table No. 4. 

Showing Nativity of Parents of Boys committed during the Tear. 

Fathers American born, 7 

Mothers American born, .13 

Fathers foreign born, 11 

Mothers foreign born, 9 

Both parents American born, . 29 

Both parents foreign born, . . . . . . . .71 

Unknown, . . . . . 13 



Showing Nativity of Boys committed during the Year. 

American born, 105 

Foreign born, . 17 

Unknown, 2 

Total, 124 



68 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Table No. 5. 

Showing by ivhat Authority the Commitments have been made the 

Past Year. 



COMMITMENTS. 



Past Year. 



By district court, 
municipal court, 
police court, 
superior court, 
trial justices, . 

Total, . 



50 
9 

53 
3 
9 



124 



Table No. 6. 
Showing Age of Boys when committed. 



AGE. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Six, 




5 


5 


Seven, 








_ 


25 


25 


Eight, 


, 






- 


117 


117 


Nine, 


. 






_ 


235 


235 


Ten,. 


, 






4 


440 


444 


Eleven, 








6 


638 


644 


Twelve, 








20 


719 


739 


Thirteen, 


, 






27 


864 


891 


Fourteen, 


, 






66 


1,087 


1,153 


Fifteen, 


, 






- 


897 


897 


Sixteen, 


. 






- 


930 


930 


Seventeen, 






- 


280 


280 


Eighteen and over, 






- 


59 


59 


Unknown, 






1 


30 


31 


Total, 


• 


• 




124 


6,326 


6,450 



Average age of boys, 13.07. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



69 



Table No. 7. 

Showing the Domestic Condition of Boys who have been Inmates 
of the School during Year. % 



CONDITION. 


Number. 


Had parents, 








176 


no parents, . 








14 


father, . 








39 


mother, . 








50 


step-father, . 








11 


step-mother, 








15 


intemperate father, 








80 


intemperate mother, . 








10 


both intemperate parents, 








50 


parents separated, 








8 


attended church, . 








259 


never attended church, 








15 


never attended school, 








- 


not attended school within one year, . 




18 


two years, 




8 


three years, 




8 


been arrested before, 




198 


been inmates of other institutions, 




74 


used intoxicating liquor, 




36 


used tobacco (mostly cigarettes), 




189 


Were employed in mill or otherwise when arrested, 




154 


idle, 




38 


attending school, 




93 


Could not read or write, 




3 


Parents owning residence, 




42 


Members of family had been arrested, 




107 



70 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Table No. 8. 

Shoivs the Length of Time the Boys who have left the 
have spent in the School since Commitment. 



3 months or less, 

4 months, 
5 



year, 



1 month, 

2 months, 
3 

4 

5 " 



9 , " 
10 
11 
2 years, . 

1 month, 

2 months, 



4 

4 
5 
4 
in 
9 
9 
5 



2 years 3 months, 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 

2 

3 years, 

o 
o 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 



4 

5 " 
G " 

7 " 

8 " 

9 " 
10 " 
11 

1 month, 

2 months 

3 " 

4 " 
5 

6 " 

7 " 



Past Year 
1 



9 
10 

11 



4 years and more, 



Total, 



Average time spent in the institution, 17.3 months 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



71 



Table No. 9. 

Comparative Table, showing Average Numbers, New Commit- 
ments, etc., for a Period of Ten Years. 





Average 


New Com- 


Returned 
for any 
cause. 


Placed on 


Discharged 




Number. 


mitments. 


probation. 


otherwise. 


1879-80, 








206.88 


95 


36 


79 


80 


1880-81, 








176.60 


71 


76 


92 


107 


1881-82, 








113.61 


108 


39 


146 


11 


1882-83, 








114.28 


100 


14 


125 


19 


1883-84, 








128.80 


fl38 


33 


81 


43 


1881-85,* 








112.18 


64 


33 


81 


71 


1885-86, 








92.82 


59 


44 


90 


18 


1886-87, 








104.32 


93 


31 


80 


16 


1887-88, 








127.24 


99 


38 


91 


22 


1888-89, 








168.23 


124 


39 


93 


19 


Average f c 


no j 


fears 


134.49 


95.1 


38.3 


96 


40.6 



* April, 1885, removed to present location. 

t First year after the reduction of the age for admission from 17 to 14 years. 



List of Articles Repaired in the Sewing-room during Year ending 









Oct. 1, 


1889. 




Aprons, .... 4 


Shirts, . 


. 1,194 


Blankets, 






1 


Spreads, 


15 


Jackets, 






496 


Stocking's, . 


. 1,028 


Napkins, 






4 


Table cloths, 


39 


Pants, . 






1,009 


Towels, 


95 


Pillow slips, 






66 


Vests, . 


5 


Pillow ticks 






7 






Robes, . 






2 


Total, . 


.' 4,088 


Sheets, 






123 







72 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



List of Articles Made in the Sewing-room during the Year ending 







Oct. 1, 


1889. 








Aprons, 


. 


42 


Pillow ticks, . 2 


Caps, . 




218 


Sheets, 






260 


Coffee bags, 




1 


Shirts, . 






769 


Collars, 




120 


Spreads, 






3 


Dish towels, 




86 


Suspenders, 






74 


Linen jackets, 




6 


Table cloths, 






15 


Mattresses, . 




3 


Towels, 






346 


Napkins, 




24 








Pillow slips, 




192 


Total, .... 2,161 


Laundr 


y Work 


for Year ending Oct. _Z, 1889. 


Number pieces 


washec 


, 90,228 


" 


ironed, 


. 65,667 


it tc 


starche 


d,. 


. 




5,997 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 73 



PRINCIPAL'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the Lyman School for Boys. 

There were in the school at the beginning of the year 142 
boys. During the year 124 new scholars have entered ; 20 
have returned, of whom 9 are still here; 102 have been dis- 
charged ; so that at present there are in the school 184 boys, 
the average age of whom is 14.06 years. There has been 
very little irregularity in attendance, from sickness or other 
cause. The work of the past seven months has been to me 
increasingly interesting, and the results attained are encour- 
aging. 

In order to grade each school properly, every boy, upon 
entering, has been examined and classified according to his 
qualifications. By this means, supplemented by personal 
effort on the part of teachers with individual pupils, we have 
succeeded in reducing each school to two grades, thus ren- 
dering it possible to do far more effective work, and also for 
all the teachers to carry out the same general plan, the pro- 
gramme of which accompanies this report. 

All the pupils of each school pursue, as one class, the 
studies of the afternoon, with the exception of arithmetic 
and spelling, in which subjects there are two divisions. The 
more advanced class in arithmetic is expected to finish the 
subject of percentage in its various applications, take mensu- 
ration, and review the work of two years. In one school a 
number of boys were prepared and desirous to accomplish 
more in mathematics than the other members of their class ; 
so they were allowed to begin algebra, in which subject they 
have become much interested, and have made considerable 
progress. 

The second class in arithmetic takes the fundamental prin- 



74 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

ciples of numbers, common and decimal fractions, denom- 
inate numbers, reduction, and a general review at the close 
of the year. 

Exercises tending to develop the bodily powers and give 
relaxation from study, have occupied five minutes of each 
afternoon. 

Pupils have been drilled in sentence-building, and have 
been required to correct errors made in the use of language, 
and, in recitation, to give answers in complete sentences. 

Much attention has been paid to spelling, which has been 
a written exercise, much varied in its character. 

In penmanship, regular and systematic drill in the princi- 
ples and free-hand movement has been given, resulting in 
marked improvement in the writing of the boys. 

Oral instruction in the elements of physiology and hygiene, 
with familiar, practical talks on the results of violated laws 
of health, has been given three times a week. In this sub- 
ject, as also in civil government, the same outline has been 
followed in all the schools. 

Observation lessons have had a prominent place in the 
work of each day. In the spring and early summer, flowers 
were the objects to which attention was called ; and later, 
trees of various kinds have been thoroughly examined with 
reference to their size, form, texture, relative position of 
parts, growth, etc. This work has been done not only in 
the school-room, with branches of trees before the pupils, 
but also in the open field and by the wayside, where the 
peculiarities of individual trees could be noted. When all 
have been led to recognize the characteristics of flower and 
tree, each has expressed on paper, in his own language, the 
knowledge thus gained, and also has represented the object 
by a free-hand drawing. 

Believing that mental development may be acquired 
through the exercise of the senses, touch and sight, much 
attention has been given to form study and drawing. Pupils 
have modelled in clay from solids, likewise from objects in 
nature ; and from paper, sticks and tablets, they have also 
made type-forms, which they have afterwards reproduced 
on paper. Miss Lizzie Sanborn gave instruction in this 
branch for several months, with very satisfactory results. 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 75 

Miss Anna Wilcox is her successor, and already her enthu- 
siasm has aroused a greater interest, and we look for even 
better results. In this subject, as also in music, the boys 
have been taught mostly by the teacher in charge. To render 
her work more efficient, she has taught under the direction of 
the special instructress, who has also given one or two les- 
sons per week in each school. This plan has succeeded 
admirably. 

Music has been introduced as a study ; and the majority 
of the boys, who seven months ago could sing only by rote, 
can now from dictation write quite difficult music in several 
keys, then read and sing it from their own work. The boy 
who does not sing, and that with a will, is the exception 
rather than the rule. 

Earnest efforts have been made to divert the minds of the 
pupils from channels of pernicious thought, by interesting 
them in biographical and historical subjects, and reading of 
a pure, ennobling character. Marked improvement in this 
direction is noticeable. 

To test the memory and thoroughness of the pupils, 
written examinations have been given occasionally. As a 
rule, the boys have passed these creditably ; and many have 
had papers which, for neatness and accuracy, would do credit 
to an academic student. The first Saturday evening of every 
month has been devoted to letter-writing. 

The various periodicals furnished the school are eagerly 
looked for by the boys ; and the educational journals are 
especially welcome to many of the more advanced pupils, 
as also to the teachers. 

Meetings of the teachers for consultation, and mutual 
assistance and encouragement in their work, have been held 
regularly once a week. 

Many thanks for your assistance and counsel, always so 
heartily given, and for the co-operation of the teachers. 

MARY L. PETTIT, 

Principal. 



76 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



RAMME OF 


Lyman 


School for Boys. — 1889-1890. 

Afternoon. 


2-2.25, 


, 


Drawing. 


2.25-3.25, 


, 


Arithmetic. 


3.25-3.30, 


. 


Calisthenics. 


3.30-3.50, 




Music. 


3.50-4, 

4-4.10, 

4.10-4.30, 




Spelling. 
Penmanship. 
Observation lesson. 

Evening. 


6-6.15, 

6.15-6.45, 

6.45-7, 




Physiology, — Civil Government 
Geography, — History. 
Lano;uao;e. 


7-7.30, 




Reading. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



77 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



1888 — October, received from the State Treasurer, . . $3,062 88 


November, 


* 










2,283 86 


December, 


< 










3,458 49 


1889 — January, ' 


* 










4,120 92 


February, 


' 










4,080 78 


March, 


* 










3,337 50 


April, 


• 










2,922 23 


May, 


ii 










2,730 33 


June, 


i t 










2,568 52 


July, 


' 










2,377 00 


August, 


c t 










2,331 31 


September, " 










4,012 04 




$37,285 86 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 

1888 — October, $3,062 88 

November, 2,283 86 

December, 3,458 49 

1889 — January, , 4,120 92 

February, 4,080 78 

March, . 3,337 50 

April, 2,922 23 

May, 2,730 33 

June, 2,568 52 

July, 2,377 00 

August, 2,331 31 

September, 4,012 04 

$37,285 86 



78 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Amount drawn from State Treasury. 

Special Appropriation for Lyman Hall Alterations. 

1888 — October, .......... $168 91 

November, 700 75 

December, 1,030 74 

$1,900 40 

Amount drawn from State Treasury. 
Special Appropriation for Superintendents and Officers' 1 House. 

1888 — October, $997 99 

November,. . 1,260 33 

December, 1,362 19 

1889 — May, 2,033 21 

$5,653 72 

Amount drawn from State Treasury. 
Special Appropriation for Repairs on Cobb Farm (Wilson Farm). 

1889 — April, $2,27109 

June, .......... 809 92 

July, 265 24 

September, 685 87 

$4,032 12 

Expenditures. 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Lyman Hall Alterations. 

1888 — October, $16891 

November, 700 75 

December, 1,030 74 

$1,900 40 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Superintendents and 
Officers' 1 House. 

1888 — October, $997 99 

November, 1,260 33 

December, . . ... . . . . 1,362 19 

1889 — May, . . 2,033 21 

$5,653 72 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



79 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Repairs on Cobb Farm 

{Wilson Farm). 

1889 — April, $2,27109 

June, . .'• . 809 92 

July, 265 24 

September, . . 685 87 

$4,032 12 



Expenditures for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1889. 
Salaries of officers and employees, ..... $13,856 36 
Wages of other persons temporarily employed, . . . 894 49 



Provision and grocery supplies, including 

Meat, 

Fish, 

Fruit and vegetables, . 
Flour, bread and cereals, 
Tea, coffee and chocolate, 
Sugar and molasses, 
Milk, butter and cheese, 
Other groceries and provisions, 
Clothing of all kinds, . 
Fuel and lights, 

Medicines and medical supplies, 
Furniture, beds and bedding, 



School property, books and supplies, 
Ordinary repairs, . 



Horse and cattle shoeing, 

Express, freight and passenger fares 

Stationery, postage, telegrams and newspapers 

Seeds, plants and fertilizers, farm tools and repairing 

Rent and water, 

Printing material, . 

Live stock, .... 

Grain, feed and meal for stock, 



sam 



1,435 


96 


395 


05 


296 


54 


3,247 


19 


227 


88 


577 


20 


1,006 


15 


842 


25 


2,279 


36 


2,852 34 


90 


51 


3,384 


92 


772 30 


1,359 


05 


125 82 


686 


01 


292 


61 


432 52 


510 00 


58 57 


774 26 


888 52 


$37,285 86 



80 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Superintendent's Report of Cash Transactions. 







Farm 

Troduce 

Sales. 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Sales. 


Labor 

of 
Boys. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


1888. 














October, . 


Received cash from, 


$0 50 


- 


- 


- 


$0 50 


November, 


<< <« << 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


December, 


<< «< << 


30 45 


- 


- 


- 


30 45 


1889. 














January, . 


<« (< <« 


1 00 


- 


- 


- 


1 00 


February, 


<< tt << 


75 


- 


- 


- 


75 


March, . 


ii << << 


75 


$1 25 


- 


- 


2 00 


April, 


" « 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


May, 


tt (< a 


3 06 


2 00 


- 


$3 00 


8 06 


June, 


St (< (( 


17 40 


1 50 


$500 00 


- 


518 90 


July, 


«( (( <( 


82 35 


- 


- 


- 


82 35 


August, . 


a H a 


6 58 


1 00 


8 05 


- 


15 63 


September, 





61 90 


20 00 


1 05 


- 


82 95 


Totals, . 


$204 74 


$25 75 


$509 10 


$3 00 


$742 59 



Superintendent's Report of Cash Transactions — Disbursements. 







Farm 

Produce 

Sales. 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Sales. 


Labor 

of 
Boys. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


1888. 














October, . 


Paid State Treasurer, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


November, 


«< (< << 


- 


- 




- 


- 


December, 


a a a 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1889. 














January, . 


tt 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


February, 


a 


$32 70 


- 


- 


- 


$32 70 


March, . 


a a a 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


April, 


a a a 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


May, 


a n a 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


June, 


tt tt a 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


July, 


tt 


21 21 


$4 75 


$500 00 


$3 00 


528 96 


August, . 


a 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


September, 


tt a a 


150 83 


21 00 


9 10 


- 


180 93 


Totals, . 


$204 74 


$25 75 


$5i'9 10 


$3 00 


$742 59 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



81 






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Water, 



Eh 






02 


En 




Ph 


PLh 


OQ 


5 


O 


O 


Ed 


^ 


h 


s 


fs. 


w 


3 


M 


p 





82 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S EEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools, 

The accompanying table gives a condensed statement of 
the physician's work at the Lyman School for the past year. 

Notwithstanding the formidable showing, the number of 
days lost by sickness has been small, and the physical condi- 
tion of the boys as good as possible, considering whence they 
come and the heritage they bring. 

For two years it has been evident the school was receiving 
a larger proportion of young and physically weak boys than 
formerly; and, as the strong are first to be sent out, it fol- 
lows that the weak accumulate, and come to constitute a 
majority of those remaining a year or more. 

The masters look well to the health of their boys, and 
promptly attend to the first symptoms of disease ; conse- 
quently, many are sent to the hospital, who, in ordinary 
families, would not receive medical attention ; but there is 
reason to believe that some are saved from serious sickness 
by this early attention. 

Last March, hospital ticket blanks were furnished the sev- 
eral families, with instructions that each boy coming to the 
hospital should bring one properly filled and signed by his 
master, requesting admission. This was done to prevent 
boys applying without sanction of their officers ; also to 
serve as a record, the tickets being placed on file. In this 
way a more perfect record is obtained, which, in a measure, 
accounts for the large number of cases which appear in the 
table. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



83 





1888. 










188S 


. 












u 

O 
o 

O 


<a 

a 

> 
o 


a> 

s 

o 

V 

Q 


>> 

i- 

es 

P 
C 
cS 
»"5 


s 




ft, 
"5 


>> 

a 

3 


6 

c 
s 




P 

60 
< 


0) 
S 

0D 


O „ 



Eh 


Abscess, . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


l 


_ 


_ 


2 


1 


5 


Burn, 






















1 


- 


1 


Colds, . 


2 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


2 


- 


1 


- 


- 


8 


Catarrh, . 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 


- 


1 


6 


Constipation, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Caries, . 




1 






















1 


Canker, . 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


1 


4 


Colic, . 




















1 


2 


- 


3 


Dislocation, . 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


1 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


1 


Debility, 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


2 


Diarrhoea, 




















1 


3 


_ 


4 


Erysipelas, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Epilepsy, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


Epistaxis, 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


Enlarged glands, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


2 


- 


6 


Enurisis, 


















5 


2 


_ 


. 


7 


Fever, 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




1 




2 


_ 


_ 


3 


Fracture, 


- 


1 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


6 


Heart disease, 


_ 


1 






















1 


Headache, 


_ 


_ 


1 


. 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


_ 


4 


Intermittent fever, 


- 


1 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


Indigestion, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




. 3 


3 


1 


2 


1 


- 


10 


Ivy poisoning, 
















4 


5 


- 


1 


1 


11 


Myalgia, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


_ 


1 


- 


- 


_ 


2 


Neuralgia, 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 




1 






3 


Otilis, . 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


4 


Otalgia, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 


_ 


2 


Purpura, 




1 






















1 


Pharyngitis, . 


- 


3 




1 


1 


2 


3 


1 




_ 


_ 


_ 


12 


Rheumatism, . 


- 


- 




- 


_ 


- 


1 


2 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


5 


Sweating, 


- 


- 




- 


- 


1 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


-1 


1 


Sprains, 




















1 


2 


_ 


3 


Skin diseases, 


5 


3 




3 


1 


4 


3 


- 


3 


1 


1 


2 ! 


27 


Sores, 


1 


- 




- 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


- 


2 


- 


12 


Sore eyes, 


1 


2 




1 


- 


2 




1 


1 


2 


_ 


_ 


10 


Tonsillitis, . 


2 


4 


11 


2 


1 


- 


12 


4 




1 


1 


3 


41 


Wounds, 


1 


2 




1 


- 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 ! 


15 


Not sick, 


13 


21 


~ 


15 


10 


17 


30 


2 

28 


2 


4 
25 


24 


3 

14 | 


11 


Totals, . 


18 


26 


241 


Number of visits, . 


13 


14 


14 


14 


11 


9 


11 


12 


9 


12 


9 


12 ' 


140 



Respectfully submitted, 

F. E. COREY, rhysician, 



Westborough, Sept. 30, 1889. 



84 PKIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



FARMER'S REPORT. 



To T. F. Chapin, Superintendent of the Lyman School for Boys. 

Sir : — In presenting this report, there is especial occasion 
to acknowledge that kind Providence who has ordered so 
long and favorable a season, and crowned our labor with 
so abundant success. 

With the single exception of potatoes, the crops have all 
been good, and the most of them unusually plentiful. The 
past season has been a trying one, owing to the great amount 
of rain, which rendered some of our lower fields unfit for 
use. 

Our labor has been much devoted to reclaiming and other- 
wise improving the land ; in building a new road from the 
barn to the main avenue D nn front of the superintendent's 
house ; in raising the main avenue fully three and a half 
feet, for a distance of twenty rods from the highway ; in 
grading, ditching and drain digging ; in paving the gutters 
along the main avenue, and in excavating the cesspools, 
which are now in process of construction. This work has 
been done mostly by the boys, under the supervision of 
their masters. 

Such work as ploughing, planting, cutting hay in the 
meadow, and other work on the farm, have been done with- 
out extra hired help. 

Our dairy has been greatly improved by the exchange of 
five of the poorest cows for seven young ones, making our 
whole number nineteen cows. 

The oxen purchased in the spring have proved better 
than the average. With the two yoke and our two pairs of 
horses, we have done all our work, such as hauling coal, 
freight, lumber and stone. 

The strawberries and blackberries have yielded abundantly, 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 85 

considering the amount of ground planted to small fruits. 
The raspberries are doing better than formerly, as indicated 
by the reports. Apples, though not as plenty, are of a much 
better quality, owing to the thorough pruning given the 
trees in the spring-time. 

The farm has been improved by laying down eight acres 
to grass, and breaking up some of the pasture land. 

The addition of a new silo, with a capacity of sixty tons, 
affords an excellent opportunity to increase and improve the 
dairy stock. 

In conclusion, I would gratefully mention the courtesy I 
have received at the hands of the masters of the family 
houses, and the cheerfulness and efficiency of the boys under 
their supervision, in doing whatever we have requested. 

The annexed schedule shows the production of the farm. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. J. DONOVAN. 

Westborough, Sept. 30, 1839. 



86 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Summary of Farm Account for Twelve Months, ending Sept. 

30, 1889. 



Dr. 
Live stock and farm implements, as appraised 
Sept. 30, 1888, 

Board, 

Farm tools, and repairs to same, 

Fertilizer, .... 

Grain and meal, 

Horse and cattle shoeing, 

Incidentals, .... 

Labor, boys', .... 

Live stock, . 

Ordinary repairs, 

Rent (Wilson farm, 1888), 

Seeds, 

Wages, pay-roll, 
Water, . . . 



$3,780 05 
229 44 
260 03 

89 65 
702 36 

86 36 

2 75 

480 04 

649 26 

72 12 
210 00 
101 41 
454 55 

20 00 



87,138 02 

Net gain for twelve months, 1,358 19 



f8,496 21 



Or. 

Farm produce, as appraised Sept. 30, 1888, 

Apples, 1\ bushels, . 

Asparagus, 55-i dozen bunches, 

Beans, shell, 28 quarts, . 

Beans, string, 58 bushels, 

Beef, 2,849 pounds, . 

Beet greens, 20| bushels, 

Beets, 181 bushels, . 

Blackberries, 602 quarts, . 

Cabbage, 656 heads, 

Cash for asparagus sold, 1\\ dozen, 

Cash for blackberries sold, 612 quarts, 

Cash for cabbage plants sold, 

Cash for calves sold, 6, . 

Cash for labor, 

Cash for onions, 2 bushels, old, 

Cash for pease, 2 bushels, 

Cash for pork, 559 pounds, 

Cash for raspberries, 114 quarts, 

Cash for service of stock, 

Cash for strawberries, 780 quarts, 

Cash for swill, .... 



$3,011 45 

5 00 

55 17 

1 40 

43 50 
196 57 

7 70 
9 50 

48 16 
32 30 

8 76 

44 67 
1 00 
5 75 

50 

1 40 

2 00 
29 95 
12 68 

2 00 

82 87 

5 75 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



87 



Cauliflower, 4f dozen, 

Celery, 900 heads, . 

Cherries, 17 quarts, . 

Corn fodder, 4 tous, 

Crab-apples, 1 bushel, 

Cucumbers, 215, 

Cucumbers for pickling, 5^ bushels 

Currants, 9 quarts, . 

Eggs, 106 dozen, 

Hay, 3i tons, . 

Hides, given in exchange for butchering, 

Labor for institution, men and teams, 

Lettuce, 431 dozen heads, 

Milk, 57,563 quarts, . 

Oats fodder, 2 tons, . 

Onions, 4^ bushels, . 

Parsnips and carrots, 16 bunches each, 

Pears, 3^ bushels, . 

Pease, 92 bushels, . 

Pork, 2,852 pounds, . 

Potatoes, 453 1 bushels, 

Poultry, 64 pounds, . 

Radishes, . . • . 

Raspberries, 367 quarts, 

Rhubarb, . 

Spinach, 8 bushels, . 

Squash, summer, 2,240 pounds, 

Squash, winter, 1,600 pounds, . 

Strawberries, 420 quarts, 

Sweet corn, 707 dozen ears, 

Tomatoes, 106| bushels, . 

Turnips, 41^ bushels, 

Veal, 87 pounds, . . . 



|8 


25 


54 


00 


2 


04 


20 00 


1 


00 


3 


66 


21 


00 


1 


08 


25 00 


63 


00 


12 


67 


1,678 00 


10 88 


1,872 


68 


10 


00 


3 30 


1 


60 






50 


117 


25 


192 44 


413 


15 


10 


62 


1 


00 


44 


04 


3 


00 


4 00 


11 


50 


16 


00 


54 


60 


106 


05 


83 


17 


30 


95 


8 


70 



;,496 21 



Produce of the Farm 



Apples, 30 barrels J 
Beans, 4 bushels, . 
Beets, table, 50 bushels 
Beets, cattle, 50 bushels 
Cabbage, 3,300 heads, 
Carrots, 70 bushels, 
Corn, on ears, 230 bush. 
Corn fodder, 74| tons, 
Fodder, 3| tons, . 
Hay, English, 68^ tons 



on Hand Oct. 
at School 



1, 1889, AND NOT DELIVERED 



$60 00 

8 00 

20 00 

6 00 

165 00 

17 50 

57 50 

298 00 

10 50 

1,233 00 



Ha}', meadow, 8 tons, . 
Onions, 60 bushels, 

Parsnips, 80 bushels, . 

Potatoes, 108 bushels, . 

Squash, 9,900 pounds, . 
Squash, cattle, 4,500 

pounds, 

Turnips, 225 bushels, . 



$48 00 
60 00 
40 00 
75 60 

123 75 

13 50 
33 75 

$2,270 10 



88 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



1 


Farm 


Sales. 


Asparagus, . 


$8 76 


Raspberries, . 


Blackberries, 


44 67 


Strawberries, 


Cabbage plants, . 


1 00 




Calves, . 


5 75 




Onions. . 


1 40 


Hay (crop of 


Pease, . 


2 00 




Pork, . 


29 95 





f 12 68 

82 87 


$189 08 
14 56 



203 64 



Bull, one, 


. §100 00 


Cows, nineteen, 


760 00 


Fowls, fourteen, . 


7 00 


Hogs, twenty, 


135 00 


Horse, " Major, Jr.," 


250 00 


Horse, "Jerry," . 


165 00 



Live Stock. 

Horses, one pair, bay, 
Horses, one pair, old, 
Oxen, two yoke, . 



$500 


00 


125 


00 


245 


00 



$2,287 00 



Farming implements, including wagons, machines, tools, etc., $1,571 89 



Produce on hand, 
Produce sold, . 
Produce consumed, 



Summary. 



Live stock, 

Agricultural implements, 



. $2,270 10 

189 08 

. 3,615 68 



$6,074 86 
2,287 00 
1,571 89 



$9,933 75 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



89 



SUMMARY 





Real Estate. 




Fifty-eight acres tillage, ... . $10,800 00 


Thirty-six acres pasturage, 




1,800 00 


Brady land, . 




1,300 00 


Willow Park land, .... 




1,500 00 


Wilson land, seventy-two acres, 


• 


4,000 00 


Buildings. 


Superintendent's house, $8,000 00 


" Theodore Lyman Hall, 11 








38,000 00 


" Hillside Cottage, 11 . 






. 


15,000 00 


"Maple Cottage, 11 






. 


3,500 00 


" Willow Park, 11 . 








5,600 00 


" Wayside Cottage, 11 . 






. 


5,500 00 


Chapel, 








. 3,700 00 


Farm barn and sheds, 








1,200 00 


Horse barn, 








2,000 00 


Willow Park hall, 








400 00 


Willow Park barn, 








100 00 


Coal sheds, . 








400 00 



$19,400 00 



83,400 00 



Personal Estate. 

Beds and bedding, inmates 1 , .... $2,39139 

Carriages and agricultural implements, . . 1,571 89 

Dry goods, 321 04 

Drugs, medicines and surgical instruments, . 300 00 

Fuel and oil 1,758 00 

Library, . 475 00 

Carried forward, $6,817 32 $102,800 00 



90 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Brought forward, $6,817 32 $102,800 00 

Live stock, 2,287 00 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . . 2,731 93 

Other furniture, inmates', 1,471 78 

Personal property superintendent's department, 7,429 86 

Provisions and groceries, 570 28 

Produce on hand, ...... 2,270 10 

Readv-made clothing, 1,865 34 



25,443 61 



Total, $128,243 61 

GEO. T. FAYERWEATHER, 
G. P. HEATH, 

Appraisers. 
A true copy. Attest : T. F. Chapin, Supt. 
Westborough, Sept. 30, 1889. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



91 



LIST OF SALAEIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



Theodore F. Chapin, superintendent, 

Mrs. T. F. Chapin, matron, 

Geo. F. Bullard, assistant superintendent, 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Howe, charge of family, 

Mr, and Mrs. J. A. Norton, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. I. T. Swift, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Robertson, charge of famil 

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Keith, charge of family. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Jones, charge of family, 

F. E. Corey, M.D., physician, . 

Miss Carrie Dana, teacher, 

Miss Emma F. Newton, teacher, 

Miss Bertha C. Leech, teacher, . 

Miss Flora E. Strout, teacher, . 

Miss Flora E. Loomis, teacher, . 

Miss Ella E. Glover, teacher, . 

M. E. Howard, teacher of printing 

Miss Mary E. Greeley, seamstress, 

Miss Mary Custer, nurse, . 

Mrs. Geo. F. Bullard, housekeeper, superintendent 

Miss Mabel B. Mitchell, assistant matron, 

Miss Mae E. Hartford, assistant matron, . 

Mrs. J. J. Donovan, assistant matron, . ■ 

Miss Lizzie J. Parkhurst, assistant matron, 

Mrs. B. F. McFarland, assistant matron, . 

Mrs. Edith Howard, assistant matron, 

J. W. Clark, engineer, .... 

Wm. H. Powers, carpenter, f 1.50 per day. 

J. H. Cummings, overseer, 

J. T. Perkins, steward, 

J. J. Donovan, farmer, 

B. F. McFarland, assistant farmer, 

Harlan M. Thompson, watchman, 



s house 



$1,800 00 


400 00 


500 00 


700 00 


800 00 


700 00 


700 00 


750 00 


700 00 


150 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


400 00 


250 00 


250 00 


300 00 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


200 00 


250 00 


900 00 


500 00 


400 00 


400 00 


250 00 


400 00 



92 



PEIMARY AND EEFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



C000C0HWQ0(NO5NiMC000O(MOCD(NiXiOCi(NOiMNTHM!Ma) 
ffl0585O)W05(0(MC0HOOO(NOHi0C5O)i0N00O»OrtOOi 

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d a> 

73 S 

d vj 

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d d d 

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1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — - No. 18. 



93 



tDiO(OOW^(oio-HHtONNl>HiO^OOO(MN^NH!DiNuOOiOOO 
H00HO'0i*NOO'0C0O(NHCOOCiOi0(NCiO00Q0C5OOWi0O 

NN(NONOOOOOCONCOO(N(Nr)lOO(NOCOiOC001HNiOO!00 

tH ,-h(NC<is<i,_|,_!,_i,_i CO ^f O CO NHCOH 


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GO 

co" 




















A -G 




fl - mp-------------- - - 

o po 

s -§ s 

5C|0US|0 oo|o Jo h|o Joolo loHo Jo |cuj|o |o o;o !o H© Ho 

(NW-+(N«CO(N(N»N!0<©N(N!M(M(NNMt>«00!0 e*|orH r-t Joh rH Jo 
1— 1 i— 1 i— It— 1 T-^rHi-HrH r— ' H« |M '« 






1 


modelling, 
dent's house, 





i 

; and 

urse, 

in ten 




p C " ^ 

3 S 3 . K . . O 


. 3 


Teacher of pri 

Teacher of dr? 

Housekeeper a 

Housekeeper, 

Housekeeper, 

Nurse, 

Seamstress, 

Assistant matr 

Engineer, 
Carpenter, 
Overseer, 
Steward, . 
Farmer, . 


Assistant farm 
Watchman, 
Supply officer, 

U (4 




















#. ■+j' 




Wm. F. Macy, 
M. E Howard, 
Miss Lizzie M. Sanborn 
Mrs. I. T. Swift, . 
Mrs. S. 0. Woodard, 
Mrs. Geo. F. Bullard, 
Miss Mary Custer, 
Miss Mary Greeley, 
Miss Mabel B. Mitchell, 
Miss Mae E. Hartford, 
Mrs. J. J. Donovan, 
Miss Lizzie J. Parkhurs 
Mrs. B. F. McFarland, 
Mrs. Edith Howard, 
J.W.Clark, . 
Wm. H. Powers, . 
J. H. Cummings, . 
J. T. Perkins, 
I. T. Swift, . 
S. 0. Woodard, . 
J. J. Donovan, 
B. F. McFarland, . 
Harlan M. Thompson, 
Mrs. John T. Perkins, 
Mrs. Chas. H. Howard, . 
Miss Jennie E. Perry, . 
Miss Mary A. Johnson, . 
Miss Add'ie M. Tirrell, 

B. E. Robertson, . 

C. I. W. Robinson, 

Wm. J. Cunningham, . 

• 



94 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 



Schedule of Persons temporarily employed at the Lyman School for 
Boys within the Year ending Sept. 30, 1889. 



Ministers, 




f 265 00 


0. B. Onthank, 




Mattress maker, . 


100 81 


E. J. Garfield, . 




« (4 


96 31 


Geo. E. Jordan, 




Carpenter, . 


88 87 


John A. Brown, 




ii 


53 00 


W. A. Curtis, . 




" 


45 87 


Wm. Wilson, . 




" 


45 87 


Geo. T. Fayerweather, . 




Appraiser, . 


36 00 


H. L. Adams, . 




Carpenter, . 


24 50 


Walcott Brown, 




u 


24 50 


C. I. W. Robinson, . 




Painter, 


19 75 


S. C. Schmucker, 




Special instructor, 


17 00 


G. P. Heath, . . ' . 




Appraiser, . 


15 00 


Frank Smith, . 




Temporary watchman, 


10 96 


Anson Warren, 




Labor with team, 


10 80 


B. G. Northrop, 




Lecturer, 


10 00 


Christmas speakers, 




. 


9 00 


J. H. Brown, . 




Carpenter, . . . 


7 50 


Magic lantern entertainment, 




..... 


6 50 


Miss Leslie, 




Elocutionist, 


5 00 


Notary public, 






1 25 


Dr. E. A. Clarke, .... 


Medical service, . 


1 00 






$894 49 



SUPE RINTENDENTS. 



Date of 




Date of 






NAMES. 




Appointment. 




Retirement. 




1848, 


William R. Lincoln, 


1853. 




1853, 


James M. Talcott, 








1857. 




1857, 


William E. Starr, 








1861. 




1861, 


Joseph A. Allen, . 








1867. 




1867, 


Orville K. Hutchinson, 








1868. 




1868, 


Benjamin Evans, . 








May, 1873. 


May, 


1873, 


Allen G. Shepherd, 








Aug., 1878. 


Aug., 


1878, 


Luther H. Sheldon, 








Dec, 1880. 


Dec, 


1880, 


Edmund T. Dooley, 








Oct., 1881. 


Oct., 


1881, 


Joseph A. Allen, . 








April, 1885. 


July, 


1885, 


Henry E. Swan, . 








July, 1888. 


July, 


•1888, 


Theodore F. Chapin, . 








Still in office. 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



95 



TEUSTEES 



Names, Residences, Commissions and Retirement of the Trustees 
of the State Reform School, from the Commencement to the 
Present Time. 



Date of 






Date of 




NAMES. 


Residence. 




Commission. 






Retirement. 


1847, 


Nahum Fisher,* . 


Westborough, . 


1849 


1847, 


John W. Graves, 




Lowell, . 


1849 


1847, 


Samuel Williston, 




Easthampton, . 


1853 


1847, 


Thomas A. Green,* 




New Bedford, , 


1860 


1847, 


Otis Adams,* 




' Grafton, . 


1851 


1847, 


George Denney,* 




Westborough, . 


1851 


1847, 


William P. Andrews,* 


Boston, . 


1851 


1849, 


William Livingston,* 


Lowell, . 


1851 


1849, 


Russell A. Gibbs,* 


Lanesborough, 


1853 


1851, 


George H. Kuhn, 




Boston, . 


1855 


1851, 


J. B. French,* . 




Lowell, . 


1854 


1851, 


Daniel H. Forbes, 




Westborough, . 


1854 


1851, 


Edward B. Bigelow,* 




Grafton, . 


1855 


1853, 


J. W. H. Page,* . 




New Bedford, . 


1856 


1853, 


Harvey Dodge, . 




Sutton, 


1867 


1854, 


G. Howland Shaw,* 




Boston, 


1856 


1854, 


Henry W. Cushman,* 




Bernardston, . 


1860 


1855, 


Albert H. Nelson,* 




Woburn, . 


1855 


1855, 


Joseph A. Fitch, 




Hopkinton, 


1858 


1855, 


Parley Hammond, 




Worcester, 


1860 


1856, 


Simon Brown, . 




Concord, . 


1860 


1856, 


John A. Fayerweathe: 


L") 


Westborough, . 


1859 


1857, 


Josiah H. Temple, 




Framingham, . 


1860 


1858, 


Judson S. Brown, 




Fitchburg, 


1860 


1859, 


Theodore Lyman, 




Brookline, 


1860 


1860, 


George C. Davis,* 




Northborough, 


1873 


1860, 


Carver Hotchkiss, 




Shelburne, 


1863 


1860, 


Julius A. Palmer, 




Boston, 


1862 


1860, 


Henry Chickering, 




Pittsfield, . 


1869 


1860, 


George W. Bentley, 




Worcester, 


1861 


1860, 


Alden Leland, . 




Holliston, 


1864 


1861, 


Pliny Nickerson, 




Boston, 


1868 


1861, 


Samuel G. Howe,* 




Boston, 


1863 


1862, 


Benjamin Boynton,* 




Westborough, . 


1864 


1863, 


J. H. Stephenson, 




Boston, . 


1866 


1863, 


John Ayres, 




Charlestown, . 


1867 



♦Deceased. 



96 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 



Names, Residences, etc., of Trustees — Concluded. 



Date of 






Date of 




NAMES, 


Residence. 




Commission. 






Retirement. 


1864, 


A. E. Goodnow, . 


Worcester, 


1874 


1864, 


Isaac Ames, 




Haverhill, 


1865 


1865, 


Jones S. Davis, . 




Holyoke, . 


186S 


1866, 


Joseph A. Pond,* 




Brighton, 


1867 


1867, 


Stephen G. Deblois, 




Boston, 


1878 


1868, 


John Ayres, 




Medford, . 


1874 


1868, 


Harmon Hall, 




Saugus, . 


1871 


1868, 


L. L. Goodspeed, 




Bridge water, . 


1872 


1869, 


E. A. Hubbard, . 




Springfield, 


1877 


1871, 


Lucius W. Pond, 




Worcester, 


1875 


1871, 


John W. Olmstead, 




Boston, 


1873 


1872, 


Moses H. Sargent, 




Newton, . 


1877 


1873, 


A. S. Woodworth, 




Boston, 


1876 


1873, 


Edwin B. Harvey, 




Westborough, . 


1878 


1874, 


W. H. Baldwin, . 




Boston, 


1876 


1875, 


John 4 L. Cummings, 




Ashburnham, . 


1879 


1876, 


Jackson B. Swett, 




Haverhill, 


1878 


1877, 


Samuel R. Hey wood, 




Worcester, 


1879 


1877, 


Milo Hildreth, . 




Northborough, 


1879 


1878, 


Lyman Belknap,* 




Westborough, . 


1879 


1878, 


Franklin Williams,* 




Boston, . 


1879 


1878, 


Robert Couch, . 




Newburyport, . 


1879 


1879, 


John T. Clark, . 




Boston, . 


1879 


1879, 


M. J. Flatley, . 




Boston, . 


1881 


1879, 


Adelaide A. Calkins, 




Springfield, 


1880 


1879, 


Lyman Belknap, 




Westborough, . 


1884 


1879, 


Anne B. Richardson, 




Lowell, . 


1886 


1879, 


Milo Hildreth, . 




Northborough, 


Still in office. 


1879, 


George W. Johnson, 




Brookfield; 


1887 


1879, 


Samuel R. Heywood, 




Worcester, 


1888 


1880, 


Elizabeth C. Putnam, 




Boston, 


Still in office 


1881, 


Thomas D wight, 




Boston, . 


1884 


1884, 


M. H. Walker, . 




Westborough, . 


Still in office. 


1884, 


J. J. O'Connor,* 




Holyoke, . 




1886, 


Elizabeth G. Evans, 




Boston, 




1887, 


Chas. L. Gardner, 




Palmer, . 




1888, 


H. C. Greeley, . 




Clinton, . 




1889, 


M. J. Sullivan, . 




Chicopee, 





* Deceased. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



State Industkial School foe Gikls. 



LANCASTER 



SUPERINTENDENT'S BE PORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

I submit to you the report for the year ending Sept. 30, 
1889. The school during the year has been larger than 
usual, as a greater number have been committed than for 
several years. The girls have been more successful at 
places, and fewer have been returned for misconduct. We 
are trying to have the defects of their early education sup- 
plied by industrial, moral and mental training. 

Nearly all of the girls are enthusiastic to learn, especially 
cooking, canning fruit, pickling, etc. We are fortunate in 
having teachers in this department who take the utmost care 
that girls shall be thoroughly instructed before leaving the 
school. And not only in this department have we faithful 
workers, but in all the departments, unitedly working with 
the same object in view ; that is, for the uplifting of these 
wayward girls, and to fit them to be self-supporting in the 
future. 

The demand for girls is greater than we can supply, yet 
we have placed out seventy-nine this year, who, thus far, 
are doing well. 

The following statistics will show what the work of the 
school has been, and what has been accomplished. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L, L. BRACKETT, 

Superintendent . 



100 



PEIMARY AND EEFOKM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



STATISTICS 



During this year there have been within the school for more or 

less time, 

In the school Sept. 30, 1888, 63 

Returned to the school, having been placed out in 

former years, . . 28 

New commitments, 73 

Total in the school — 



164 



161 



The following disposition was made of these girls : — 



In the school Sept. 30, 1889, 
In place, . 
With friends, . 
Married, . 
Almshouse, 
Reformatory Prison, 
Discharged, 
Total, . 



During the year there ha\ 



e been sent out from the school, 



87 
54 
9 
2 
5 
1 
6 



There have been returned (including the 28 from former years 1 
placing), 
For illness, 



from 



place, 



change of place, . 

unsatisfactory conduct, 

theft, . 

serious immorality, 
Returned from elopement 
Transferred from prison, 
Total returned. 



Total in custody Sept. 30, 1888, 
Committed this year, 

Total in custody during the year {including the 164 
already accounted for) , . 



164 

*79 

39 



39 



225 
73 

— 298 



* Of the 79 sent out, there were placed once, 
" " twice, 

" " three times, 



64 

14 

1 



70 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



101 



Of whom there have attained their majority, . 

Discharged by vote for good conduct, 

" " as nearly twenty-one years of age, 

" " as unfit subjects for school, 

" " as defective in intellect, . 

Died, 



Total who have been discharged, come of age, or died 

At work in families, 

At work elsewhere, 

On probation with friends, .... 
Married in former years, not yet twenty-one, . 

Married this year, 

Total self-supporting, .... 



In the school Sept. 30, 1889, .... 

In almshouse, 

Transferred to Reformatory Prison in former year 
Transferred to prison this year, 

Total still supported by State, . 

Ran away from place in former years, not yet recovered, 
Ran away from place this year, 

Total still in care of trustees, ...... 



23 

4 
2 

5 
1 

2 



97 
1 

24 
22 



37 



37 



15." 



87 




5 




4 




1 




— 


97 


8 




3 




— 


11 




261 



Of those committed this year — 



67 could read and write. 
1 " " not write. 

5 " neither read nor write. 



34 attended church regularly 
37 attended church seldom. 
2 never attended church. 



4 were 12 years of age. 


25 were 15 years of age 


11 " 13 " 


19 were 16 years of age 


14 " 14 " 


Average age, 14.6 years. 


43 born in Massachusetts. 


4 born in Nova Scotia. 


3 " New Hampshire. 


2 " Canada. 


1 " Maine. 


6 " England. 


1 " South Carolina. 


1 " Denmark. 


1 " Rhode Island. 


1 " Germany. 


1 " Connecticut. 


1 " Portugal. 


1 " New York. 


1 " Scotland. 


2 " Tennessee. 


4 " Ireland. 


19 American parentage. 


5 French parentage. 


8 colored American parentage. 


1 Portuguese " 


27 Irish parentage. 


2 German " 


6 English 


1 Italian " 


3 Scotch 


1 Danish " 



102 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Stubbornness, 
Larceny, . 
Lewdness, 
Vagrancy, 
Drunkenness, 



43 

14 

2 

5 

2 



Incest, 
Fornication, 
Night-walking, 
Incendiarism, , 



Orphans, . 

One parent living, 



11 I Both parents living, 

29 I 



Current expenses, ...... 

Cash received and returned to State treasury, 



$19,325 80 
622 02 



$18,703 78 



Average number of inmates, 78.6. Dividing the current ex- 
penses by average number of inmates gives an annual 
cost of $245 87 

Weekly cost per capita, 4 71 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY. 



Real Estate. 



Chapel, 
House No. 1, 

No. 2, 

No. 4, 

No. 5, 

Superintendent's house, 
Store-room, 
Farm-house and barn, 
Large barn and addition, 
Silo, . 
Storehouse, 
Old barn, . 
Wood-house, 
Ice-house, 
Storehouse No. 3, 
Piggery, . 
Reservoir house, 
New hen-house, 
Carriage shed, . 
Farm, 176 acres, 
Wood lot, 10 acres, 
Storm windows, 



$3,000 00 




8,250 00 




8,500 00 




9,000 00 




3,000 00 




3,000 00 




300 00 




1,500 00 




7,000 00 




400 00 




450 00 




150 00 




100 00 




100 00 




25 00 




100 00 




100 00 




40 00 




150 00 




7,500 00 




200 00 




48 60 




$52,913 


60 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



103 



Personal Property. 



Property in No. 1, . 

No. 2, . 

No. 4, . 

No. 5, . 
Superintendent's house, 
Chapel and library, . 
Provisions and groceries 
Dry goods, 

Crockery and hardware, 
Paint, 
Medicine, . 
Stationery, 
Fuel, 

Valuation of stock, . 
Valuation of horses, 
Tools and carriages, 
Produce of farm on hand, 



$1,152 


39 


1,153 51 


1,490 


53 


778 82 


974 


32 


650 


00 


751 


59 


1,020 06 


376 


24 


36 


00 


15 


00 


36 


28 


1,557 


50 


1,520 00 


700 


00 


1,800 


75 


3,031 


11 




|17,044 10 



ANDREW J. BANCROFT, 
HENRY F. HOSMER, 

Appraisers. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 

Oct. 7, 1889. 
Worcester, ss. 

Then personally appeared the above-named Andrew J. Bancroft and Henry F. 
Hosmer, and made oath that the foregoing inventory by them made is just and true, 
according to their best judgment. 

Before me, 

GEO. W. HOWE, 

Justice of the Peace. 



104 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



FAKMER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

In compliance with the request of the State auditor, I 
submit to you the farm account, together with the financial 
statement of the State Industrial School for Girls, for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1889. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. C. BRACKETT, 

Farmer and Steward. 



Summary of Farm Account. 
Dr. 
To live stock, as per inventory, .... $1,520 00 

To horses, as per inventory, 700 00 

To tools and carriages, 1,875 00 



Net gain during the year, 



To labor, . 
grain, . 

black smithing, 
barrels, 
lumber, 
barley, 
cows, . 
pasturing, 
making cider, 
hardware and tools, 
nursery stock, 
manure, 

seeds and plants, 
grass, . 
barbed wire, 



Br. 



$1,141 


23 


924 65 


55 


50 


60 


50 


9 


71 


3 


50 


158 


50 


46 


55 


19 


00 


102 


90 


33 00 


205 34 


31 


73 


33 


00 


17 


49 



$4,095 00 
234 25 



$2,842 60 



1889.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



105 



Cr. 



By farm products of 1888, as per inventory, . 




$2,717 14 




By farm products of 1889, as per inventory, 


. 3,031 11 




Net gain during the year, 






$313^97 




Milk, 34,899 quarts, 


. $338 42 




Pork, 3,633 pounds, . 










243 77 




Beef, 6,487 pounds, . 










522 56 




Sweet corn, 169 bushels, . 










169 00 




Rowen, 1 ton, . 










12 00 




Poultry, 35 pounds, . 










5 60 




Asparagus, 










20 00 




Cabbages, 100 heads, 










10 00 




Squash, 300 pounds, 










4 50 




String beans, 13 bushels, 










13 00 




Pease, 21 bushels, . 










31 50 




Turnips, 7 bushels, . 










1 75 




Tomatoes, 75 bushels, 










37 50 




Lettuce, .... 










12 00 




Rhubarb, .... 










15 00 




Berries, 100 quarts, . 










15 00 




Cucumbers, 20 bushels, . 










24 00 




Eggs, 410 dozen, 










90 64 




Ice, 










100 00 




Potatoes, 62 bushels, 










62 00 




Pears, 6 bushels, 










6 00 




Hay, 1 ton, 










6 00 




Beets, 70 bushels, . 










27 00 




Radishes, 150 bunches, . 










10 00 




Bedding, 40 tons, 38 pounds, 










229 63 




Onions, 2 bushels, . 










2 00 




Corn fodder, 15 tons, 










105 00 




Muck, 54 loads, 










54 00 




Calves sold, 












382 78 




Pigs sold, . 












48 25 




Service of animal, 












7 00 




Apples sold, 












56 20 




Potatoes sold, . 












8 50 




Fat hog sold, . 












17 85 




Produce sold, . 












56 99 




Keeping horse for use of school, 








150 00 






$2,895 44 
313 97 


Net gain during 


the year, 













$3,209 41 



106 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Produce souvand Receipts sent to State Treasurer. 

1888-1889. 



Calves, . 


$382 78 


Fat hog, 


Pigs, . 


48 25 


Discount on A. C. Stock- 


Service of animal, 


7 00 


ing bill, 


Board, . 


100 00 




Apples, . 


56 20 




Potatoes, 


8 50 





817 85 



1 44 



$622 02 



Produce consumed Sept. 30, 1889. 



Milk, 34,899 quarts, 
Pork, 3,633 pounds, 
Beef, 6,487 pounds, 
Sweet corn, 169 bushels 
Rowen, 1 ton, 
Poultry, 35 pounds, 
Asparagus, . 
Cabbage, 100 heads, 
Squash, 300 pounds, 
String beans, 13 bushels 
Pease, 21 bushels, 
Turnips, 7 bushels, 
Tomatoes, 75 bushels, 
Lettuce, 
Rhubarb, 
Berries, 100 quarts, 



. $338 42 


243 


77 


522 


50 


169 


00 


12 


00 


5 


60 


20 


00 


10 00 


4 


50 


13 


00 


31 50 


1 


75 


37 


50 


12 00 


15 


00 


15 


00 



Cucumbers, 20 bushels 
Eggs, 410 dozen, . 
Ice, 

Potatoes, 62 bushels, 
Pears, 6 bushels, . 
Hay, 1 ton, . 
Beets, 70 bushels, . 
Radishes, 150 bunches, 
Bedding, 40 tons, 38 

pounds, 
Onions, 2 bushels, 
Fodder corn, 15 tons 
Muck, 54 loads, . 



$24 00 


90 


64 


100 


00 


62 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


27 


00 


10 


00 


5 

229 


63 


2 


00 


105 


00 


54 00 



$2,167 87 



Produce on Hand Oct. 1, 1889. 



English hay, 85 tons, 
Rye straw, 4 tons, 
Ensilage, 95 tons, . 
Mangels, 20 tons, . 
Barley fodder, 12 tons, 
Corn fodder, . 
Parsnips, 5 bushels, 
Carrots, 10 bushels, 
Beets, 80 bushels, . 
Squash, 500 pounds, 
Potatoes, 300 bushels, 
Beans, 50 bushels, 
Grass seeds, . 
Pop corn, 20 bushels, 
Turnijos, 60 bushels, 



$1,360 


00 


50 


00 


475 


00 


200 00 


72 


00 


10 


00 


2 


50 


5 


00 


40 


00 


7 


50 


100 


00 


100 00 


4 


75 


24 00 


15 


00 



Cabbages, 861 heads, 
Celery, 345 heads, 
Seed sweet corn, 10 

bushels, 
Onions, 15 bushels, 
Tomatoes, 75 bushels, 
Pease, 3 bushels seed, 
Pickles, salt, 2 barrels 
Vinegar stock, 1,200 

gallons, 
Apples, 5 barrels, . 
Manure, 45 cords, 
Lumber, 



$51 Q6 
20 70 

15 00 

15 00 

20 00 

5 00 

8 00 

120 00 

5 00 

270 00 

35 00 

,031 11 



1889.] 






PUBLIC 


DOCUMENT - 


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18. 




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108 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 















•AVta^oojo 
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October, . 
November, 
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1889. 

January, . 

February, . 

March, 

April, : 

May, 

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September, 





1889,] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



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110 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Pay-roll of Persons employed at the State Industrial School for the 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1889. 





NAMES. 


Nature of Service. 


Time. 


Compen- 
; sation. 


L. L. Bracket!, 


Superintendent, . 


1 year, 


|999 96 


N. C. Bracket*, 




Farmer and steward, . 


1 " . 


650 04 


C. J. Bean, 




Matron, 


11 months 10 days, . 


330 35 


R. M. Rice, . 




a 




11 " 16 « 


334 71 


S. E. Stowe, . 




(i 




11 " 22 " 


341 86 


H. T. Spalding, 




" . 




8 " 26 " 


257 76 


E. P. Saunders, 




" 




12 days, . 


11 51 


E. M. Hamlin, 




Sub. matron, 




1 month 29 days, . 


56 96 


A. J. Wheeler, 




(i 




30 days, . 


28 72 


H. A Woodward, 




.< 




2 months 10 days, . 


67 89 


L. M. Holt, . 




Vacancy officer, 




15 days, 


13 35 


H. A. Woodward, 




a <c 




8 months 4 days, . 


204 21 


A. L. Brackett, 




Sub. officer, . 




3 « 5 " . 


78 87 


M. Middlemas, 




Teacher, 




1 " 18 " 


39 80 


L. B. Barton, . 




tt 




11 " 13 " 


285 68 


E. B. Eames, . 




a 




11 " 9 " . 


2S2 39 


A. M. Fellows, 




« 




8 " 1 " 


200 13 


M. K. Verrill, 




" 




3 " 11 <« 


84 52 


C. M. Douglass, 




u 




2 " 15 " 


62 32 


B. St. J. Pearson, 




Sub. teacher, 




61 days, . 


49 59 


A. M. Hadley, 




<i a 




1 month 5 days, . 


29 16 


A. L. Brackett, 




a a 




11 days, 


9 04 


H. A. Woodward, 




" 




14 " . 


11 51 


M. Torry, 




Housekeeper, 




1 year, . 


300 00 


M. J. Mclntire, 




<( 




1 " . . . 


300 00 


K. E. Saunders, 




<< 




11 months 8 days, . 


281 57 


S. R. Houghton, . 




<( 




4 " 7i" 


106 16 


C. Barton, 




u 




1 " 24 " 


44 73 


S. J. Odion, . 




" 




2 " 1 " • . 


50 82 


C A. Rand, . 




" 




4 •« 26 " 


121 35 


I. E. Smart, . 




" 




9 "... . 


225 00 


A. M. Hadley, 




■ Sub. housekeeper, 




13i days, . 


12 74 


H. A. Woodward, . 




a a 




14 " 


11 50 


M. Y. O'Callaghan 




Physician, . 




1 year, . 


200 04 


C. B. Hamlin, 




Foreman, 




1 " ... 


540 00 


J. C. Rice, 




Laborer, 




11 months 16 days, . 


298 98 


N. 0. Mclntire, 




" 




9 " 18 " 


341 93 


F. M. Sampson, 




u 




23 days, . 


28 06 


D. B. Scott, . 




Clergyman, . 






10 00 


J. C. Duncan, 




" . . 






10.00 










$7,313 21 



1889.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. Ill 



PHYSICIAN'S KEPOKT. 



To the Trustees of the Lancaster State Industrial School. 

I hereby submit my fifth annual report for the year ending 
Sept. 30, 1889. 

During this year we have had two serious cases of illness ; 
one of peritonitis, the other of long-continued heart failure. 
The former made a perfect recovery, and is now out at 
service ; the latter is so much better as to be one of the 
most trusted little workers the matron of House No. 4 has 
among her girls. There have been three cases of specific 
disease ; these have yielded to treatment. 

Two of our girls have come back to us in a pregnant 
condition. One of these is now at the almshouse in Tewks- 
bury, the other married in Boston. 

Two new girls have been committed, suffering from 
chronic lung trouble. One has improved steadily since her 
entrance ; but the other fails daily, and this month will have 
to be sent to some hospital where she can obtain the comforts 
needed in her weakened condition. 

One of the older girls, a consumptive for the past three 
years, is sinking rapidly. For the past two months she has 
been boarding at the home of one of our former house- 
keepers, where every attention is given her. 

The good seed sown by the present superintendent and 
her efficient corps of assistants nowhere bears better fruit 
than in the improved health of the girls. Hysteria, so 
prevalent four years ago, is now unknown, while feigned 
diseases are things of the past. A goodly number of our 
girls come to us weakened physically as well as morally, by 
improper living. Unless active disease is present, no medi- 



112 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct.'89. 

cines are given ; but simple diet, fresh air, frequent bathing, 
vigorous exercise in the open air, regular hours for sleep and 
work, — these, with a just recognition of every upward step 
in the moral plane, result most beneficially. 

Few visitors fail to notice the bright eyes, ruddy cheeks, 
and buoyant, elastic step that mark so strongly the almost 
perfect health of the majority of our girls. 

Respectfully, 



Worcester, October, 1889. 



MARY Y. O'CALLAGHAN, 

Visiting Physician. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT. No. 18. 



TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



State Primary and Reform Schools, 



WITH THE 



ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE RESIDENT OFFICERS, 



For the Year ending Sept. 30, 1890. 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1891. 
as 



Cnmmnntoiijj of ^lassarfeits^tls. 



TKUSTEES' REPORT. 



STATE PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. 

To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools 
respectfully present their Twelfth Annual Report of the 
three institutions committed to their care. 

STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL AT MONSON. 

On Sept. 30, 1889, there were 328 children in the State 
Primary School. To this number there have been added 
during the year 145 boys and 71 girls, making, with those 
returned from placing, a total of 601 children, who have 
been maintained in the institution, for longer or shorter 
periods during the year, at a weekly per capita cost of 
$2.09. There have been at board 59 children, the average 
number being 49 ; average cost, $2.02, which includes the 
maintenance, clothing, medical care and schooling. There 
are now 336 children in the school and 55 at board. 

Throughout the community, in private as well as in public 
charities, the question is raised, " Why should this or that 
child be growing up in an institution?" and the burden 
falls upon the guardian or custodian of the child to show 
good cause for its being there. It is a matter of public 
interest to consider for what cause so large a number of 
children is to be found at Monson. 



4 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

There are in this institution : — 

First. Children who have been transferred directly from 
the State Almshouse. 

Second. Dependent children who have been placed in 
the care of the State Board of Lunacy and Charity. 

Third. Neglected children who have been committed to 
the custody of the State Board by decree of the courts. 

Fourth, Juvenile offenders, committed to the custody 
of the State Board with the proviso that in case they later 
prove unmanageable they may be transferred, boys to the 
Lyman School, girls to the State Industrial School. 

Of the first named there are a few who have been trans- 
ferred from the almshouse accompanied by their mothers ; 
these women being employed in the laundry, sewing room 
and elsewhere. This is allowed in order to preserve the tie 
between mother and child, and with a view to future provi- 
sion by the mother for the child. Any child in the State 
Primary School may be discharged by vote of the State 
Board, whether committed to the custody of that Board, or 
held upon the, same terms as inmates of the State Almshouse. 

Neglected children and juvenile offenders may be with- 
drawn at any time by order of the said Board, although by 
courtesy the superintendent of the school is consulted 
as to the fitness of the child for the proposed home or 
place. 

The juvenile offenders who are allowed to share the bene- 
fits of this school are selected by the State Board's agents 
at the time of the trial, as properly belonging rather with 
neglected children than with those who need a course of 
restraint and reformatory discipline. While the technical 
offences may be of the same description as those upon which 
boys are sent to the Lyman School, the age of these boys 
is found to be nine years, ten years, and occasionally thirteen 
years ; and the offences, thieving, vagrancy, sometimes 
breaking and entering ; the records in the majority of cases 
showing that the home has been bad, the child neglected 
and often of poor stock, with one or both parents in penal 
institutions. When distributed through the classes of the 
excellent graded schools, these children are in no way to be 
distinguished from the simply dependent, except that, as a 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 5 

rule, they are quicker-witted. The difficulty arises when 
they are placed out in farmers' families, and the utmost 
discrimination is needed in deciding upon the proper time 
and place for making a trial of their fitness for self-support. 
Among all these classes, but especially among the depen- 
dent and neglected, are many who are so defective in body 
or mind as to need the shelter and care of the hospital, while 
in some instances they can take part in the schools and in 
light work about the premises. The blind and deaf can and 
do become self-supporting, but the defective in intellect 
should be protected from their own inconsequent acts and 
from evil companions. 

The fact then remains that while the State Board, through 
its visiting agency, offers every possible facility for placing 
children in private families, there are still found to be cer- 
tain limitations : first, as to the number of families suitable 
to receive children who need careful management ; second, 
as to the capacity and good- will of the child who is to be 
placed. 

For those who for good cause must remain in the school 
there is ample opportunity to improve, as will be shown in 
detail by the reports of the superintendent and teachers. In 
addition to the common branches of study, there have been 
weekly practice for the boys in the carpenters' shop, with 
preliminary lessons in clay moulding and other adaptations 
of the kindergarten system, to the intermediate classes of 
both boys and girls. The teacher of manual training has 
also given instruction in mechanical drawing and military 
drill. The officers have worked with untiring zeal for the 
good of the cjaildren. 

There is little or no opportunity for the girls to learn to 
cook, or to acquire skill in the details of household work. 
The trustees have refrained from asking for means to give 
these branches of instruction, because they believe that girls 
who come into the care of the State simply on account of 
neglect or of poverty, can be and should be placed as early 
as possible in private families. 

It is fortunate for the treasury of the Commonwealth that 
along with the general demand for various improvements in 
our public charitable institutions there has been developed 



6 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

a policy which tends to diminish the proportion of child 
paupers as compared with the increasing number of the poor 
and dependent classes in our cities and towns. The board- 
ing-out system adopted as an experiment about ten years 
ago, has relieved the Monson school of the support of more 
than four hundred children who would otherwise have come 
there, and has unquestionably* served to relieve the State of 
the burden of their support at an earlier age than would have 
been possible if they had been brought up in. the institu- 
tion. 

The following statement, concerning children between three 
and ten years of age, by permission of the State Board is 
here presented : — 

First child placed at board in January, 1881. 

Total number boarded to date, Sept. 30, 1890, . . .446 
Of these, 

Returned to State Primary School, . . . .13 

Died, 8 

Placed in free homes, including 40 legally adopted, . 153 

Otherwise provided for, 3 

Discharged to friends, 56 

Remaining at board, 213 

The larger number of these have been maintained from the 
appropriation in the hands of the State Board. The number 
boarded from the appropriation held by the trustees has been 
limited this year by want of funds, and the sum of six thou- 
sand dollars is respectfully requested for the ensuing year. 

A small sum will be required to complete the coal shed and 
to fence in the lot purchased this year. A somewhat larger 
amount will be required in order to reorganize the water 
supply according to suggestions given in full in the report of 
the superintendent, on page 31. 

Above all, the attention of the Legislature is called to the 
necessity for securing better sanitary conditions than now 
exist in this institution. The prevalence of certain diseases, 
which was once accepted as a matter of course, is in these 
days subjected to careful investigation with a view to the dis- 
covery of some latent cause. During the past nine months 
there have occurred seven cases of recognized diphtheria, 
which, without having proved fatal, have caused the children 



1890. ] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 7 

much suffering, and the trustees and officers much anxiety,* 
besides interfering with admission and with placing out. 
In order to prevent the spread of the disease, as in 1883, 
trained nurses have been employed to care for patients in the 
isolating hospital, at a cost of over one hundred and fifty 
dollars. The disease has developed in nearly every case 
among the young children, who sleep in that part of the 
building where the old almshouse hospital was situated from 
1856 until the separate hospital was erected. 

While it is scarcely possible to check the spread of con- 
tagious diseases in the crowded and filthy districts where 
the poor congregate, there is no excuse for negligence on 
the part of a board of trustees to whose care young children 
are entrusted for safe-keeping and improvement. Under 
such circumstances negligence becomes a crime. In a well- 
arranged institution contagious diseases may occasionally 
appear but are speedily expelled. No pains should be spared 
in making the present building secure against danger of 
infection, and, if necessary, in erecting a separate set of dor- 
mitories for children of an age at which they are peculiarly 
liable to contract contagious diseases. 

The attention of the State Board of Health has been called 
to the matter, and the trustees are awaiting advice as to the 
best way of anticipating, and, if possible, preventing, such 
frequent recurrence of diphtheria. 

By permission of the Secretary of State, the report of the 
State Board of Health, received October 25, is appended, 
and will indicate the nature of the changes, for which an 
appropriation will be asked. 

Office of State Board of Health, 

13 Beacon Street, October, 1890. 

To the Trustees of the State Primary School. 

Gentlemen:— In reply to your letter of Sept. 12, 1890, requesting 
the advice of the State Board of Health as to the best means of prevent- 
ing the too frequent occurrence of diphtheria at the State Primary 
School, I have the honor to state that the matter has been submitted to 
the Board, and, in compliance with the request, several visits have been 

* Since preparing the above report, three fresh cases have appeared. 



8 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

made to the school, for the purpose of ascertaining the conditions under 
which diphtheria has prevailed there. 

Cases have occurred in February, March, April, May, August and 
October, 1890, in the school and its immediate neighborhood, one case 
having occurred in the family of the painter, living but a short distance 
outside the yard. This child attended school during the day in the 
institution. The cases 'that have occurred point very strongly and 
significantly to the second-story ward, occupied by the little children 
from two to five years of age, as the centre of infection. Some four or 
five cases have occurred among children occupying this ward ; and, 
among' those who were taken ill in the third-story wards, one was a 
boy who eats and plays in the second-story ward with the little children, 
and another (the last one taken ill) is that of a girl who does work in 
the daytime in the second-story ward occupied by the little children. 

In reviewing the history of the school for the past ten years, we find 
that there have been eleven deaths from diphtheria and croup, as 
f ollows : — 

In October, 1880, one girl of six years. 
April, 1881, one boy of six years. 
November, 1882, one girl of three and a half years. 
December, 1882, one girl of six years and eight months. 
December, 1882, one girl of three and a half years. 

December, 1882, one girl of years. 

December, 1882, one boy of five and a half years. 
December, 1882, one boy of seven years. 
March, 1885, one boy of one year. 

April, 1890, a boy of six years at painter's house outside the yard. 
Attended day school only. 

These eleven cases, or about one death annually, are all of the 
recorded deaths from diphtheria and croup which have occurred in ten 
years. Comparing this with the total population outside the institution, 
there were in Massachusetts for the same period (1880-89) 17,550 
deaths from diphtheria and croup among 475,000 children between the 
ages of to 15 years, a ratio of 3.7 deaths per thousand of the people 
annually of that period of life, which was greater than the mortality at 
the school. In connection with these cases, however, the following 
comment should be made : Between July 1, 1884, and October, 1890, out 
of 2,493 admissions to the hospital of the institution, from all causes, 
there were recorded 371 cases from the following causes combined, — 
diphtheria, tonsillitis and follicular tonsillitis, pharyngitis, laryngitis, 
sore throat and swollen tonsils, — or 14.9 per cent, of the whole number 
of admissions, of which 14 only, or but little more than half of one per 
cent , were determined to be diphtheria. In view of the extreme uncer- 
tainty which attends the diagnosis of mild cases of diphtheria, from the 
other diseases named in this list, it is quite possible that at least some 
of these may have been mild and unrecognized cases of" diphtheria. 

For the purpose, first, of preventing the introduction of diphtheria from 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 9 

without, and secondly, to prevent its spread if once introduced into the 
school, the Board would make the following' recommendations : — 

That measures of a quarantine character should be adopted with ref- 
erence to all children admitted to the school, especially those coming 
from districts in which one or more infectious diseases of dangerous 
character are known to be prevailing. Care should be taken to make 
inquiry as to the prevalence of such diseases during the previous month 
in the city or town, institution or family, from which the child is admitted. 
A medical examination, to include a special examination of the throat, 
should be required on the admission of each child ; and any suspicious 
case, or one found to be infected with any contagious disease, should be 
isolated. Such measures can now be carried out under the direction of 
the resident physician. The attention of the trustees is respectfully 
called, in this connection, to the following extract from the fourth report 
of the State Board of Health, Lunacy and Charity, 1882, page 135 : " All 
children, as they come into the institution, will be isolated for a while, 
till it is ascertained whether they are affected with any contagious dis- 
ease." For the further prevention of the introduction of infectious 
disease, the admission of visitors, especially the relatives and friends of 
children (coming, as they do, from a class unusually liable to the occur- 
rence of infectious diseases), should be allowed only under careful 
supervision. 

For the prevention of the spread of diphtheria or other infectious 
diseases, after they have once been introduced from without, the wards 
in the second and third stories of the east end of the building should 
receive a thorough cleansing and disinfection ; such measures cannot 
well be adopted during their occupancy, and could only be carried out 
with efficiency under improved methods of construction and arrangement. 

As additional precautions, it is recommended that the heads of all 
children coming from the hospital for infectious diseases should be 
closely cropped, and the hair destroyed by burning ; and the clothing 
used there during their illness should be scalded in a solution of 
bichloride of mercury, 1 to 1,000. The beds in the dormitories should 
each be marked with a permanent number, for the purpose of identifica- 
tion of each child. Finally, the small play-house at the east end of the 
yard should be destroyed, and a new one erected in a new location. 

By order of the Board, 

SAM'L W. ABBOTT, 

Secretary. 



10 PRIMARY AXD REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



LYMAX SCHOOL FOE BOYS. 
WESTBOROUGH. 



When five years ago the old Reform School at Westbor- 
ough, with its congregate plan and enclosed yard, was abol- 
ished, and, rebaptized the Lyman School, was reorganized in 
its present quarters upon the family system, the trustees felt 
that a long step in right methods of reforming youth had 
been taken. Year by year since then they have noted the 
good effects of this change, and have tried still further to 
improve their methods. 

Their chief efforts have been directed toward raising the 
standard of education. Here was much room for improve- 
ment, for our boys, recruited from the truant and the vagrant 
class, seemed almost hopeless in the presence of books. 
How such inert minds may be awakened is a problem upon 
which the present superintendent has for over two years 
labored intelligently and with striking success. The Sloyd 
system of wood working, taught in connection with drawing 
and clay modelling, has been introduced, and proves excel- 
lently adapted to develop the mind through the hand and 
eye ; and the specimens of the boys' work show on their part 
a high degree of patience and skill. Observation lessons 
in botany, and singing by note, have also proved interesting 
and helpful studies ; and as compared with former days the 
whole character of the school-room gives evidence of an 
awakened interest and intelligence. The cost of instruction 
in these new branches is paid for from the Lyman Fund. 
The school session is only in the afternoon, the morning 
hours being spent in work upon the farm, in housework, or 
in one or the other of the shops. Thirteen boys have been 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 11 

employed in the sewing room, where shirts and trousers are 
made as well as mended. In the shoe shop, in addition to 
the old work of cobbling, the mallets of 7 boys — 24 different 
ones during the year — are busy heel cutting, an industry 
demanding hard work and skill, and fitting the worker to 
earn good wages when he leaves the school. Six boys are 
at work every day in the printing press, 15 having been 
employed there during the year. The house and laundry 
work always occupies a large corps of workers, few, how- 
ever, being so employed for more than three months. The 
barn and various kinds of farm work are as far as possible 
performed by the boys, and each family has about an acre 
and a half of land under cultivation as a kitchen garden ; 
here in turn the majority of the boys learn something of the 
cultivation of the soil, the produce of their labor supplying 
them with a healthful variety of vegetables. Still other boys 
have been employed at such miscellaneous work as house 
painting, road making, breaking stone, etc. Chair seating 
is still resorted to in winter and in bad weather, but to a 
less degree than formerly, and the trustees hope still further 
to supplant it. 

The military drill, introduced eighteen months ago, does 
much to cure the boys of slovenly, slouching ways, and to 
teach habits of prompt obedience. The standard of cleanli- 
ness has also been materially raised, the weekly bath and 
weekly shirt, worn day and night, having given place to 
daily washings and a change of shirts for school. Only those 
experienced in the details of institution life will realize the 
difficulty of this innovation. 

Alt commitments to the Lyman School are for minority ; 
after a detention of about 17 months, the wards are released on 
probation, either to their parents or others, usually farmers, 
whose homes have been approved by the State. During this 
period of probation they are under the care of officers of the 
State Board of Lunacy and Charity. The supervision of 
these officers, formerly occupied likewise in visiting the 
Primary School wards and in attending the courts, the 
trustees long considered inadequate ; but a year or more ago 
the State Board added to their staff an officer whose sole 
duty it should be to supervise the 279 Lyman School boys 



12 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

who are out on probation. This increased supervision has 
resulted in an unusually large number doing well. The 
trustees have further believed that a longer detention in the 
school would produce better results ; but the crowded condi- 
tion of the houses, constantly forcing the inmates to be 
released to make room for new-comers, has only allowed 
the former time of 13 months to be increased to 16 or 17. 
The time will be further lengthened as accommodations 
allow. The average number in the school has been 186.46, 
against 168.23 the year previous; this increase, however, 
has been wholly due to the lengthened detention of the 
inmates, the number of new commitments having fallen from 
124 to 92. This sudden decrease, following as it does a 
steady increase for many years previous, is as unexplained as 
it was unexpected. It has been most opportune, as other- 
wise the numbers would have been hardly manageable. 
There were, — 

In the school Sept. 30, 1889, 184 

New commitments, ........ 92 

Returned, 19 

Total in the school during the year, .... 295 

The disposition of these boys was as follows : — 

Released on probation, 91 

Ran away, 6 

Transferred to Prison, 6 

Transferred to Workhouse, ...... 1 

Transferred to Primary School, 1 

Died, 1 

Discharged as unfit subjects, ...... 4 

Remaining in the school Sept. 30, 1890, . . . . 185 

Total, . . . . . ". 295 

Of the 94 boys released on probation, 46 went to their 
own homes and 48 to places ; of the latter, 2 were returned 
to the school, 9 ran away and 37 have done well, or at least 
kept their places. 

The whole number in the care of the school, i.e., including 
with the above mentioned all boys under twenty-one and still 
visited, is 463, — 184 being in the school, 169 in their homes, 
and 110 in place. This gives a total of 279 on probation, of 
whom 235 are reported as doing well, 22 badly and 22 not heard 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 13 

from within the year. A large discount, however, must be 
made from this excellent showing, for these figures take no 
account of the many who, while really still in our custody, 
have dropped out of the ranks of the visited, — runaways 
and vagrants who disappear, or who, for new offences, by 
transfer of the trustees or by sentence of the court, find their 
way to the workhouse or to prison. For instance, the names 
of no less than 74 Lyman School boys, still under twenty- 
one, and therefore really our wards, are found on the books 
of Concord Prison ; and, except of the 6 transferred there by 
the trustees within the year, no mention of these appears in 
our records. Evidently, therefore, our 235 doing well must 
be taken as a statement by itself, not as an indication of the 
per cent, of our successes, for which we have no adequate 
statistics. 

In May the Legislature voted a special appropriation of 
$16,000 for the erection of a seventh family house, — an addi- 
tion imperatively demanded by the crowded condition of the 
school. Plans were at once prepared by Stephen C. Earl of 
Worcester, and bids were called for ; but, owing partly perhaps 
to the carpenters' strike, the lowest bid exceeded the appro- 
priation by over $1,000. The trustees therefore decided to 
build under the direction of the superintendent, Mr. Clark, 
the engineer of the school and a competent builder, to over- 
see the work, and the architect to advise as called for. This 
throws an enormous burden upon the superintendent, but it 
seemed the only course open ; and it is hoped that the build- 
ing, for which the boys have done much work, digging the 
cellar, blasting and splitting stone, carting material and piling 
bricks, will prove less expensive than if built under contract. 

A further appropriation of $2,500 must be asked this year 
to furnish the house. Also a sum is needed to improve the 
water supply, the buildings being at present without any 
adequate protection in case of fire. 

The current appropriation was $42,375, and the per capita 
cost, making no allowance for cash returned to the treasury, 
was $4.24, just two cents less than the year before. As this 
takes no account of money spent from the Lyman Fund, the 
real amount spent on the school is even larger than appears. 
But the trustees are satisfied that the work, being well 
done, is not unduly expensive. 



14 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 

LANCASTER. 



This school has been carried on according to the principles 
and methods so thoroughly described in last year's report. 

The average number in the school has been 94. This 
increase is to be accounted for by the fact that there had 
been 73 commitments last year, 56 this year ; making 129 
within the two years ending Sept. 30, 1&90. During the 
two years ending Sept. 30, 1880, there had been but 65, 
about half as many. 

During the year there have been within the school for more or 

less time, . 171 

In the school Sept. 30, 1889, 87 

Returned to the school, having been placed out in 

former years, 28 

New commitments, . . 56 

Total in school, . . . . . . . . — 171 

The following disposition was made of these girls : — 

In the school Sept. 30, 1890, 
In places, . 
With friends, 
Married, . 
Almshouse, 
Other institutions, 
Reformatory prison, . 
Discharged, 
Died, .... 
Ran away from place, not recovered, 
Total 



There have been placed out during the year, 



97 
54 

8 

1 

2 

2 

1 

9 
1 

3 

— 171 



* Of the 86 placed out, there have been placed once, 

" " twice, . 

" " three times, 

Whole number of placings out, .... 



106 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



15 



lis" the 28 of former 



There have been returned (includ 
placing), .... 
For illness, 

change of place, . 
unsatisfactory conduct, 
theft, .... 
serious immorality, 
Returned from elopement, 
Transferred from prison, . 
Transferred from other institut: 
Total returned to the school, 



Total in custody Sept. 30, 1889, 

Committed this year, 

Total in custody during the year (including 
already accounted for), .... 



Of whom there have attained their majority, 

Discharged by vote of trustees, 

Died, 



the 171 



Total who have come of age, been discharged or died, 



At work in families, 

At work elsewhere, 

On probation with friends, 
Married in former years, not yet twenty-one, 
Married this year, not yet twenty-one, 
Total self-supporting, 



In school Sept. 30, 1890, 

In other institutions, ...... 

Transferred to Reformatory Prison in former years, 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison this year, 
Total still supported by the Stale, 

Ran away from place in former years, not recovered, 
Ran away from place this year, not recovered, 



6 

7 
10 

2 
9 

7 
1 
2 



261 

56 



— 317 

27 

13 

4 



89 
1 

29 
21 

13 



97 
5 
2 
1 



Total still in care of trustees, 



10 
273 



These girls have been gathered in while under seventeen 
years of age, from all parts of the State and for various 
misdemeanors. Thirty-one of them were sent upon com- 
plaint of parents who probably had no other motive than the 
welfare of their children, nearly all of them being over four- 



16 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

teen at time of commitment, and capable of assisting their par- 
ents by their work if they could have been managed at home. 

It is difficult for well-bred and law-abiding citizens to con- 
ceive of the utter disregard for the laws of health, decency or 
morality which distinguishes a certain class of young people 
who are growing up in the community. Whether or not 
the parents or the social conditions of the place are at fault 
in every case, it is certain that many girls who have been 
committed to the school at Lancaster there discover, for the 
first time in their lives, that it is possible to be at once good 
and happy. 

The report of the superintendent, which will be found on 
page 91, describes the peculiar difficulties to be overcome 
in order to fit such girls for a life of honest self-support. 
Each girl, during her stay in the school, has opportunity to 
acquire a practical knowledge of household arts and econo- 
mies. The various branches are taught by competent 
matrons, teachers and housekeepers, and are as carefully 
planned for one department as for another, the main stress 
being laid upon the industrial work, which is to be performed 
intelligently and in proper rotation. The superintendent, 
when asked how she managed to find and to keep so excellent 
a corps of officers, answered, "Because they do not know 
that there is a superintendent here;" or, in other words, 
because the officers of each household are made to feel the 
responsibility for the welfare of their family of twenty-five 
girls, and are encouraged to reach them by their personal 
influence. 

The girls are classified upon their arrival at the school, 
every facility having been afforded by the State Board's 
agents, who attend the trials of all juvenile offenders. The 
superintendent is thus enabled to assign each to the house 
where she will be least likely to learn evil of which she is 
innocent, or to injure those more innocent than herself. 
There is no system of promotion from one family to another, 
nor is a girl removed from the house where she was first 
placed except for very serious cause. There have been few 
instances of punishment more severe than deprivation of 
privileges, or seclusion in a girl's own sleeping-room. The 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 17 

aim of the officers has been to lead the girls to look forward, 
not backward. With this end in view, a competitive exhibi- 
tion of embroidery and hemstitching on linen was planned, the 
work to be done during recreation hours ; prizes were offered 
for those whose names appear on the roll of honor. Three- 
part songs and anthems with frequent change of key have 
been well rendered, often without accompaniment. When 
a requisition is sent to one of the houses for haymakers or 
workers on the farm or garden, nearly every hand is raised ; 
and all who have earned the privilege are allowed to take 
part in these health-giving occupations. 

The two thousand dollars appropriated for improvements 
on House No. 5 — i.e., the wooden cottage — will prove 
ample for that purpose. The changes there are well under 
way. Eight more girls can be cared for, additional sleeping- 
rooms for that number being now provided. By the removal 
of partitions and other changes this house will become the 
most convenient on the grounds for the necessary domestic 
labor of the family. Careful drainage has removed many 
of the defects of an unfavorable location. The improve- 
ments in the water supply, besides various repairs about the 
premises, have been completed. 

The trustees welcome the special provision now afforded 
by the Massachusetts School for the Feeble-minded for the 
reception into the custodial department of that institution 
of girls who are at once under the average of intelligence 
and with vicious tendencies. Such a combination renders a 
young woman unsafe when at large, and injurious to the com- 
munity, inasmuch as she is liable to bring into the world 
illegitimate children of equally low grade with herself. Her 
defective intellect serves as a plea — as a valid reason, in 
fact — for exempting her from the restraint or other penalty 
to which persons of ordinary intelligence are properly 
liable. 

In reviewing the list of girls placed out on probation, the 
trustees have to record a few instances of unusually bad 
conduct, while there have been many instances of exception- 
ally good conduct. Among the first mentioned are two cases 
of larceny from employers; one where money was taken, 



18 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

another of valuable clothing. In the one case the employer 
had been fully informed of the fact that the girl had been 
committed to the school for stealing. Her irreproachable 
conduct while in the school and on probation had disarmed 
suspicion, nor can any explanation of her act be obtained. 
The mother of this girl has promised to refund the employer 
in full. In the other instance, the girl, an orphan, after 
several years at Monson and in a private industrial school, 
had been returned to her relatives, who, in order to rescue 
her from a disreputable house, had caused her arrest, and 
commitment to the school at Lancaster. Her improvement 
in obedience and self-control during her second year had 
warranted the superintendent in giving her a trial outside 
the school, there being no reason to suspect her of dishonesty. 
Should such cases again occur, the trustees would invariably 
recommend to the employer to enter prosecution before the 
criminal courts. 

The steady demand for the services of the industrial school 
girls proves that such instances as the above are of rare 
occurrence, 

In justice to the work of the school, a few of the encour- 
aging cases deserve mention. Among these is one who 
before her commitment had nearly been ruined by neglect 
or worse on the part of her parents. During the five years 
of her probation she has kept the same place, and has proved 
so faithful and responsible as to be thoroughly valued by the 
family. Another who had made trouble when first placed 
out is now noted for her reliable character and for her neat- 
ness in every branch of work. A girl who had petitioned 
for discharge, which was granted in view of her good con- 
duct, comes now of her own accord to ask advice of the 
auxiliary visitor of the district, and has proved herself worthy 
of the confidence reposed in her. A colored girl who had 
been a source of much anxiety is now reported to be earning 
five dollars per week as cook in a hotel. 

Among those well married may be mentioned a girl who 
had formerly been committed on the technical complaint of 
"assault and battery." Gentle and obedient while in the 
school, she was placed out to assist in housework. She 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 19 

has since become a wife and mother, happy in the re- 
spect of her husband and neighbors. Yet another of these 
wards, who had been a source of great anxiety, has 
become a devoted wife and mother, with two promising 
children. One of the girls, who had been so indolent and 
unreliable as to lose place after place, was transferred by 
the State Board to the Lancaster school. Under date of 
July, 1890, this young woman writes: "As I am twenty- 
one years old, I wrote to Mrs. L. (her visitor), and 
she told me to write to you and you would give me my 
money. I am going to be married this month ; I am going 
to get a good home and husband, he is very steady and good. 
Let me thank you and all my friends for all the good you 
have done for me. Some of the pleasantest hours of my life 
have been spent in the school. I am thankful I went there 
when I did, for it might have been too late if I had not. 
Now, Mrs. Brackett, 1 guess you will be tired of reading 
this uninteresting letter, but glad to get rid of the care o! 
one of your girls." 

One who under shameful temptation became a mother 
without marriage, has humbly and faithfully supported her 
child, keeping it in its cradle in the kitchen where she 
worked, and retaining her excellent place after coming of 
age. 

The trustees present, this year, no petition for a special 
appropriation at the State Industrial School. They ask for 
a liberal appropriation for salaries and for current expenses, 
including in the latter a possible provision for the prepa- 
ration of some parts of the farm for raising cranberries and 
other small fruit, from which some profit might be obtained 
at a moderate cost and mainly by the labor of the girls. 
The increased value of the products of the farm is to a 
considerable extent due to the assistance rendered by the 
girls during the past two years, the net gain in produce on 
hand being $984.52, and in produce consumed, $1,(555.56; 
making a total increase of $2,640.08 in farm products, not 
including stock. The gross per capita cost per week has 
.been $4.08. 

More than $1,000 has been deposited with the treasurer, 



20 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

this amount representing the savings of those girls who 
have been placed out on probation, after having received 
such training as prepares a girl to become, not a mere 
household drudge, but an intelligent and interested helper. 

Respectfully submitted by the trustees, 

M. H. WALKER, Westborough, President. 
CHARLES L. GARDNER, Palmer, Treasurer. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS, Boston, Secretary. 
HENRY C. GREELEY, Clinton. 
M. J. SULLIVAN, Chicopee. 
MILO HILDRETH, Northborough. 
ELIZABETH C. PUTNAM, Boston. 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



21 



TRUST FUNDS OF LYMAN SCHOOL. 



TREASURER'S ACCOUNT. 



Charles L. Gardner, 



Oct. 


1. 


Nov. 


1. 


Dec. 


21. 



31. 



Lyman Fund. 

Treasurer, in account with Income of Lyman 
Fund. 



Dr. 

Balance former account, $3,918 22 

Interest note, town of Northborough, ... 30 00 
State tax from tax commissioner on account of 

bank stock, . . . . . . . 76 84 

Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., .... 22800 



1890. 


Feb. 


18. 




18. 


April 


1. 




1. 




1. 


May 


1. 




17. 


July 


1. 




1. 


Aug. 


1. 




1. 


Sept. 


30. 




30. 




30. 




30. 



1889. 

Oct. 21. 
21. 
21. 
21. 
21. 
9. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



9. 
14. 



Interest on Old Colony R.R. bond, 
Interest on Worcester Street Railway bond 
Interest note, town of Marlborough, 
Dividend Citizens' National Bank, 
Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., . 
Interest note, town of Northborough, . 
Proceeds note, town of Marlborough, . 
Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., . 
Dividend Fitchburg R.R., 
Interest on Old Colony R.R. bond, 
Interest on Worcester Street Railway bond 
Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., . 
Dividend Citizens' National Bank, 
Interest on deposits Palmer National Bank, 
Money advanced for heel-cutting department, 

Paid by Order of Trustees. 

Cr. 

Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

J. H. Brown, account Manual Training School, 
C. Whitney & Co., acc't Manual Training School 
Chandler & Barber, acc't Manual Training School 

Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

William R. Emerson, building plans, 
A. M. Howe, merchandise for heel shop> 



30 00 
100 00 
206 25 
100 00 
228 00 

30 00 

10,053 85 

228 00 

184 00 

30 00 
100 00 
228 00 
100 00 
180 17 

86 67 

$16,138 00 



$50 00 
41 Q6 
21 25 
33 29 
75 18 
50 00 
41 6Q 
75 00 
23 50 



22 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Dec. 


14. 




14. 




14. 




14. 




14. 


1 


14. 




14. 


1890. 


Jan. 


10. 




10. 


Feb. 


10. 




10, 




10. 




10. 




10. 




10. 




10. 




10. 




10. 




10. 




10. 




10. 




10. 




10. 


March 14. 




14 


April 


4. 




4. 




4. 


May 


14. 




24. 


June 


12. 




12. 




12. 




12. 




12. 




12. 




28. 




28. 


, 


28. 


July 


1. 




1. 




1. 




1. 




15. 




15. 




15. 




15. 



G. & F. W. Wood, merchandise for heel shop, 
H. H. Mawhinney, merchandise for heel shop, 
J. A. Frye, merchandise for heel shop, . 
Geo. B. Brigham& Sons, merchandise for heel shop, 
T. F. Chapin, superintendent, Christmas enter- 
tainment, 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, . . . 
Anna L. Wilcox, salary, .... 



Mary L. Pettit, salary, . . . 

Anna L. Wilcox, salary, .... 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, .... 

Anna F. Wilcox, salary, .... 

Braman, Dow & Co., fitting- sewing room, 

C. Whitney & Co., 

Geo. A. Barnard, " " " 

C. W. Megguier, " " " 

Geo. H. Woodman & Co., " " 

Eli Sawyer, 

J. H. Brown, " " " 

Geo. W. Knapp, " ". " 

Rice and Griffin Mfg. Co. , " 

C Whitney & Co., 

Geo. H. Woodman & Co., " " " 

C. B. Frost & Co., 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, .... 

Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 

G T. Fairweather, military instruction, 

Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, .... 

Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, .... 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, .... 

Anna L. Wilcox, salary, .... 

C. A. Harrington, mason work, 

Boston & Albany R.R. Co., freight, 

Augustus Thomas & Co., cadet guns, . 

T. F. Chapin, superintendent, Fourth of July c( 

bration, 

Deposit Monson Savings Bank, 

Deposit Ware Savings Bank, . 

Deposit Springfield Institution for Savings, 

Deposit Palmer Savings Bank, 

Anna L. Wilcox, salary, .... 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, .... 

Mrs. M. W. Perkins, matron, 

Deposit Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank 

Deposit Hampden Savings Bank, . 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, .... 

Anna L. Wilcox, salary, .... 



$1 85 

51 39 

7 52 

2 41 

50 00 
41 66 
50 00 



. *1 OD 

50 00 


50 00 


50 


00 


106 


60 


36 


33 


34 


27 


30 


00 


21 


07 


19 


00 


14 


50 


13 


40 


10 


85 


83 


92 


34 


75 


10 


73 


50 00 


50 00 


60 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 


00 


50 00 


22 97 


10 90 


572 


55 


25 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 


00 


1,000 00 


50 00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


50 00 


50 00 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



23 



Sept. 18. Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 
18. Mary L. Pettit, salary, 
Balance forward, . 



$50 00 
50 00 

7,497 23 



$16,138 00 



Sept. 30, 1890. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 



Mary Lamb Fund, Lyman School. 

Charles L. Gardner, Treasurer, in account with Income of Mary 

Lamb Fund. 

1889. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Balance of former account, . . . . . $111 93 

Dec. 31. Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., .. .. . . 10 00 

1890. 

April 1. 
July 1. 

Sept. 30. 



Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 
Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 
Dividend Boston & Albany R.R. , 



1890. Cr. 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, . 



10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

$151 93 
$151 93 



CHARLES L. GARDNER, 

Treasurer. 



Bept. 30, 1890. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 



Inventory of Lyman School Investments, Lyman 

Par value. 

114 shares Boston & Albany R.R. stock, . . $11,400 00 

92 shares Fitchburg R.R. stock, .... 9,200 00 

40 shares Citizens' National Bank stock, . . 4,000 00 

1 $1,000 Old Colony R.R. bond, .... 1,000 00 

4 Worcester Street Railway bonds, . . . 4,000 00 

Note town of Northborough, .... 1,50000 

Deposit Monson Savings Bank, .... 1,000 00 

Deposit Ware Savings Bank, .... 1,000 00 

Deposit Palmer Savings Bank, . 1,000 00 

Deposit Hampden Savings Bank, . . . 1,000 00 

Deposit Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, . 1,000 00 

Deposit Springfield Institution for Savings, . 1,000 00 

Deposit Palmer National Bank, ... . . 7,497 23 

Mary Lamb Fund. 

Par value . 

Five shares Boston & Albany R.R. stock, . $500 00 

Deposit in People's Savings Bank, . . . 473 55 

Deposit in Palmer National Bank, ... 151 93 



Fund. 

Market value. 

$22,572 00 
7,912 00 
4,800 00 
1,160 00 
4,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 
7,497 23 

Market value 

$990 00 

473 55 

151 93 



CHARLES L. 



Sept. 30, 1890. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 



GARDNER, 

Treasurer 



24 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



TKUST FUNDS STATE 'INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL. 



Charles L. Gardner, Treasurer, in account with Mary Lamb Fund 

1889. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Balance of former account, 

4. Dividend Boston National Bank, .... 

Dec. 29. State tax refunded on bank stock, 

1890. 

April 1. Dividend Boston National Bank, .... 

Sept. 30. Dividend Boston National Bank, .... 



1889. CR. 

Dec. 14. Mrs. L. L. Brackett, superintendent, Christmas 
entertainment, . . . . 

1890. 

April 5. W. B. Clark & Co., books. 

June 12. T. F. Chapin, superintendent, expenses to Balti- 
more, 

12. L. L. Brackett, superintendent, expenses to Balti- 
more, 

28. L. L. Brackett, superintendent, Fourth of July 

celebration, 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, 



Sept. 30, 1890. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH 



#102 


92 


32 


50 


20 


37 


32 50 


32 


50 



$220 79 



$30 00 


22 


90 


34 


19 


38 


35 


20 


00 


75 


35 



$220 79 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 25 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL TKUST FUND. 



Charles L. Gardner, Treasurer, in Account with Industrial School 

Trust Fund. 

.1890. Dr. 

Sept. 30. Interest from Chelsea Savings Bank, ... $41 22 



Paid by Order of Trustees. 

1890. CR. 

Sept. 30. For highest grade deportment, to eight girls, . $41 22 

CHAELES L. GARDNER, 

Treasurer. 
Sept. 3, 1890. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 



Inventory of Industrial School Investments, Mary Lamb Fund. 

1890. Par value. Market value. 

Sept. 30. 13 shares Boston National Bank, . . $1,300 00 $1,560 00 
Deposit in Palmer National Bank, . 75 35 75 35 



Fay Fund. 

1890. 

Sept. 30. Deposit in Chelsea Savings Bank, . . . $1,000 00 



Rogers Fund. 

1890. 

Sept. 30. One State of Maine 6 per cent, bond, in custody 

of State Treasurer, $1,000 00 

. CHARLES L. GARDNER, 

Treasurer. 
Sept. 3, 1890. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 

MlLO HlLDRETH. 



26 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct.'90. 



1890. 

Sept. 30. Cash received from superintendent for deposit to 
credit of sundry girls, from Sept. 30, 1889, to 
Sept. 30, 1890, 

By deposits in savings banks on account of sundry 
girls, 

Cash drawn from savings banks on account of 
sundry girls, from Sept. 30, 1889, to Sept. 30, 
1890, 

By paid amounts drawn from savings banks, 



1,060 


15 


1,060 


15 


580 


03 


586 03 



1800. 

Sept. 30. 



Memorandum of Savings Deposits for Girls. 

1 depositor in People's Savings Bank. 

1 depositor in Mercantile Savings Institution. 

3 depositors in Clinton Savings Bank. 
27 depositors in Boston Five Cents Savings Bank. 
63 depositors in Westborough Savings Bank. 
96 depositors in Palmer Savings Bank. 



CHARLES L. 



GARDNER, 

Treasurer. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL 



MONSON. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



lo the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools 

The annual report of the superintendent concerning the 
State Primary School for the year ending Sept. 30, 1890, 
including tables of statistics for the year, is now presented. 
A year ago the number of persons as pupils or inmates in 
the school was 343. . The year closes with 355. The least 
number during the year was 339 — Nov. 23. The greatest 
number was 385 — April 5. Average number, 359. The 
total number who have received the care of the school during 
the year has been 601. At the present time there are 254 
boys, 82 girls and 19 women. During the year 222 have 
been placed out on trial or on board, 25 have been discharged, 
20 have been removed to other institutions, and 8 have died. 
These have been maintained at a cost of $52,685.61, or a 
weekly per capita cost of $2.82. This total cost is about 
$1,500 more than that of a year ago, while the weekly per 
capita cost is 31 cents less, and the average number of 
inmates 45 more. The number of children now at board in 
families is 55. The total amount expended for boarded-out 
children, during the year, is $5,089 63, or a weekly per 
capita cost of $2.02. 

The work in the medical department has been somewhat 
greater and more varied than for several years past. In 
common with other communities, this community suffered 
from "La Grippe" during the last part of December and the 
first part of January. A large number of the inmates were 
sick more or less, and much unusual work was required. 
There were no deaths directly from this cause, but more 
sickness has prevailed during the months since, which may 
be attributed to "La Grippe," either directly or indirectly. 
As will be seen by the physician's report, there have been 
seven cases of diphtheria during the year. None of these 
proved fatal and all recovered rapidly. The work done b}' 
Dr. Haynes until her resignation, May 1, and that done by 



30 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

her successor, Dr. Laura A. Calver, is certainly deserving 
of commendation. For a more detailed statement, your 
attention is respectfully called to the physician's report on 
page 49. 

It is possible that the old buildings in which the children 
live, and in which they play, are becoming unhealthy ones. 
If anything can be done in the way of changes and repairs to 
render the possibly unhealthy portions more healthy, the 
cause of humanity demands that it should be done, even if 
the expense be considerable. 

The report of the principal of the schools is also offered 
with this report, and to it I wish to call your attention. 
The earnestness with which the teachers have done their 
work is deserving of much praise. The children for the 
most part have been attentive and have made good progress. 
The work in manual training has been continued with good 
results. About sixty boys have had instruction in military 
tactics, and have succeeded admirably in mastering the 
manoeuvres and in executing the commands as directed. 
The children have found employment in the ways indicated 
in Statement " K." Statements " H " and "I" convey some 
idea of the work done in the sewing rooms. Just how much 
has been done by the children in the building, about the 
grounds and on the farm, cannot be expressed by any tables 
that can be presented. Sufficient to say that a large amount 
of work has been done, and most of it cheerfully done, with- 
out interfering with the regular work in the school-room. 

The setting of the boilers which was in process a year ago 
was successfully completed in due time, and the boilers put 
in operation at once. After a year's experience with them 
it can truly be said, as it was said a year ago, that the terms 
of the contract seem to have been honorably met. The 
total cost to the school for the three boilers was $3,288.54. 

The hospital and carpenter's shop have each received a 
coat of paint during the summer. Such repairs as have 
seemed necessary to keep the buildings in favorable condi- 
tion have been made from time to time, old drains have 
been relaid, and improvements on the farm have not been 
forgotten. 

A year ago your attention was called to the condition of 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT - No. 18. 31 

the water supply for the school. There has been no time 
during the year when the supply seemed about to fail, }^et, 
on account of the dry weather in July, the water in the west 
reservoir was very low. At this time its use was very dis- 
agreeable, so that we were temporarily obliged to get the 
supply for drinking purposes from a spring at the rear of 
the barn, and some distance from it. The west reservoir 
cannot be drained except at much inconvenience and no 
little expense. On that account no attempt has been made 
to drain it thoroughly and clean it since the summer of 1885, 
when the water was much lower than at any time since. 
When the reservoir is full and water runs to waste, its use 
is not so objectionable. The suggestion was made a year 
ago that the west bank of the south reservoir be repaired 
and changed so as to prevent the wasting of so much water, 
that we might draw most of our daily supply from this 
point. This suggestion is now renewed . If carried out, a 
few hundred dollars will be needed and ought to be drawn 
from an extra appropriation. The convenience and comfort 
of the entire population here would seem to justify us in 
asking for this. 

Under a resolve passed by the last Legislature and approved 
.June 3, a sum not exceeding $600 was appropriated to be 
expended in the purchase of land and the erection of a coal 
shed. The land has been purchased and a beginning has' 
been made for a coal shed. The appropriation will be 
insufficient to complete the work. As the fence adjoining 
the highway is almost worthless, a sum about equal to that 
already appropriated will be needed to complete the shed 
and build a fence so as to properly protect the crops which 
may be grown upon 'the land. 

Looking forward, there are seen great possibilities for these 
children, and great work for those who have them in charge. 
Looking backward over the past year, the "might-have- 
beens" are constantly coming to mind. With gratitude for 
your assistance and for kindnesses shown to me and mine, 
this report is respectfully submitted. 



Oct. 1, 1890. 



AMOS ANDREWS, 

Superintendent. 



32 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Statement A. — Summary of Admissions and Discharges. 





Boys. 


Girls. 


Women. 


Totals. 


Present Sept. 30, 1889 


234 


94 


15 


343 


Received from State Almshouse at Tewks- 
bury, . . . 


32 


14 


9 


55 


Received from Superintendent Indoor Poor, 
as juvenile offenders, .... 


47 


8 


_ 


55 


Received from Superintendent Indoor Poor, 
as neglected children, .... 


56 


44 




100 


Received from Superintendent Indoor Poor, 
as dependent children, .... 


6 


2 


_ 


8 


Received from Children's Hospital, 


1 


1 


- 


2 


Received from State Farm at Bridgewater, 


1 


1 


- 


2 


Received from Lyman School for Boys, 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Received from Deaf and Dumb Asylum at 
Hartford, 


1 


1 


_ 


2 


Returned, placed in previous years, . 


25 


8 


- 


.33 


Returned, having been placed out since 
Sept. 30, 1889, 


25 


8 




33 


Totals, 


429 


181 


24 


634 


Discharged by Board of Lunacy and 
Charity, 


12 


12 


1 


25 


Placed out on trial, ..... 


122 


57 


- 


179 


Boarded out in families, .... 


22 


21 


- 


43 


Removed to State Almshouse at Tewks- 
bury, . 


3 


3 


1 


7 


Removed to State Farm at Bridgewater, 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Removed to School for Feeble-minded at 
Waltham, 


. 4 


1 


_ 


5 


Removed to Children's Hospital for treat- 
ment, ....... 


2 


2 


^. 


4 


Removed to Deaf and Dumb Asylum at 
Hartford, 


1 


1 


_ 


2 


Removed to Perkins Institute for the Blind, 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Died, 


6 


2 


- 


8 


Eloped, and not returned, .... 


1 


- 


3 


4 


Totals, 


175 


99 


5 


279 


Remaining Sept. 30, 1890, .... 


254 


82 


19 


355 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



33 



Statement B. 

Number of Children received from, Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 
Juvenile Offenders . 

During year ending Sept. 30, 1886, . . . . . .40 

" " " 30, 1887, .' 34 

" 30, 1888, 48 

" 30, 1889, . . . . . .36 

" *30, 1890, 55 

Average for 5 years, 42+ 



Number of Children received from Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 
Neglected Children. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1886, 32 



30, 1887, 
30, 1888, 
30, 1889, 
30, 1890, 



Average for 5 years, 



23 
21 
75 
100 
50+ 



Number of Children received from Superintendent of Indoor Poor, as 
Dependent Children. 



Year ending 


Sept. 


30, 1886, 


. . .11 




" 


30, 1887, 


9 


" 


" 


30, 1888, 


. 10 


" 


" 


30, 1889, 


6 


u u 


u 


30, 1890, 


8 


Average for 5 yea 


PS, . . , 


. . . 8+ 



Number Received from State Almshouse. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1886, . 

" 30, 1887, . 

" 30,1888, . 

" 30, 1889, . 

" 30, 1890, . 
Average for 5 years, 



27 

76 
48 
59 
55 
53 



Number of Children returned from Place, having been placed out in 

Previous Years. 



Year ending Sept. 30, 1886, 


47 


" 30, 1887, . . 


* . . .46 


" 30, 1888, 


. 45 


" « 30, 1889, 


. 51 


30, 1890, ..... 


oo 


Average^_forj5 years, 


. 44+ 



34 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 



Number of Children returned from Place, having been placed out in 

Current Years. 

Year ending- Sept 30, 1886, 34 

" 30, 1887, 46 

" 30, 1888, 43 

" 30, 1889, 31 

30, 1890, 33 

Average for 5 years, 37 

Statement C. — Nativity of Inmates. 

The nativity of the 222 persons received during the year (not includ- 
ing those returned from places) is as follows : — 

Native born, 173 

Foreign born, ........... 41 

Unknown, . . . . . . 8 

Of the foreign born, there were born in — 



Austria, .... 


1 


New Brunswick, 






1 


Canada, .... 


6 


Nova Scotia, .... 4 


England, 


11 


Scotland 3 


Ireland, .... 


14 


Sweden, 1 


Of those born in the United States 


, there were born in — 


California, 


1 


New York, . . 5 


Connecticut, . 


4 


Ohio, 


1 


Maine, .... 


2 


Rhode Island, 


... 4 


Massachusetts, 


151 


Vermont, 


. . . 1 


New Hampshire, . 


4 






Of those born in Massachu 


setts, tl 


lere were born in — 


Berkley, .... 


1 


Gloucester, .... 3 


Beverly, .... 


1 


Great Barrington, 






3 


Boston, .... 


14 


Hampden, 






4 


Cambridge, . 


1 


Hanover, 






1 


Charlestown, . 


1 


Haverhill, 






2 


Cherry Valley, 


1 


Holyoke, 






. 13 


Clinton, .... 


2 


Indian Orchard, 






1 


Cochituate, 


1 


Ipswich, . 






1 


Dalton, .... 


1 


Lawrence. 






o 


Danvers, 


1 


Lee, 






1 


Dennis, . . .* . 


1 


Longmeadow, 






1 


Easthampton, 


1 


Lowell, . 






6 


Everett, .... 


3 


Lynn, . 






2 


Fall River, 


3 


Maiden, . 






1 


Fitch burg, 


5 


Marlborough., 






1 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 


35 


Med way, .... 1 


Spencer, . 


l 


Melrose, . 






1 


Springfield, . 


9 


Monson, . 






5 


Stoneham, 


2 


Newburyport, 






1 


Tewksbury, . 


6 


Palmer, . 






5 


Wareham, 


1 


Pittsfield, 






4 


Watertown, . 


4 


Quincy, . 






1 


Wellesley, . 


1 


Rutland,. 






1 


Webster, 


1 


Salem, . 






1 


Westborough, 


1 


Sheffield, 






2 


Weymouth, . 


2 


Shelburne Falls, 






1 


Woburn, 


1 


South Boston, 






2 


Worcester, . - . 


3 


South Hadley, 






2 


Town unknown, 


. 11 


Somerville, . 






1 







36 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 





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40 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



5 ? 

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Supervisor, 

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Matron, 

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Principal and teacher of first class, 
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Amos Andrews, . 
Joseph H. Kenerson, 
0. L. Haynes, M D., . 
L. A. Calver, M. 1)., . 
James J. Prentiss, . 
Frank Duffy, . 
Elon G. Buss, . 
Erwin G. Ward, 
John E. Taylor, . 


Wm. M. Watson, 

Edward E. Walker, 

J. M. Sisk, . 

Mrs. M. A. Andrews, 

Miss Etta J. Lent, 

Miss A. Swinerton, . 

Mrs. C. A. Watson, . 

Miss N. J Rice, 

Miss Emma A. Moore, 

Miss EM. Fullington, 

Miss H L Lacey, 

Miss Carrie E Lacey, 

Miss G A. Cheney, . 

Miss E. E. Ltenerson, . 

Miss E. S. Foster, 

Miss Florence G. Bisseti 

Mrs. S. E. Prentiss, . 


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1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 41 



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42 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



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Night fireman, . 

Laborer, 

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Hostler, 


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John E. Taylor, 
William A. Warren, 
J. C. Rand, . 

A. W. Barlow, 
S S. Nichols, 

B. B. Barratt, 
E. W. TJpham, 

A. W. Barlow, . 
Willard A. Warren, 
George H. Miller, 
Frank L. Kingsley, 
James Skevington, 
J C. Rand, . 
Thomas J Flynn, 
Wm. P. Franklin, 
N. A. D. Wheeler, 
William Kelley, 




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1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



43 



Statement G-. — Products of the Farm. 



18!J0. Quantity. 


Value. 


Apples, early, ... 26 bushels, . 


f 19 50 


Apples, eider, . 








160 


32 00 


Apples, winter, 








42 barrels, . 


L68 00 


Asparagus, 








18 bushels, . 


36 00 


Beans, 
Beef, 








10 
15,406 pounds, , 


21 50 

806 98 


Beets, 








L 13 bushels, . 


86 75 


Cabbage, . 
Carrots, . 








2,573 heads. 
500 bushels, . 


155 84 
225 00 


Celery, 








700 bunches, . 


35 00 


Corn fodder, . 








9 tons, 


63 00 


Cucumbers, 








13 a bushels, . 


13 75 


Eggs, 








46 2 | dozen, 


95 94 


Ensilage, . 








115 tons. 


575 00 


Grapes, . 








12 bushels, . 


24 00 


Hay, . . 

Indian corn, 








160 tons, 


2,560 00 








250 bushels, . 


100 00 


Lettuce, . 








531 


24 00 


Mangolds, 








900 


270 00 


Manure, . 








500 cords, 


500 00 


Milk, 








144,763 quarts, 


5,790 52 


Oats, 








80 bushels, . 


44 00 


Oat straw, 








2 tons, 


24 00 


Onions, 








891 bushels, . 


84 63 


Pears, 








1 bushel, 


1 00 


Pease, 








371 bushels, . 


75 00 


Plums, 








H 


3 00 


Peppers, . 








\ bushel, 


50 


Pop-corn, . 








15 bushels, . 


22 50 


Potatoes, . 








736 


478 40 


Parsnips, . 








140 


105 00 


Poultry, . 








454| pounds, . 


90 90 


Pork, 








7,175" 


422 48 


Pumpkins, 








1,000 


20 00 


Quinces, . 








4 bushels, . 


12 00 


Radishes, . 








5i « 


8 25 


Ruta-bagas, 








175" 


43 75 


Rhubarb, . 








481 


29 10 


Rowen, . 








25 tons, 


300 00 


Rye, . 








108 bushels, . 


81 00 


Rye straw, 








101 tons, 


157 50 


Raspberries, 








9 quarts, 


1 08 


Strawberries, . 








648 


77 76 


Spinach, . 








9| bushels, . 


3 90 


Squash, summer, 








74 


45 25 


Squash, winter, 








5,208 pounds, . 


208 32 


Sweet corn, 








125 bushels, . 


50 35 


Tomatoes, 








41 " 
2 


3 60 


Turnips, . 








450f 


67 87 


Veal, 








822 pounds, . 


72 29 


Wood, . 








25 cords, 


112 50 










$14,248 71 



44 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 



Statement H. — Work done in Sewing-room No. 1. 



ARTICLES. 


Made. 


Repaired. 


Total. 


Aprons, ... 


331 


163 


494 


Bed spreads, 










13 


4 


17 


Bed ticks, . 










13 


312 


325 


Bibs, . 










6 


- 


6 


Belts, . 










12 


- 


12 


Bands, 










11 


- 


11 


Braces, 










2 


- 


2 


Blankets, . 










- 


9 


9 


Curtains, 










56 


- 


56 


Chemises, . 










51 


- 


51 


Clothes bags, 










3 


- 


3 


Coats, . 










- 


134 


134 


Dresses, 










299 


45 


344 


Drawers, 










431 


29 


460 


Eye shades, 










4 


' 


4 


Flags, . 










- 


1 


1 


Holders, 










40 


- 


40 


Hose, . 










- 


4,809 


4,809 


Night shirts, 










48 


- 


48 


Night dresses, 










281 


- 


281 


Names sewed on 










48 


- 


48 


Pillow cases, 










614 


90 


704 


Pillow ticks, 










40 


- 


40 


Penwipers, . 










90 


- 


90 


Rugs, . 










- 


13 


13 


Sacks, . 










56 


48 


104 


Shirts, 










- 


2,103 


2,103 


Shirt waists, 










3 


6 


9 


Sheets, 










675 


454 


1,129 


Skirts, 










393 


- 


393 


Shoulder blankel 


,s, 








24 


- 


24 


Towels, 










822 


332 


1.154 


Table cloths, 










16 


21 


37 


Table napkins, 










156 


10 


166 


Waists, 










183 


- 


183 


Wash cloths, 










396 


- 


396 












5,117 


8,583 


13,700 



1890] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 45 

Statement I. — Work done in Sewing-room No. 2. 



ARTICLES. 



Made. 



Repaired. 



Blouses, ...... 




130 


130 


Caps, . 










480 


95 


575 


Jackets, 










184 


1,994 


2,178 


Kitchen aprons, 










12 


- 


12 


Mats, . 










6 


_ 


6 


Mittens, 










4 


- 


4 


Pants, . 










733 


3,084 


3,817 


Shirts,. 










861 


- 


861 


Suspenders, 










164 


- 


164 




2,444 


5,303 


7,747 



Total number of articles made, 
Total number of articles repaired, 



7,561 
13,886 

21,447 



Statement J. 

Amos Andrews, Superintendent and Disbursing Officer of the State 

Primary School, in account with the State Treasurer. 

Dr. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1889, • . 

received from appropriation for current expenses for 

1889, 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1889, 

received from appropriation for current expenses for 



$100 00 

10,477 43 

1,409 63 

42,208 18 



1890,' ". . 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1890, 3,680 00 

received from appropriation for new boilers, . . 3,279 32 
received from appropriation for purchase of land and 

building new coal shed, 350 00 

received from sales, 216 00 



Cr. 
Disbursements for three months, ending Dec. 31, 1889, 
Disbursements for nine months, ending Sept. 30, 1890, 

Payments to State Treasurer, 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1890, 



$61,720 56 

Note. — This institution has no " fund" from which to draw for any 
expenditure whatever. It derives its support wholly from the State 
treasury by annual legislative appropriations. 



$61,720 56 

$15,266 38 

46,138 18 

216 Ot 

100 00 



46 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

The per capita cost for the year is $2 82. This sum shows the cost of 
clothing*, food and lodging, medical attendance, teaching and supervi- 
sion, — in brief, the entire expense of maintaining all the inmates of the 
institution, — together with all ordinary repairs, such as must constantly 
be made to keep the buildings and appliances in good condition ; in- 
cluding also the cost of heating and lighting the buildings, and of fur- 
nishing an outfit for all pupils going away from the school, and their 
travelling expenses. 

Children placed out on trial are provided with two complete suits of 
clothing, Avith an overcoat extra in cold weather, the whole outfit costing 
on an average $ 16.00. 

The State appropriations are made for calendar years, while the 
reports of institutions are made for years ending Sept 30. 

It will therefore readily be seen, that, while the expenditures are 
kept within the yearly appropriations, the expense for the institution 
year ma} T be larger or smaller than the appropriation, including, as it 
does, parts of two calender years. 

Statement K. — Employment of Children. 
There are employed in the — 



Dormitories and other parts of the house, 

Sewing-room No 1, 

Sewing-room No 2, . 

Dining-hall, ......... 

Kitchen, . . . . 

Shoe shop, .......... 

Bakery, 

Laundry, '-■■'. 

Hospital, . . . . 
On the farm and at the barns, . . . . 
Dormitories and miscellaneous work about the house 
and grounds, 



Boj's. 



41 



Girls. 



- 


6 


2 


40 


15 

00 


- 


5 


_ 


1 


- 


5 


- 


9 


_ 


2 


5 


26 


- 



Girls, 51 ; boys, 128 ; total, 179. 



Statement L. — Children boarded in Families. 

Children boarding in families Sept. 30, 1890, paid for from 

appropriations of State Primary School, .... 55 

Number of days 1 board paid for, . . . . . . 17,578 

Amount paid during the year, ...... $ 5,089 63 

Weekly per capita cost, 2 02 

Note. — This sum does not include expense of investigation of places, 
nor of visiting the children after being located, which is paid by the 
Department of Indoor Poor, and increases the cost to the State. 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



47 



Statement M. — Recapitulation of Inventory. 



Taken by J. B. Shaw and G. H. Fisher dick 

Sept. 30, 1890. 

Land, 

Buildings, 

Live stock, ...... 

Products of farm, 

Carriages and agricultural implements, 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 

Beds and bedding (inmates'), 

Other furniture (inmates 1 ), . 

Clothing, .... 

Superintendent's department, 

Dry goods, 

Groceries and provisions, 

Drugs and medicines, . 

Fuel, 

Library and school supplies, 

Heating, water and gas (with fixtures), 

Miscellaneous, 



of Palmer, Mass., as of 



$23,014 81 

99,630 00 

7,404 60 

6,838 40 

3,937 QQ 

10,900 70 

5,064 03 

5,942 70 

5,416 38 

6,632 98 

2,096 11 

2,673 65 

312 69 

2,491 00 

1,644 26 

22,300 00 

1,718 02 



|208,017 99 



Statement N. — Resources and Liabilities. 
Resources. 



Cash on hand, 
Unexpended appropriations, 



Miscellaneous bills, 



Liabilities. 



$100 00 
9,361 82 

$9,461 82 



176 05 



$9,285 77 



Statement O. — Summary of Farm Account. 

Dr. 

To live stock, as per inventory, . . . . . . $7,706 80 

wagons and agricultural implements, as per inventory, 2,167 28 

paid carpenter, painter, etc., for repairs, . . . 501 37 

wages of farm help, 2,098 01 

board of farm help, 1,061 40 

labor of children, 420 00 

live stock, 558 75 

grain, feed, etc., 1,776 52 

hardware, farm tools, etc., 221 33 



48 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



To blacksmith ing and repairs, 
lumber, 

harness and repairs, 
seeds, fertilizers, etc., 
rent of pasture, 
sundries, . 



By farm product of 1889, a 
labor for the school, . 
cost of keeping horses used foi 
sale of live stock, 
beef, . 
veal, . 
pork, . 

eggs and poultr 
milk, . 
wood, 

hay, straw, ensilage, etc 
fruit and vegetables, 



Cr. 

per inventory, . 

the school. 



$209 68 
202 70 

11 75 
230 61 
165 00 

30 89 



$17,362 


09 


$4,980 50 


607 


05 


312 


So 


216 


00 


806 


98 


72 


29 


422 


48 


186 


■si 


5,790 52 


112 50 


2,870 80 


3,765 


20 



$20,143 99 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



49 



PHYSICIAN'S KEPOKT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Beform Schools. 

The hospital report of the State Primary School for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1890, is as follows : — 



Number in hospital Sept. 30, 1889, 

admitted during the year, . 

discharged; 

of deaths, 

remaining in the hospital Sept. 30, 1890, 



28 

970 

958 

8 

32 



The following is a list of the cases admitted during the 
year, and also of some not admitted, but treated at daily 
clinic : — 



Asthma, 






1 


Erysipelas, 


. 


1 


Abscess in mouth, 






2 


Exhaustion from jumping 




Abscess on foot, 






2 


rope, .... 


3 


Bronchitis, 






85 


Enlarged inguinal glands, 


3 


Biliary colic, . 






1 


Enlarged cervical glands, 


3 


Burns, . 






1 


Furuncle, 


3 


Blind, . 






1 


Fingers badly cut, 


2 


Croup, . 






3 


Fracture of forearm, 


2 


Chicken-pox, . 






14 


Fainted, .... 


2 


Contusion of leg, 






2 


Follicular tonsillitis, ' . 


29 


Contusion of side, 






1 


General debility, . 


4 


Contusion of knee, 






4 


Gastritis, . . . 


2 


Crushed toes, . 






2 


Hasmatemesis, 


1 


Chills,' . 






1 


Incontinence of urine, . 


30 


Cholera morbus, 






1 


Indigestion, . 


167 


Caxalgia, 






4 


" La Grippe," 




185 


Diphtheria, 






7 


Laryngitis, 


. 


1 


Diarrhoea, 






23 


Malaria, . 


, 


3 


Dysmenorrhoea, 
Eczema, . 






1 
3 


Myalgia, 
Mumps, . 




2 
19 


Erythema, 






1 


Meningitis, 


. 


1 


Epilepsy, 






3 


Neuralgia, 


. 


3 



50 



PEIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 



Otalgia, .... 


9 


Scrofulosis, . 


. 




3 


Oxyurius vernucularis, . 


4 


Stomatitis, 




3 


Phthisis, .... 


.' 1 


Stomatitis, ulcerati 


ve, 




5 


Pertussis, 


. 34 


Scabies, . 






6 


Pharyngitis, . 


. 76 


Sprained ankle, 






2 


Pneumonia, . 


6 


Sprained fingers, 






25 


Pleurisy, 


2 


Tonsillitis, 






66 


Pleurodynia, . 


4 


Typhoid fever, 






1 


Palpitation of heart, 


3 


Talepes varus, 






2 


Pemphigus, . 


1 


Thrush, . 






1 


Paraplegia with scrotal h 


er- 


Ulcerated throat, 






8 


nia, .... 


1 


Urticaria, 






2 


Rickets, .... 


2 


Unclassified, . 






51 


Rheumatism, . 


9 


Wounds, 






9 



Diseases of the Ear. 

Otitis media puralenta acuta, 11 

Otitis media purulenta chronica, 1 



Diseases and Injuries of the Eye. 



Contusion of eyelids, 


5 


Purulent opthalmia, 


1 


Conjunctivitis, 


4 


Trachoma, 


1 


Opthalmia, 


1 


Mucocele, 


1 



Removal of wen, . 
Operation for strabismus, 



Operations. 



Operation for advancement. 
Mules operation on eye, 



There have been more cases recorded this year than usual. 
This is partly due to the prevalence of "La Grippe" during 
the winter, and partly to the fact that a large number of 
children have been admitted more than once, while others, of 
a weak constitution, have been recorded as many as eight or 
nine times. 

There have been eight deaths during the year. One, a boy 
of nineteen years, died of meningitis. Two of bronchitis : 
one, a baby, about six months old ; the other, a child of three 
years, who was blind, could not walk or talk, and had never 
taken any solid food. One of pneumonia, — a baby of six 
months. A boy of fifteen years died of phthisis. Another 
boy of ten years died of a malignant tumor. A little boy 
with hip disease, who was unable to walk for several months 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 51 

before his death, died of tuberculosis. A girl of eleven 
years, who also had hip disease, died of Bright's disease. 

Mules operation, given in the list of operations, was per- 
formed by Dr. Morgan of Springfield. It was very success- 
ful, and was, I understand, the fifth operation of that kind 
performed in this country. 

Every precaution is taken to prevent the spread of a 
contagious disease, all such cases being sent to the isolation 
hospital. All doubtful cases are also isolated. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

LAURA A. CALVER, 

Resident Physician. 



52 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



PRINCIPAL'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the State Primary School. 

I respectfully present you the following report, for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1890. It embraces general statistics, 
and other information concerning the school. 



Enrolment of Attendance. 

Number of pupils enrolled Oct. 1, 1889 : Boys, 223 ; girls, 86 ; total, 309 

Number of pupils enrolled, 1889-90 : Boys, 410 ; girls, 168 ; total, 578 

Largest number in attendance (April, 1890), . . . ' . 329 

Smallest number in attendance (January, 1890), .... 297 

Average daily attendance, 1889-90, 299 

Admitted, 1889-90, 202 

Readmitted, 1889-90, . .67 

Discharged, 1889-90, 248 

Died, 5 

Average age of pupils, 10.33 years. 

Number of pupils enrolled Sept. 30, 1890 : Boys, 249 ; girls, 76 ; 

total, 325 



Illiteracy at Entering. 



Could neither read nor write, .... 


. 71 


Could read and not write, 


. 11 


Could both read and write, .... 


. 120 


Never studied arithmetic, 


. 84 


Never studied geography, 


. 151 



Of those admitted, 49 had received instruction in some 
of the other branches commonly taught in the public school. 
There are now more pupils in all the classes than there have 
been for several years. This increase in numbers is par- 
ticularly noticeable in the classes where there are girls. 
The character of those admitted is about the same as it has 
been in the past. 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 53 

The main facts concerning the school have been given to 
you in previous reports. There is little new to be said. 

The teachers continue enthusiastic and faithful. Although 
they encounter, in their work, hinderances unknown to 
teachers in the public schools, their classes on the whole 
compare favorably with those in schools outside. 

The manual training, introduced last year, is now one of 
the regular features of the school work. It is not only help- 
ful as a moral agent, but it also gives the variety so essential 
in securing good results, and tends to make the lives of the 
children more interesting. This is the aim of every true 
teacher, and should be particularly held in mind by those 
whose pupils before entering school have known such scanty 
enjoyments as many of our boys and girls. Some of the 
children show a degree of skill in this department that is 
very gratifying to their teachers. Mechanical drawing is 
now taught in connection with the work in wood. 

The teachers appreciate highly the kindly forbearance, 
sympathy and support which they have never failed to 
receive from you. It is their wish, as time goes on, to make 
their work more and more worthy of your approval. 

Eespectfully submitted, 

EUGENIA M. FULLINGTON, 

Principal. 
Monson, Oct. 1, 1890. 



54 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. '90. 





APPENDIX. 






Teachers. — 1890-91. 


Class. 


Miss E. M. Fullington, 




First. 


Miss C. Lacey, . 






Second. 


Miss G. A. Cheney, . 




. 


Third. 


Miss F. G. Bissett, . 




. 


Fourth. 


Mrs. J. J. Prentiss, . 




. . 


Fifth. 


Mrs. H. E. Darte, 






Sixth. 


Miss F. J. Dyer, 






Seventh. 


Miss E. E. Greene, . 






Kindergarten. 


Mr. M. B. Tinker, . 




. 


Manual training 



School Calendar. — 1890-91 . 

Fall term Ends Oct. 31. 

Winter term begins Nov. 10 ; ends Jan. 30. 

Spring term begins Feb. 9 ; ends May 1. 

Summer term begins May 11 ; ends July 24. 

Fall term begins Aug. 10 ; ends Oct. 30. 

Number of school weeks in the year, 47 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOK BOYS 



WESTBOROUGH. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools, 

In presenting to you my third annual report, permit me 
to call attention to No. 1 of the subjoined tables, which 
without explanation may be misleading. The total of 295 
represents so many different boys, whereas in former reports 
a boy present at the beginning of the year and released and 
returned during the year has been reported twice. Such 
repeated names would make this total eight larger than it 
appears. As these changes in the school are shown in 
Table No. 2, the exact state of the school is better repre- 
sented by omitting such releases and returns from No. 1. 

The apparent progress of the boys present during the 
twelve months just ended has been good. The school work 
has been vigorous and stimulating, and its effect upon the 
pupils, if not all that could be desired, has been encouraging 
to me and creditable to the band of faithful teachers. The 
difficulties and disadvantages under which they labor are 
disheartening, but the work done has in amount and thor- 
oughness been that of which no school need be ashamed. 
The manner and results of this work are clearly set forth in 
the report of the principal. 

Our manual training, following the Swedish system, has, 
under the skillful direction of Miss Anna Wilcox, as fully 
realized the expectation expressed a year ago as the time 
intervening could permit. It has been found of great value 
in stimulating mental activity and exciting interest in appar- 
ently stupid boys. It demands steadiness of hand, persist- 
ence, and the struggle after and attainment of a tolerably 
perfect form. It falls into line admirably as an important 
helper in the moral upbuilding, and not unfrequently furnishes 
the key to a boy's mental make-up. 



58 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

To promote in some degree interest in farming, an allot- 
ment of land was last spring made to each family, on which 
might be grown the vegetables to be used at each of the 
houses. The result has justified the experiment, both in an 
increase of garden products and in wide-spread interest 
among the boys in the proper manner of culture and growth 
of the vegetables which they themselves were to enjoy. The 
possibilities of teaching practical agriculture in this way I 
believe to be considerable. The heel-cutting industry has 
been a marked success, both in developing efficiency in the 
boys employed and in the pecuniary return. Seven boys on 
an average have worked at this. 

The printing department has done more and better work 
this year than ever before. The department is greatly 
embarrassed by the want of a good press and more type. 
Five hundred dollars expended in increased appliances would 
be an advantageous outlay. 

The enlarged quarters of the sewing department, although 
not available until the last of March, made it possible to 
manufacture, in addition to the usual number of articles, 
over five hundred pairs of pantaloons. 

Owing to the demands of the new building, the boys 
have done an unusual amount of out-of-door labor. As a 
consequence, comparatively little chair seating has been done 
during the last six months. 

Last May guns were procured and the drill in the manual 
of arms commenced. The proficiency of the boys under the 
adverse circumstances of new arrivals every week and the 
departure of the most experienced at short intervals, is quite 
remarkable, and is complimentary to Drill-master Fayer- 
weather. The drill as a means of physical culture is good, 
but it is incomplete. Educational gymnastics purely for the 
purpose of developing a healthy body are receiving a large 
amount of attention from discriminating educators. Among 
the Lyman School boys will be found a larger percentage 
of unsymmetrically developed bodies than in a similar num- 
ber taken from other classes. It seems to me wise to 
introduce such exercises as seem calculated to bring about 
the proper physical development. To this end I would 
recommend that such instruction be furnished as shall enable 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 59 

the masters of the several families to give the necessary 
instruction to the boys under their care, or that a military 
instructor be employed, competent to perform this work. 

The buildings of the school have at present no adequate 
protection against fire. It is to be hoped that no calamity 
of this nature will befall, for our water supply would be 
found insignificant in fighting any considerable fire. Some 
provision for storing and distributing an abundant supply 
in the event of such an emergency should be made without 
delay. The outlay to effect this end would require a special 
appropriation. 

The coal sheds are at present located on the Old Colony 
Railroad, two and one-half miles distant. The nearest point 
on the Boston and Albany is scarcely more than a mile away. 
Our present consumption is five hundred tons of coal per 
year. The cost of hauling is not far from one dollar a ton. 
It would effect a considerable saving in money, sufficient to 
cover in four or five years all expense of removing sheds, to 
relocate them upon the Boston and Albany Railroad. 

Viewing the work of the school as a whole, I think I am 
warranted in saying that some progress has been made dur- 
ing the past year. On the other hand, it is true that the 
average of intelligence and good physique on the part of 
those committed has been perceptibly lower this year than 
last. My officers have co-operated cheerfully and earnestly 
with me to promote the welfare of the school. I have every 
reason also to be grateful to the trustees for their generous 
support and encouragement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. F. CHAPIN, 

Superintendent. 



60 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Table No. 1. 

Showing the Number received and discharged, and the General 

Condition of the School, for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1890. 

Boys in school Sept. 30, 1889, ....... 184 

Eeceiyed. — Since committed, 92 

Returned from places, 19 111 

Whole number in school during the year, . . • . . 295 

Released. — On probation to parents, 44 

On probation to others, . . . . .45 

To Massachusetts Reformatory, . . 6 

To State Farm, Bridgewater, .... 1 

To accompany parents out of the State, . . 2 

State Primary School, 1 

As unfit subjects, 4 

By elopement, ....... 6 

Died, 1 110 



Remaining in school Sept. 30, 1890, 



185 



Table No. 2. 

Showing the Admissions, Number discharged, and Average Number 
of Each Month. 



MONTHS. 


Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Average No. 


1889. 








October, 


7 


10 


183.03 


November, 


20 


10 


185.73 


December, . . . 


5 


7 


187.71 


1890. 








January, 


9 


3 


190.77 


February, 






. 






10 


11 


195.53 


March, 






, 






13 


17 


192.61 


April, . 












11 


12 


189.60 


May, . 






. 






12 


11 


189.48 


June, . 






, 






8 


20 


182.73 


July, . 












9 


11 


178.71 


August, 












11 


7 


178.38 


September, 












15 


10 


183.23 


Totals, 












130 


129 


186.46 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



61 



Table No. 3. 

SJiowing the Commitments from the Several Counties the Past Year 

and previously. 



COUNTIES. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, .... 




50 


50 


Berkshire, 








3 


215 


218 


Bristol, 








11 


554 


565 


Dukes, 








- 


13 


13 


Essex, . 








11 


1,002 


1,013 


Franklin, . 








- 


53 


53 


Hampden, 








12 


349 


361 


Hampshire, 








3 


75 


78- 


Middlesex, 








20 


1,087 


1,107 


Nantucket, 








-■ 


16 


16 


Norfolk, . 








1 


939 


940 


Plymouth, 








1 


115 


116 


Suffolk, . 








17 


1,227 


1,244 


Worcester, 








13 


682 


695 


Totals, 






• 


92 


6,377 


6,469 



Table No. 4. 

SJiowing Nativity of Parents of Boys committed during tJie Year. 

Fathers American born, 7 

Mothers American born, 4 

Fathers foreign born, 5 

Mothers foreign born, 9 

Both parents American born, 22 

Both parents foreign born, 52 

Unknown, 11 



Slioiving Nativity of Boys committed during tJie Year. 

Born in the United States, 77 

Foreign born (10 in Canada), 14 

Unknown, 1 



92 



62 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Table No. 5. 

Showing by what Authority the Commitments have been made the 

Past Year. 





COMMITMENTS. 


Past Year. 


By district court, . 
municipal court, 
police court, . 
superior court, 
trial justices, . 




42 
6 

41 
1 

2 


Total, . 


92 



Table No. 6. 
Showing Age of Boys when Committed. 



AGE. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Six, 




5 


5 


Seven, 








- 


25 


25 


Eight, . 








1 


117 


118 


Nine, 








- 


235 


235 


Ten, . 








2 


444 


446 


Eleven, 








3 


644 


647 


Twelve, . 








10 


739 


749 


Thirteen, . 








22 


891 


913 


Fourteen, 








53 


1,153 


1,206 


Fifteen, . 








1 


897 


898 


Sixteen, . 








- 


930 


930 


Seventeen, 








- 


280 


280 


Eighteen and over, 








- 


59 


59 


Unknown, 








- 


31 


31 


Total, 








92 


6,450 


6,542 



Average age of boys, 13.15. 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



63 



Table No. 7. 

Showing the Domestic Condition of Boys who have been Inmates 

of the School during Year. 



CONDITION. 



Number. 



Had parents, . . . 




162 


no parents, 




24 


father, . . . . _ . 




48 


mother, . . 




58 


step-father, 




14 


step-mother, . . 




21 


intemperate father, 




95 


intemperate mother, 




12 


both parents intemperate, .... 




41 


parents separated, 




13 


attended church, . . . .-.'.. 




251 


never attended church, .... 




10 


never attended school, .... 




1 


not attended school within one year, . 




43 


two years, 




22 


three years, 




13 


been arrested before, 




191 


been inmates of other institutions, 




62 


used intoxicating liquor, .... 




46 


used tobacco (mostly cigarettes), 




190 


Were employed in mill or otherwise when arrested, 




96 


idle, 




105 


attending school, 




75 


Could not read or write, . . 




12 


Parents owning residence, 




23 


Members of family had been arrested, 




79 



64 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Table No. 8. 

Shoivs the Length of Time the Boys who have left the Past Year 
have spent in the School since Commitment. 



3 months or less, 






. 6 


2 years 3 months, 


. 2 


4 months, 






. 1 


2 « 4 


. 1 


5 " 






. - 


2 " 5 


. - 


6 






. 1 


,2 " 6 


. 1 


7 






• - 


2 « 7 


. 1 


8 






. 1 


2 " 8 


. - 


9 






. 1 


2 » 9 


. 1 


10 






. 2 


2 " 10 




11 






. 1 


2 " 11 


. 1 


1 year, . 






. 3 


3 years, . 


. 2 


1 " 1 month, 






. 1 


3 " 1 month, 




1 " 2 months, 






. 3 


3 " 2 months, 


. 2 


1 " 3 






2 


3 " 3 


" 


. 1 


1 " 4 






5 


3 " 4 


" 


. 1 


1 " 5 






10 


3 " 5 


.i 


. . - 


1 " 6 






13 


3 " 6 


' 


. - 


1 " 7 






15 


3 " 7 


t 


. 


1 " 8 






6 


3 « 8 


< 


• - 


1 " 9 






12 


3 " 9 


' 


. - 


1 " 10 






4 


3 " 10 


' 


. - 


1 " 11 






4 


3 " 11 


< 


-. - 


2 years, . 






1 


4 years and more, . 


. - 


2 " 1 month, 






1 







2 " 2 months, 






4 


Total, 


. 110 


Average ti 


me s 


pent 


in the 


institution, 18. 


38mor 


iths.j 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



65 



Table No. 9. 

Comparative Table, showing Average Numbers, New Commit- 
ments, etc., for a Period of Ten Years. 





Average 


New Com- 


Returned 
for any 
Cause. 


Placed on 


Discharged 




Number. 


mitments. 


Probation. 


Otherwise. 


1880-81, 








176.60 


71 


76 


92 


107 


1881-82, 








113.61 


108 


39 


146 


11 


1882-83, 








114.28 


100 


14 


125 


19 


1883-84, 








128.80 


•j-138 


33 


81 


43 


1884-85,* 








112.18 


64 


33 


•81 


71 


1885-86, 








92.82 


59 


44 


90 


18 


1886-87, 








104.32 


93 


31 


80 


16 


1887-88, 








127.24, 


99 


38 


91 


22 


1888-89, 








168.23 


124 


39 


93 


19 


1889-90, 








186.46 


92 


19 


89 


16 


Average f c 


rlO; 


fears 


» 


132.45 


94.8 


36.6 


94.8 


34.2 



* April, 1885, removed to present location. 

f First year after the reduction of the age for admission from seventeen to four- 
teen years. 



66 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Report of Sewing Room for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1890. 



Articles Made. 


Articles Repaired. 


Aprons, 






75 


Aprons, 






7 


Bed spreads, 






150 


Bed spreads, 






16 


Braces, . 






61 


Blankets, 






49 


Caps, . 






108 


Braces, . 






3 


Dish cloths, . 






2 


Horse blankets, 






1 


Dish towels, 






92 


Jackets, 






90 


Holders, 






7 


Napkins, 






13 


Napkins, 






336 


Pantaloons, . 






97 


Pantaloons, . 






545 


Pillow slips, 






210 


Pillow slips, 






215 


Robes, . 






3 


Sheets, . 






96 


Sheets, . 






134 


Shirts, . 






757 


Shirts, . 






220 


Table cloths, 






18 


Stockings, pairs, 






42 


Towels, 






183 


Table cloths, 






53 




Towels, 






138 




Vests, . 






2 


Total, . 2,645 


Total, . 






1,078 


Average number of boys employed, 






5 


Number of differc 


mt b( 


)ys e 


oaployed 


, • • 






13 



Laundry Work for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1890. 



Number pieces washed, 


136,484 


" " ironed, 


103,837 


" " starched, 


6,812 


Average number of boys employed, 


21 


Number of different boys employed, 


72 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 67 



PEINCIPAL'S REPOKT. 



To the Superintendent of the Lyman School for Boys. 

We have just closed a year in which much earnest labor 
has been expended, and results more nearly commensurate 
with such efforts have been attained. 

We have had in attendance during the year 295 different 
boys, and an average number of 186.46. Of these, especially 
those who entered during the year, a larger proportion 
than formerly were of a lower grade of scholarship. This 
necessitated a still closer grading of the school as a whole, 
in order that the much-needed foundation work could be 
done advantageously. This was accomplished by placing 
all who were unable to read in the Third Reader in one 
family, and arranging for them a programme suited to their 
mental needs, omitting physiology, civil government and 
history. This arrangement has also given the other teachers 
more time to devote to the A and B classes. 

The programme as reported a year ago has been followed 
during the past year. 

In arithmetic the interest on the part of the majoritj^ has 
been on the increase, and the written examinations from 
month to month have shown steady improvement. 

The study of American history, as pursued, has had a 
tendency to interest the boys in quite a different class of 
writings from those formerly enjoyed by them. This is 
plainly shown by the number of books, historical and 
biographical, drawn from the library by the pupils. Books 
of travels, the lives of statesmen, inventors, soldiers, etc., 
are now more eagerly read by many than were the volumes 
of trashy literature a year ago by the same. After a period 
or subject in history, physiology or civil government, has 
been thoroughly studied by a class, a written summary of it 
has been required from each member ; which exercise has not 



68 PEIMAEY AND EEFOEM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

only been a test of memory and thoroughness, but has also 
given practice in writing, spelling and the correct use of 
language. A number of these articles have appeared in the 
" Enterprise," our school paper; and proud indeed is the 
boy whose production has been thus favored. 

The observation lessons, while they have trained the eye 
to notice objects worthy of attention, have seemed also to 
develop in most of the boys a love for the beautiful in 
nature; and, as a result, they have collected, pressed and 
mounted a large variety of leaves and flowers. Oral and 
written descriptions of the same have also been given during 
the observation period, though the other work has been 
done during play-hours. ^ 

In drawing, those who had finished the work of the first 
and second primary years of the Prang system, and who 
seemed to understand the work sufficiently well to advance, 
were allowed, toward the close of the year, to take Book 
No. L, Shorter Course. They are now ready for No. II. 
of the same course; while the others, with the new-comers, 
are to take the same work again ; and no boy is to enter the 
manual training class till he has completed three months' 
work in drawing, which now includes the first primary 
year's work. 

During the past year several entertainments, consisting of 
recitations, songs and choruses, were given, every school 
contributing its share. The music furnished each time was 
first written from dictation, then read by note, being part of 
the daily school exercises. With what success the pieces 
were rendered, the visitors present on those occasions attested 
by their compliments and the pleasure ma-nifested. 

The work of each week has been thoroughly planned and 
afterward discussed at the regular weekly meeting of the 
teachers. By this means there is uniformity of action, and 
each teacher is held responsible for the success of her classes. 

For your continued kindness you have my sincere thanks. 

Eespectfully, 



Westborough, Oct. 1, 1890. 



MAEY L. PETTIT, 

Principal 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



69 



School 


Programme. — 1890-1891. 




Afternoon. 


2-2.25, . 


Drawing. 


2.25-3.25, . 


Arithmetic. 


3.25-3.30, . 


Calisthenics. 


3.30-3.50, . 


Music. 


3.50-4, 


Spelling. 


4-4.10, . 


Penmanship. 


4.10-4.30, . 


Observation lesson. 




Evening. 


6-6.15, . 


Physiology, — Civil Government 


6.15-6.45, . 


Geography, — History. 


6.45-7, 


Lauguage. 


7-7.30, . 


Reading, 



70 PKIMARY AND KEFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



1889 



1890 



October, received from the State Trea 


November, " 


I a 


December, " ' 


I 


January, " 


t u 


February, " 


; l( 


March, " 


' 


April, " 


. 


May, 


t u 


June, " 


' " 


July, 


' 


August, " 


; it 


September, " 


II 





$2,621 12 




3,573 90 




2,555 76 




3,472 99 




3,930 27 




4,204 48 




3,270 22 




3,064 98 




2,787 39 




4,513 80 




3,600 08 




3,550 66 




$41,145 65 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 

1889 — October, f 2,621 12 

November, . ....'. 3,573 90 

December, 2,555 76 

1890 — January, . 3,472 99 

February, 3,930 27 

March, . 4,204 48 

April, 3,270 22 

May, 3,064 98 

June, 2,787 39 

July, 4,513 80 

August, 3,600 08 

September, 3,550 66 

$41,145 65 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 71 

Amount drawn from State Treasury. 
Special Appropriation (Acts of 1890, Chap. 65). 

1890 — August, $637 81 

September, 4,109 60 

$4,747 41 

Amount drawn from State Treasury. 

Deficiency Appropriation for Current Expenses, 1889. 

1890 — February, . . . ... . ' . . . $ 1,276 96 



Amount drawn from State Treasury. 
Special Appropriation for Bepairs on Cobb Farm, (Wilson Farm). 

1889 — November, $324 87 

1890 — May, . 142 97 

$467 84 

Expenditures. 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Special Appropriation 
(Acts of 1890, Chap. 65). 

1890 — August, $637 81 

September, 4,109 60 

$4,747 41 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Deficiency Appropria- 
tion, — Current Expenses, 1889. 
1890 — February, $1,276 96 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Bepairs on Cobb 
Farm (Wilson Farm). 

1889 — November, $324 87 

1890 — May, . 142 97 

$467 84 



72 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Expenditures for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1890. 

Salaries of officers and employees, . . . .$15,492 71 
Wages of other persons temporarily employed, . 546 94 

$16,039 65 

Provisions and grocery supplies, including — 

Meat, $1,348 23 

Fish, 464 58 

Eggs, 196 99 

Lard, 96 13 

Potatoes, . 257 25 

Fruit and vegetables, 169 67 

Bread, 3,869 88 

Flour and cereals, 384 70 

Beans and peas, 287 34 

Ice, 173 19 

Tea, coffee, cereal coffee and chocolate, . . 205 10 

Sugar and molasses, 635 40 

Butter and cheese, 741 18 

Salt and other spices, 41 48 

Nuts and candy, 17 50 

Soap and other washing material, . . . 326 69 
Other groceries and provisions, . . . 11 83 

9,227 14 

Clothing of all kinds, 2,180 15 

Fuel and lights, 3,572 22 

Medicines and medical supplies, 142 25 

Furniture, beds and bedding, 2,407 57 

School property, books and supplies, 704 35 

Ordinary repairs, . . . 2,117 80 

Horse and cattle shoeing, 158 05 

Express, freight and passenger fares, 647 48 

Stationery, postage, telegrams and newspapers, . . . 430 84 
Seeds, plants and fertilizers, farm tools and repairing same, . 1,173 39 

Water, 450 00 

Printing material, 93 16 

Live stock, 1,035 50 

Grain, feed and meal for stock, 749 10 

Burial, 17 00 



$41,145 65 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



73 



Superintendents Report of Cash Transactions. 







Farm 
Produce 

Sales. 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Sales. 


Labor 

of 
Boys. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


1889. 














October, 


Received casb from, . 


$2 00 


$5 50 


- 


- 


$7 50 


November, . 


<< ii << 


6 49 


19 44 


- 


$6 50 


32 43 


December, . 


., ;, . 


5 29 


2 38 


- 


30 67 


38 34 


1890. 














January, 


ii ii n 


3 29 


4 60 


$14 25 


10 31 


32 45 


February, . 


.. <i . 


9 37 


- 


4 35 


8 00 


21 72 


Marcb, . 


,< ., . 


84 36 


19 04 


1 18 


6 00 


110 58 


April, . 


.. .1 . 


37 72 


75 25 


50 


8 00 


121 47 


May, . . 


" " • 


23 92 


- 


3 75 


8 00 


35 67 


June, . 


" •' . 


192 70 


3 15 


90 


7 16 


203 91 


July, . 


i< ., . 


86 48 


- 


2 50 


- 


88 98 


August, 


<i 


27 06 


- 


7 50 


- 


34 56 


September, . 




- 


2 50 


793 58 


- 


796 08 


Totals, 


$478 68 


$131 86 


$828 51 


$84 64 


$1,523 69 



Superintendent s Report of Cash Transactions. — Disbursements. 







Farm 

Produce 

Sales. 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Sales. 


Labor 

of 
Boys. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


1889. 














October, 


Paid State Treasurer, . 


$2 00 


$5 50 


- 


- 


$7 50 


November, . 


ii it ii 


6 49 


19 44 


- 


$6 50 


32 43 


December, . 


,. ii i, . 


5 29 


2 38 


- 


30 67 


38 34 


1890. 














January, 


,« 


3 29 


4 60 


$14 25 


10 31 


32 45 


February, 


.< „ „ . 


9 37 


- 


4 35 


8 00 


21 72 


March, . 


ii ii ii 


84 36 


19 04 


1 18 


6 00 


110 58 


April, . 


ii ii ii 


37 72 


75 25 


50 


8 00 


121 47 


May, 


,. .< ,i . 


23 92 


- 


3 75 


8 00 


35 67 


June, . 


ii ii ii 


192 70 


3 15 


90 


7 16 


203 91 


July, . 


ii ii ii 


86 48 


- 


2 50 


- 


88 98 


August, 


ii ii it 


27 06 


- 


7 50 


- 


34 56 


September, . 


ii ii it 


- 


2 50 


793 58 


- 


796 08 


Totals, 


$478 68 


$131 86 


$828 51 


$84 64 


$1,523 69 



74 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



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1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 75 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

The increased amount of sickness shown by the report 
herein presented was partly due to exceptional causes, and 
partly to the increased number of weakly boys in the school. 

In October, typhoid fever, a rare disease here, caused the 
death of Berry, the first fatal sickness since 1886. 

In December, Boyce was taken with scarlet-fever ; for 
thirty-five days he was isolated, and measures to prevent 
extension of the disease employed. He made a good 
recovery, and no other case occurred. 

In the same month "La Grippe" invaded the school, and 
fourteen cases came to the hospital before Boyce occupied 
it ; one hundred and eighteen occurring after were cared for 
in their respective families. 

The appended table shows the diseases presented for treat- 
ment, and their distribution through the year. It is only 
fair to say that many of these cases were mild and of short 
duration. 

There is but little sickness at present, and no reason to 
anticipate more than the usual amount. 



76 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 







1889 


- 


1890. 


A 




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60 

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H 


Abscess, 




_ 


1 








1 










1 


3 


Asthma, . 


_ 


— 


- 


- 


1 


l 












1 


3 


Bronchitis, 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


2 


5 


Burns, . 


1 


- 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


Canker, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


l 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


2 


_ 


4 


Colds, . 


2 


2 


4 


1 


3 


l 


3 


8 


1 


_ 


1 


7 


33 


Conjunctivitis, 


1 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


- 


1 


4 


Constipation, . 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


4 


Colic, 


- 


1 


- 


- 


— ■ 


- 


1 


- 


_ 


1 


- 


- 


3 


Congestion of brain, 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


l 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


Debility, 


1 - 


1 


2 


- 


1 


l 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


7 


Diarrhoea, 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


2 


- 


4 


Dislocation, . 
























1 


1 


Enuresis, 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


l 


- 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


3 


Enlarged glands, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


l 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


Epistaxis, 


— 


1 






















1 


Epilepsy, 






















1 


- 


1 


Fever (simple), 


2 


1 


5 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


" (typhoid), . 


1 
























1 


" (intermittent), 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


? 


Fracture, 






















1 


- 


Furuncle, 


_ 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


2 


4 


Heart disease, 


_ 


_ 


_ 


' _ 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


Indigestion, . 


1 


1 


3 


- 


1 


- 


1 


- 


1 


7 


3 


3 


21 


Inflamed gums, 


| - 


1 


1 
















2 


- 


4 


Laryngitis, 
























1 


1 


" La Grippe," 


- 


- 


14 


118 


















132 


Myalgia, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Neuralgia, 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


l 


2 


3 


- 


- 


3 


5 


15 


Otalgia, . 


- 


- 


1 


- 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


2 


Otitis, . 


- 


- 


1 


- 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


- 


_ 


3 


Onychia, 






















1 


_ 


1 


Periostitis, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


_ 


- 


1 


1 


_ 


- 


_ 


3 


Pneumonia, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


1 


- 


_ 


_ 


- 


1 


Poisoned, 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


3 


1 


2 


5 


1 


12 


Paralysis, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


l 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


Rheumatism, . 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


1 


1 


1 


9 


Scarlet-fever, . 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


Skin disease, . 


2 


3 


1 


- 


1 


4 


2 


1 


2 


_ 


2 


2 


20 


Sore throat, . 


2 


2 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


2 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


1 


11 


Sprains, . 


1 


3 


- 


_ 


- 


_ 


1 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


7 


Sores, 


1 


- 


1 


- 


- 


_ 


2 


2 


_ 


2 


2 


1 


11 


Tonsillitis, . 


6 


6 


9 


_ 


- 


2 


3 


4 


1 


_ 


2 


_ 


33 


Ulcers, . 


- 


2 






















2 


Varicose veins, 






















1 


_ 


1 


Wounds, 


1 


2 


2 


_ 


2 


1 


2 


2 






7 


3 


22 


Worms, . 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


_ 


1 


Found not sick, 


- 


1 


3 


- 


3 


1 


3 


2 


- 


4 


2 


- 


19 


Totals, . 


21 


36 


54 


119 


18 


18 


27 


34 


15 


19 


41 


36 


436 


Number of visits, . 


19 


13 


23 


46 


12 


11 


14 


15 


11 


10 


18 


16 


208 



Number of days' sickness in the hospital, 284. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. E. COREY, Physician. 



Westborough, Sept. 30, 1890. 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 77 



FAEMER'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the Lyman School for Boys. 

I herewith present you my report for the year ending- 
Sept. 30, 1890. 

The past year has been favorable for all crops, with the 
exception of late varieties of potatoes and cabbage, which 
were pinched by a severe drought at mid-summer. The hay 
crop was large and well secured. Nine acres have been 
seeded down the past season, which will greatly increase 
our hay crop another year. The crop both of strawberries 
and blackberries has been unusually large, a large amount 
having been sold, besides all that were wanted for home use. 

All farm work and hauling coal, besides a great amount 
of work for new building, have been done with our own 
teams. A valuable addition to our teams has been made by 
a large pair of black Percherons in place of the old pair. 

Seven young cows have been added to our herd, in place 
of those that were past their usefulness. 

Improvements have been made in various directions, such 
as building new roads, clearing new land and cleaning up 
the roadside. 

In conclusion, I wish to return my sincere thanks to you 
for advice and hearty co-operation in all the work throughout 
the year ; also to the masters for their kind and courteous 
treatment. 

The annexed schedule shows the production of the farm. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. F. McFARLAND. 

Westborough, Mass., Sept. 30, 1890. 



78 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 



Summary of Farm Account for Twelve Months, ending Sept. 

30, 1890. 

Dr. 

Live stock and farm implements, as appraised 

Sept. 30, 1889, f 3,216 39 

Board, 286 00 

Farm tools, and repairs to same, .... 664 08 

Fertilizer, 356 80 

Grain and meal, 613 30 

Horse and cattle shoeing, ..... 129 48 

Incidentals, . . 3 75 

Labor, boys', . / 418 75 

Live stock, 1,035 50 

Ordinary repairs, 62 00 

Seeds and plants, 117 19 

Veterinary service and medicine, .... 38 17 

Wages, pay-roll, . . . ... . . 542 59 

Water, 20 00 

$7,504 00 

Apparent net gain for twelve months, 662 29 



Live stock, agricultural implements and farm pro- 
duce on hand, as appraised Sept. 30, 1890, . $6,786 61 

Live stock, agricultural implements and farm pro- 
duce on hand, as appraised Sept. 30, 1889, . 5,486 49 



Apparent gain in value of live stock, agricultural 

implements and farm produce on hand, . . $1,300 12 

Apparent net gain for twelve months, . . . 662 29 

Total apparent net gain for twelve months, . . $1,962 41 



$8,166 29 



Cr. 



Apples, 16 bushels, . 
Asparagus, 35| dozen bunches, 
Beans, shell, 16| bushels, 
Beans, string, 29J bushels 
Beef, 3,2191 pounds, 
Beet greens, 15 \ bushels, 
Beets, 25| bushels, . 
Blackberries, 355 quarts, 



ept. 30, 1889, 




|2,270 10 
13 25 


h 






44 59 








13 88 








21 94 








241 00 








5 52 








19 79 








36 96 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



79 



Cabbage, 3,446 heads, 

Carrots, 4±- bushels, 

Cash for asparagus, 18 dozen, 

Cash for blackberries, 787 quarts, 

Cash for calf-skins, . 

Cash for calves sold, 3, . 

Cash for horses, 

Cash for pease, 34 bushels, 

Cash for raspberries, 91 quarts, 

Cash for service of stock, 

Cash for strawberries, 1,656 quarts, 

Cash for swill, 

Cauliflower, 30 heads, 

Crab apples, i bushel, 

Cucumbers, 65 dozen, 

Cucumbers for pickling, 9| bushels, 

Currants, 7 quarts, . 

Eggs, 60 dozen, 

Garden produce, unclassified, estimate, 

Hides and tallow exchanged for beef, 

Labor for institution, men and teams, 

Lettuce, lOOf dozen, 

Milk, 49,626 quarts, 

Muskmelons, 300, . 

Onions, 5 T 5 g bushels, 

Parsnips, | bushel, . 

Pears, 8 bushels, 

Pease, 1101 bushels, 

Pork, 2,600 pounds, 

Potatoes, 515| bushels, 

Radishes, 3341 dozen, 

Raspberries, 168 quarts, 

Rhubarb, . 

Spinach, lOf bushels, 

Squash, summer, b\ barrels, 

Squash, winter, 20 pounds, 

Strawberries, 796 quarts, 

Sweet corn, 515 dozen ears, 

Tomatoes, 45^ bushels, . 

Turnips, 23| bushels, 

Watermelons, 193, . 



$133 03 


4 


38 


25 


88 


78 


58 


1 


25 


5 


00 


75 


00 


31 


15 


12 


82 


2 


00 


171 


20 


12 


30 


4 


55 




75 


9 


24 


34 75 




84 


16 


18 


25 


00 


10 


51 


2,204 


72 


14 


59 


1,498 


43 


30 


00 


7 


12 


1 


00 


10 


00 


121 


06 


156 


00 


414 


40 


113 


28 


22 


35 


3 00 


3 


77 


7 


23 




30 


73 


65 


78 


25 


34 


25 


22 50 


28 


95 



f8,166 29 



80 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Produce of the Farm on Hand Oct. 1, 1890, and not delivered 

at School. 

Apples, 16 barrels, 
Beets, 107 bushels, 
Carrots, 87 bushels, 
Celery, . 

Corn, 125 bushels, . 
Corn fodder, 91 tons, 
Ensilage, 60 tons, . 
Hay, English, 32 tons, 
Hay, meadow, 4 tons, 
Hay, stock, 14 tons, 
Oats, 3| tons, . 
Oats and hay (mixed) , 1 

ton, . * . . . 8 00 $1,764 04 



$40 00 


32 


10 


21 


75 


6 


00 


77 


50 


57 


00 


240 


00 


480 00. 


32 


00 


168 


00 


42 


00 


8 


00 



Onions, 225 bushels, 


$202 50 


Parsnips, 56 bushels, 


28 00 


Peppers, 3 bushels, 


3 00 


Pop-corn, 2 bushels, 


3 00 


Pumpkins, 1 ton, . 


10 00 


Salsify, . 


5 00 


Squash, 6,250 pounds, 


78 12 


Sweet corn, 56 bushels, 


34 72 


Turnips, 385 bushels, 


57 75 


Turnips, Swedish, 688 




bushels, 


137 60 



Asparagus, 
Blackberries, . 
Calf-skins, 
Calves, 
Horses, 
Pease, 

Raspberries, 
Service of stock, 
Strawberries, . 



Bull, one, 
Calves, six, . 
Cows, nineteen, . 
Fowls, twenty-seven, 
Hogs, twenty-four, 
Horse, "Major, Jr.," 
Horse, " Jerry," . 





Farm 


Sales. 




. $25 88 


Swill, 


. $12 30 




78 58 
1 25 










$415 18 




5 00 


Beets (crop of 1889), 


2 93 




75 00 


Cabbage (crop of 1889), 


. 74 64 




31 15 


Hay (crop of 1889) , . 


. 32 36 




12 82 


Parsnips (crop of 1889) , 


6 50 




2 00 
171 20 










$531 61 


Live 


Stock. 




. $100 00 


Horses, one pair, bay, . 


$450 00 


80 00 


Horses, one pair, black, 


550 00' 


855 00 


Oxen, two yoke, . 


220 00 


13 50 


Steer, one, . 


65 00 


180 00 
200 00 








$2,863 50 




150 00 







Farming implements, including wagons, machines, tools, etc , $2,736 57 



Summary. 

Produce on hand, $1,764 04 

Produce sold, 415 18 

Produce consumed, 3,276 29 

$5,455 51 

Live stock, 2,863 50 

Agricultural implements, . . . . . . . . 2,736 57 

$11,055 58 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



81 



SUMMAET. 





Real Estat 


E. 




Fifty-eight acres tillage, . 


. |10,800 00 




Thirty-six acres pasturage, 


1,800 00 




Brady land, ..... 


. 1,300 00 




Willow Park land, .... 


1,500 00 




Wilson land, seventy-two acres, 


4,000 00 


§19,400 00 






Buildings. 






Suj:)erinten dent's house, 


. $8,000 00 




" Theodore Lyman Hall," 






. 38,000 00 




" Hillside Cottage," . 






. 15,000 00 




" Maple Cottage," 






3,500 00 




"Willow Park,". 






5,600 00 




" Wayside Cottage," . 






5,500 00 




Chapel, 






3,700 00 




Farm barn and sheds, 






1,200 00 




Horse barn, 






2,000 00 




Willow Park hall, 






400 00 




Willow Park barn, 






100 00 




Coal sheds, . 






400 00 


83.400 00 



Personal Estate. 
Beds and bedding, inmates', 
Carriages and agricultural implements, . 

Dry goods, 

Drugs, medicines and surgical instruments, 



Carried forward, . . . . . . $8,234 38 $102,800 00 



$1,920 81 


2,736 57 


549 32 


300 00 



82 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Brought forward, . $8,234 38 $102,800 00 

Fuel and oil, ... , 2,227 68 

Library, . 500 00 

Live stock, . 2,863 50 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . 2,736 95 

Other furniture, inmates 1 , . . 1,433 00 

Personal property superintendent's department, 10,387 5Q 
Provisions and groceries, . . . 739 81 

Produce on hand, 2,105 44 

Ready-made clothing, . . . 2,933 25 



31,433 89 



Total, $134,233 89 



GEO. T. FAYERWEATHER, 
G. P. HEATH, 

Appraisers. 

A true copy. Attest: T. F. Chapin, Supt. 
WESTBORorGH, Sept. 30, 1890. 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



83 



LIST OF SALAKIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



Theodore F. Chapin, superintendent, 

Mrs. T. F. Chapin, matron, 

George F. Bullard, assistant superintendent, 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Howe, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. I. T. Swift, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Keith, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Jones, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Howard, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Perkins, charge of family, 

F. E. Corey, M.D., physician, 

Miss Carrie Dana, teacher, 

Miss Emma F. Newton, . 

Miss Eliza M. Taylor, 

Mrs. Florence A. Russell, . 

Mrs. Carrie E. Perry, 

Miss Louisa J. Taylor, 

M. Everett Howard, teacher of printing, 

Miss Fannie S. Mitchell, seamstress, 

Mrs. G. F. Bullard, housekeeper, superintendent's house, 

Miss Mary Custer, nurse, .... 

Miss Mabel B. Mitchell, assistant matron, 

Miss Mae E. Hartford, assistant matron, . 

Mrs. B. F. McFarland, assistant matron, . 

Mrs. Edith Howard, assistant matron, 

Miss Inez E. Howard, assistant matron, . 

Miss Francis C. Ela, assistant matron, 

James W. Clark, engineer, 

Wm. H. Powers, carpenter, $1.50 per day. 

John H. Cummings, truant officer, . 

John T. Perkins, steward, 

Harlan M. Thompson, watchman, . 

Benjamin F. McFarland, farmer, 

Charles E. Spooner, assistant farmer, 



,800 00 


400 00 


600 00 


700 00 


800 00 


800 00 


800 00 


800 00 


700 00 


200 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


400 00 


250 00 


300 00 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


200 00 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


900 00 


500 00 


400 00 


400 00 


300 00 


240 00 



84 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 






•2, 



O 



03 






OQ 



Compensation. 


CHMHO(M00C0C0a>W<O*0O03OOa>NOO5ClOOO 
OOCOO(NnOHOT-i(MiOH(MO©^OiOCOHNHOOGOH 

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CDrM^rH------- CBO------------ 

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Theodore F. Chapin, 
Mrs. T. F. Chapin, 
Geo. F. Bullard, . 
Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Howe, . 
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Norton, . 
Mr. and Mrs. I. T. Swift, . 
Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Robertson, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Keith, . 
Mr. and Mrs. L, C. Jones, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Howard, 
Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Perkins, . 
F. E. Corey, M.D., 
Miss Carrie Dana, . . . 
Miss Emma F. Newton, 
Miss Bertha C. Leech, . 
Miss Flora E. Loomis, . 
Miss Flora E. Strout, . 
Miss Ella E. Glover, . 
Miss Helen De L. Hobbs, 
Miss Eliza M. Taylor, . 
Miss Eleanor B. Lamprey, . 
Mrs. Florence A. Russell, 
Miss Carrie E. Perry, . 
Miss Agnes C. Bennett, . 
Miss Louisa J. Taylor, . 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



85 



HNCOOHHHOCOOO^COH050iOHH(MH^OOOC005HW 
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86 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Schedule of Persons temporarily employed at the Lyman School for 
Boys within the Year ending Sept. 30, 1890. 



Chaplains, ..... 




$270 00 


Thayer & Smith, . 






Painters, 


70 00 


J. S. Smith, 






Painter, . . 


57 76 


G. T. Fayerweather, 






Appraiser, . 


42 00 


Etta A. Graham, 






Assistant matron, 


21 14 


G. F. Heath, . 






Appraiser, . 


15 00 


J. Penniman & Son, 






Veterinary, 


15 00 


E E. Penfold, . 






Nurse, 


10 49 


Paul Varnum, . 






Mason, 


8 40 


J. J Donovan, . 






Farmer, 


8 00 


A. Guild, . 






Veterinary, 


7 50 


Curtis & Megquire, . 






Carpenters, 


7 15 


Capt Knox, 






Lecturer, . 


5 00 


Alex. E.Frye, . 






Special instructor, 


5 00 


Nurse, 






... 


2 50 


C. B. Frost & Co., . 






Plumbers, . 


2 00 








f546 94 



SUPERINTENDENTS. 



Date of 




Date of 






NAMES. 




Appointment. 




Retirement. 




1848, 


William R. Lincoln, ..... 


1853. 




3 85.°,. 


James M. Talcott, 






1857. 




1857, 


William E. Starr, 






1861. 




1861, 


Joseph A. Allen, . 






1867. 




1867, 


Oryille K Hutchinson, 






1868. 




1868, 


Benjamin Evans, . 






May, 1873. 


May, 


1873, 


Allen G. Shepherd, 






Aug., 1878. 


Aug., 


1878, 


Luther H Sheldon, 






Dec. 1880. 


Dec, 


1880, 


Edmund T. Dooley, 






Oct., 1881. 


Oct., 


1881, 


Joseph A. Allen, . 






April, 1885. 


July, 


1885, 


Henry E. Swan, . 






July, 1888. 


July, 


1888, 


Theodore F. Chapin, . 






Still in office. 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



87 



TRUSTEES. 



Names, Residences, Commissions and Retirement of the Trustees 
of the State Reform School, from the Commencement to the 
Present Time. 



Date of 






Date of 




NAMES. 


Kesidence 




Commission 






Retirement. 


1847, 


Nahum Fisher,* . 


Westborough, . 


1849 


1847, 


John W. Graves, 


Lowell, . 


1849 


1847, 


Samuel Williston, 


Easthampton, . 


1853 


1847, 


Thomas A. Green,* . 


New Bedford, . 


1860 


1847, 


Otis Adams,* 


Grafton, . 


1851 


1847, 


George Denney,* 


Westborough, . 


1851 


1847, 


William P. Andrews,* 


Boston, . 


1851 


1849, 


William Livingston,* 


Lowell, 


1851 


1849, 


Russell A. Gibbs,* 


Lanesborough, 


1853 


1851, 


George H. Kuhn, 


Boston, 


1855 


1851, 


J. B. French,* . 


Lowell, . 


1854 


1851, 


Daniel H. Forbes, 


Westborough, . 


1854 


1851, 


Edward B.Bigelow,* . 


Grafton, . 


1855 


1853, 


J, W. H. Page,* . 


New Bedford, . 


1856 


1853, 


Harvey Dodge, . 


Sutton, 


1867 


1854, 


G Howland Shaw,* . 


Boston, 


1856 


1854, 


Henry W. Cushman,* 


Bernardston, 


1860 


1855, 


Albert H. Nelson,* 


Woburn, . 


1855 


1855, 


Joseph A. Fitch, 


Hopkinton, 


1858 


1855, 


Parley Hammond, 


Worcester, 


1860 


1856, 


Simon Brown, . 


Concord, . 


1860 


1856, 


John A. Fayerweather, 


Westborough, . 


1859 


1857, •. 


Josiah H. Temple, 


Framingham, . 


1860 


1858, 


Judson S. Brown, 


Fitchburg, 


1860 


1859, 


Theodore Lyman, 


Brookline, 


1860 


1860, 


George C. Davis,* 


Northborough, 


1873 


1860, 


Carver Hotchkiss, 


Shelburne, 


1863 


1860, 


Julius A Palmer, 


Boston, 


1862 


1860, 


Henry Chick ering, 


Pittsfield, . 


1869 


1860, 


George W Bentley, . 


Worcester, 


1861 


1860, 


Alden Leland, 


Holliston, 


1864 


1861, 


Pliny Nickerson, 


Boston, 


1868 


1861, 


Samuel G. Howe,* 


Boston, 


1863 


1862, 


Benjamin Boynton,* . 


Westborough, . 


1864 


1863, 


J. H. Stephenson, 


Boston, 


1866 


1863, 


John Ayres, 


Charlestown, . 


1867 



* Deceased. 



88 PKIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct.'90. 



Names, Residences, etc., of Trustees — Concluded. 



Date of 






Date of 


Commission. 


NAMES. 


Residence. 


Retirement. 


1864, 


A. E. Goodnow, . 


Worcester, 


1874 


1864, 


Isaac Ames, 


Haverhill, 


1865 


1865, 


Jones S. Davis, . 


Holyoke, . 


1868 


1866, 


Joseph A. Pond,* 


Brighton, 


1867 


1867, 


Stephen G. Deblois, . 


Boston, . 


1878 


1868, 


John Ayres, 


Medford, . 


1874 


1868, 


Harmon Hall, 


Saugus, . 


1871 


1868, 


L L. Goodspeed, 


Bridgewater, . 


1872 


1869, 


E. A Hubbard, . 


Springfield, 


1877 


1871, 


Lucius W. Pond, 


Worcester, 


1875 


1871, 


John W. Olmstead, . 


Boston, 


1873 


1872, 


Moses H Sargent, 


Newton, . 


1877 


1873, 


A. S. Woodworth, 


Boston, 


1876 


1873, 


Edwin B. Harvey, 


Westborough, . 


1878 


1874, 


W. H. Baldwin, . 


Boston, 


1876 


1875, 


John L. Cummings, . 


Ashburnham, . 


1879 


1876, 


Jackson B. Swett, 


Haverhill, 


1878 


1877, 


Samuel R. Heywood, . 


Worcester, 


1879 


1877, 


Milo Hildreth, . 


Northborough,. 


1879 . 


1878, 


Lyman Belknap,* 


Westborough, . 


1879 


1878, 


Franklin Williams,* . 


Boston, 


1879 


1878, 


Robert Couch, 


Newburyport, . 


1879 


1879, 


John.T. Clark, . 


Boston, * . 


1879 


1879, 


M. J. Flatley, . 


Boston, 


1881 ' 


1879, 


Adelaide A. Calkins, . 


Springfield, 


1880 


1879, 


Lyman Belknap, 


Westborough, . 


1884 


1879, 


Anne B Richardson, . 


Lowell, . 


1886 


1879, 


Milo Hildreth, . 


Northborough,. 


Still in office. 


1879, 


George W. Johnson, . 


Brookfield, 


1887 


1879, 


Samuel R. Heywood, . 


Worcester, 


1888 


1880, 


Elizabeth C. Putnam, 


Boston, . 


Still in office 


1881, 


Thomas D wight, 


Boston, 


1884 


1884, 


M. H. Walker, . 


Westborough, . 


Still in office. 


1884, 


J. J. O'Connor,* 


Holyoke, . 




1886, 


Elizabeth G. Evans, . 


Boston, 




1887, 


Chas L. Gardner, 


Palmer, . 




1888, 


H. C. Greeley, . 


Clinton, . 




1889, 


M. J. Sullivan, . 


Chicopee, . 





* Deceased. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



State Industrial School for Girls, 



LANCASTER. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPORT. 



To the Honorable Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

I respectfully submit the report of the State Industrial 
School for the year ending Sept. 30, 1890. 

During the past year the average number in the school 
has been ninety-four, and, as we have only eighty rooms, the 
houses have been somewhat crowded. We are to have an 
addition of several rooms, together with other improvements, 
which will somewhat remedy this inconvenience. For it is 
impossible to do our best work when two or more girls 
occupy one room. The number in the school could not 
have been reduced unless we had placed girls out on proba- 
tion before they were well trained in household duties, or 
before they had sufficiently learned self-control to be trusted 
outside of the school. " The poorest education that teaches 
self-control is better than the best that neglects it ;" therefore, 
choosing between these two evils, we have chosen to keep 
them in the school. 

There can be no rule made as to the time the girls remain 
in the school. Each individual case must be decided, as no 
two girls are alike in disposition or in ability to learn. It is 
only by patience and perseverance that one can be taught to 
love what she once hated and to hate what she once loved. 
11 A higher morality, like a higher intelligence, must be 
reached by a slow growth." 

A large proportion of the girls who have been placed 
out have given good satisfaction; some of the most hope- 
ful have been very disappointing, but others less promising 
have done exceedingly well. Girls in place have saved and 
deposited in the bank one thousand ninety dollars, six cents, 
during the past year. Nearly all of these outside girls cor- 



92 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

respond more or less with the officers in the school, and 
often if they are ill return for treatment and rest as if it 
were their own home. 

It has been a serious question for years to know what 
to do for girls whose minds were too dull to be placed in 
families, and yet who could not be classed as idiots ; girls 
who are capable of earning an honest living if only they 
could be protected from those who are more vicious than 
themselves. There is now a home provided for such as these. 
The Waltham School for the Feeble-minded has in addition 
a custodial department, where they receive and care for this 
class of girls. They have hours for work, recreation and 
school ; are well cared for in every way. The superintendent 
and his officers appear to be much interested in this work 
of caring for the poor unfortunates. We expect soon to 
transfer two or more girls to this institution. 

Dr. O'Callaghan has been very faithful in her visits. It 
is seldom we call any other physician, never except in case 
of emergency. 

Thanking you for your faithful co-operation in the work, 
I am, 

Yours respectfully, 

L. L. BRACKETT, 

Superintendent. 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



\)6 



STATISTICS 



During the year there have been within the school for more or 

less time, 171 

In the school Sept. 30, 1889, . ... . . .87 

Returned to the school, having been placed out in 

former years, 28 

New commitments, 56 

Total in. school, . . . . . . . . — 171 

The following disposition was made of these girls : — 

In the school Sept. 30, 1890, 97 

In places, 5-1 

With friends, .......... 8 

Married, 1 

Almshouse, 2 

Other institutions, . . 2 

Reformatory prison,. . . . . . ' . . . 1 

Discharged, 2 

Died, .1 

Ran away from place, not recovered, 3 

Total, — 171 

There have been placed out during the year, . , . . . *86 
There have been returned (including the 28 of former years 1 

placing), 44 

For illness, 6 

change of place, 7 

unsatisfactory conduct, . . . . . .10 

theft, 2 

serious immorality, 9 

Returned from elopement, 7 

Transferred from prison, 1 

Transferred from other institutions, 2 

Total returned to the school, — 44 



* Of the 86 placed out, there have been placed once, .... 71 

" " twice, .... 10 

" " three times, ... 5 

Whole number of placings out, — 106 



94 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Total in custody Sept. 30, 1889, 2G1 

Committed this year, oft 

Total in custody during the year (including the 171 

already accomited for), ... — 317 



Of whom there have attained their majority, . 
Discharged by vote of trustees, 

Died, 

Total who have come of age, been discharged or 



At work in families, .... 
At work elsewhere, .... 
On probation with friends, 
Married in former years, not yet twenty- 
Married this year, not yet twenty-one, 
Total self-supporting, 



one, 



In school Sept. 30, 1890, . 
In other institutions, 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison in former year 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison this year, 
Total still supported by the State, 



Ran away from place in former years, not recovered, 
Ran away from place this year, not recovered, 



died, 



Total still in care of trustees, 



27 

13 

4 

— 44: 



89 
1 
29 
21 
18 
— 158 



97 
5 

9 



105 

10 
273 



Of those committed this year — 



47 could read and write. 
2 " " not write. 

7 " neither read nor write. 



5 were 13 years of age. 
12 " 14 " 
23 " 15 " 
16 " 16 " 



Orphans, 

One parent living, 



4 
23 



Both parents living, 



29 



45 born in Massachusetts. 
2 " Rhode Island. 
1 " Indiana. 



2 born in England. 
1 born in Belgium. 



16 American parentage. 

3 colored American parentage. 
21 Irish parentage. 

2 English " 

1 German " 



1 Scotch parentage. 
9 French " 
1 Swedish " 
1 Russian " 
1 Dutch 



1890.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 95 



Stubbornness, ... 33 

Larceny, . . . . 11 

Lewdness, .... 5 

Vagrancy, . . . . r 2 



Drunkenness, . 1 

Fornication, .... 2 

Night-walking, ... 1 

Idle and disorderly, . . 1 



Current expenses, $20,031 21 

Cash received and paid to the State treasury, 414 65 



$19,616 66 



Average number of inmates, 94.07. Dividing current ex- 
penses by average number of inmates gives annual 
cost of .... $221 95 

Weekly cost per capita, ... ... 4 08 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY. 



Real Estate. 



Chapel, $3,000 00 

House No. 1, . 8,250 00 

No. 2, 8,500 00 

No. 4, 9,000 00 

No. 5, 4,900 00 

Superintendent's house, 3,000 00 

Store-room, 300 00 

Farm-house and barn, 1,500 00 

Large barn, 7,000 00 

Silo, 400 00 

Storehouse, 450 00 

Old barn, . . . 150 00 

Wood-house, 125 00 

Ice-house, 100 00 

Storehouse No. 3, . . . . . . 25 00 

Piggery, 100 00 

Reservoir house No. 1, 100 00 

Reservoir house, land, etc., No. 2, . . . . 300 00 

Hen-house, 150 00 

Carriage shed, . . 150 00 

Farm, 176 acres, 7,500 00 

Wood lot, 10 acres, 200 00 

Storm windows, 48 00 

#55,248 00 



96 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Personal Property. 



Property in No. 1, . . 








11,164 39 


No. 2, . 








1,176 01 


No. 4, . 








1,490 50 


No. 5,' . 








819 77 


Superintendent's house, . 








980 00 


Chapel and library, . 








650 00 


Provisions and groceries, 








769 04 


Dry goods, 








779 97 


Crockery and hardware, . 








391 40 


Paint, . 








25 00 


Medicine, .... 








12 00 


Stationery, 








27 60 


Fuel, .... 








1,550 00 


Valuation of live stock, . 








1,899 00 


Valuation of horses, 








675 00 


Tools and carriages, 








. 1,800 00 


Produce of farm on hand , 








. 4,015 63 






|1« OOK 






A. J. BANCROFT, 


H. F. HOSxMER, 








Appraisers 



Commonwealth ©f Massachusetts. 
Worcester, ss. Oct. 8, 1890. 

Then personally appeared the above-named A. J. Bancroft and H. F. Hosraer, and 
made oath that the above appraisal by the subscribed is to the best of their knowl- 
edge and belief correct. 

Before me, 

CHAS. G. BANCROFT, 

Justice of the Peace. 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



97 



FARMER'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

In compliance with the request of the State auditor, I 
submit to you the farm account, together with the financial 
statement of the State Industrial School for Girls, for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1890. . 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. C. BRACKETT, 

Farmer and Steward. 



Summary of Farm Account. 

Dr. 

To live stock, as per inventory, .... $1,899 00 

To horses, as per inventory, 675 00 

To tools and carriages, 1,800 00 

Net gain during the year, 



To labor, . 
grain, . 

blacksmithing, 
grass, . 
phosphate, . 
nursery stock, 
pasturing, . 
lumber, 
hens, . 

rhubarb roots, 
cows, . 

sawing lumber, 
repairs, 
grindstone, 
ice, 
oxen, ... 



Dr. 





$4,374 00 




279 00 


$1,330 98 




. 1,055 17 




63 78 




20 00 




34 65 




38 00 




41 00 




36 41 




35 35 




20 05 




186 00 




26 33 




11 13 




6 00 




55 00 




158 00 





98 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



To manure, .... 
hay caps, .... 
horse rake, .... 

salt, 

repairs of mowing machine, 
hardware, .... 
baskets, .... 



$146 00 

17 50 

33 00 

7 20 

6 80 

5 60 

10 13 



$,3,344 08 



Or. 

By farm products of 1890, as per inventory, 

By farm products of 1889, as per inventory, 

Net gain during the year, 



Milk, 46,726 quarts, . 

Pork, 6,775 pounds, . 

Beef, 6,503 pounds, . 

Bedding, 25 tons, 302 pounds, 

Second crop, 3 tons, 940 pound 

Turnips, 50 bushels, 

Eggs, 651 dozen, 

Lumber, 7,000 feet, . 

Wood, 36 cords, 

Asparagus, 

Rhubarb, . 

Strawberries, 121 quarts, 

Blackberries, . 

Beet greens, 50 bushels, 

Lettuce, . 

Barley, 8 bushels, . 

Sweet corn, 194 bushels, 

Cucumbers, 

Tomatoes 

Potatoes, 50 bushels, 

Apples, 146 bushels, 

Cabbage, 65 heads, . 

Pease, 26 bushels, . 

Beans, 21 bushels, . 

Radishes, . 

Squash, 600 pounds, 

Beets, 10 bushels, . 

Corn fodder, 12 tons, 

Ice, .... 

Keeping horse for use of school 

Calves, 

Produce sold 



40| bushels, 
23| bushels, 



Net gain during year, 



$4,015 63 
3,031 11 



. $1,401 84 


412 50 


455 21 


150 89 


41 64 


12 00 


161 35 


140 00 


180 00 


12 00 


15 00 


18 15 


9 60 


12 50 


10 00 


8 00 


97 00 


40 50 


11 75 


50 00 


130 00 


6 50 


32 50 


21 00 


5 00 


9 00 


7 50 


72 00 


300 00 


150 00 


74 00 


161 69 





$984 52 



$4,209 12 
984 52 



$5,193 64 



1*90.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



99 



Produce sold and Receipts sent to State Treasurer. 



Calves, .... 


$241 85 


Service of animal, 


$2 00 


Cow, . . 


7 50 


Board, . 


98 00 


Milk, . 


8 24 


Coal, . 


31 34 


Pigs, .... 


23 50 








Discount on Houghton 






$414 65 


& Dutton's bill, . 


2 21 






Produce consumed Sept. 30, 1890. 




Milk, 46,726 quarts, 


$1,401 84 


Barley, 8 bushels,. 


$8 00 


Pork, 6,775 pounds, 


412 50 


Sweet corn, 194 bushels 


97 00 


Beef, 6,503 pounds, 


455 21 


Cucumbers, 401 bushel* 


3, 40 50 


Bedding, 25 tons, 302 




Tomatoes, 23| bushels 


11 75 


pounds, 


150 89 


Potatoes, 50 bushels, 


50 00 


Second crop, 3 tons, 940 




Apples, 146 bushels, 


130 00 


pounds, 


41 64 


Cabbage, 65 heads, 


6 50 


Turnips, 


12 00 


Pease, 26 bushels, . 


32 50 


Eggs, 651 dozen, . 


161 35 


Beans, 21 bushels, 


21 00 


Lumber, 7,000 feet, 


140 00 


Radishes, 75 bunches, 


5 00 


Wood, 36 cords, . 


180 00 


Squash, 600 pounds, 


9 00 


Asparagus, . 


12 00 


Beets, 10 bushels, . 


7 50 


Rhubarb, . . 


15 00 


Corn fodder, 12 tons, 


72 00 


Strawberries, 121 quarts, 


18 15 


Ice, 


300 00 


Blackberries, 

Beet greens, 50 bushels, 


9 60 
12 50 








$3,823 43 


Lettuce, . 


10 00 






Produce on H^ 


,nd Oct. 1, 1890. 




Apples, winter, 61 bar- 




Lumber, hard, 5,000 feet, $75 00 


rels, .... 


$125 00 


Lumber, lot mixed, 


21 45 


Apples, cider, 50 bar- 




Mangolds, 46 tons, 


460 00 


rels, . 


20 00 


Manure, cords, 50, 


300 00 


Beans, white, 27 bushels, 


67 50 


Onions, 15 bushels, 


15 00 


Beets, table, 170 bushels, 


85 50 


Pork, salt, 600 pounds, 


48 00 


Barley, fodder, 4| tons, 


30 00 


Pumpkins, 7,510 pounds 


50 00 


Cabbage, heads, 1,127, . 


90 16 


Pickles, salted, 4 barrels 


16 00 


Carrots, bushels, 35, 


17 50 


Parsnips, 50 bushels, 


25 00 


Celery, heads, 300, 


15 00 


Potatoes, 385 bushels, 


150 00 


Corn, pop, 800 pounds, 


24 00 


Rowen, 16,235 pounds, 


81 17 


" sweet, 80 bushels, 


55 50 


Ruta-bagas,200 bushels 


67 50 


" fodder, 


22 00 


Squash, 3,280 pounds, 


80 00 


" sweet, seed, 17 




Tomatoes, green, 4C 




bushels, 


25 00 


bushels, 


20 00 


Ensilage, 100 tons, 


500 00 


Vinegar, 780 gallons. 


156 00 


Hay, 61 tons, 


915 00 


Vinegar, stock, 100 gal- 




" old, 25 tons, . 


400 00 


lons, . 


10 00 


" meadow, 4 tons, . 
Hungarian, 3,270 pounds, 


32 00 
16 35 








$4,01563 



100 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



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1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



101 






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102 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 






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October, . 
November, 
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January, 

February, 

March, 

April, 

May,. 

June, 

July, . 

August, 

Septembei 



1890.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 



103 



Pay-roll of Persons employed at the State Industrial School for the 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1890. 



Nature of Service. 



L. L. Brackett, 
N. C. Brackett, 
C. J. Bean, . 
R. M. Rice, . 
S. E. Stowe, . 
H. T. Spalding, 
M. F. Jennings, 
G. R. Greene, 
M. R. Eames, 
L. D. May hew, 
A. A. Smith, . 
A. J. Wheeler, 
H. A. Woodward, 
L. B. Barton, 
E. B. Eames, 
H. A. Woodward, 
A. L. Brackett, 
L. B. Barton, . 
A. M. Fellows, 
E. B. Eames, . 
M. K. Verrill, 
C. M. Nickerson, 
L. G. Woodward, 
C. A. Rand, . 
A. L. Greene, 
M. R. Eames, 
C. E. Cobleigh, 
A. E. Smith, . 
M. Torry, 
K. E. Saunders, 
M. J. Mclntire, 
I. E. Smart, . 
C. A. Rand, . 
L. G. Woodward, 
I. E. Brown, . 
A. A. Smith, . 
R. M. Chabot, 
N. C. Harrington, 
Mrs. Crafts, . 
E. B. Eamea, 
M.V.O'Callaghan 

C. B.Hamlin, 
W. F. Greene, 
J. 0. Rice, . 
N. 0. Mclntire, 
A. E. Brown, . 
James Brodrick, 
J. W. Chandler, 

0. G. Mclntire, - 
R. C. Knight, 

H. K. Pervear, 

D. B. Scott, . 
J. C. Duncan, 
T. H. Fisher, . 

1. G. Ward, . 



Superintendent, . 
Farmer and steward, 
Matron, 



Sub. matron, 



Vacancy officer, 

Sub. 

Teacher, 



Sub. teacher, 



Housekeeper, 



Sub. housekeeper, 



Physician, 

Foreman, 

(< 

Laborer, 



Clergyman, 



1 year, 

1 " 

10 months 
6 
17 days, 

3 months 
2 

7 

2 ■ «« 

4 " 
1 

1 

7 

1 

1 

4 

7 

9 
10 

7 
10 

2 

2 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

10 
11 
10 

3 

8 

5 

3 

2 

3 

1 



1 month, 
] year, 
1 month, 
8 



24 days, 
24 " 

22 days, 
14 " 
9 " 



25 days, 
7 " 

24 " 

21 " 
24 " 

1 " 

18 " 
10 " 

26 " 
12 " 

15 days, 

22 " 

2 " 

4 days, 

19 " 
9 " 

14 » 

12 " 

14 « 
24 " 

15 " 



25 days, 

21 " 

20 " 

9 « 

27 days, 

4 " 

24 " 

13 " 

5£ days. 



Com- 
pensation. 



$999 96 
650 04 
313 65 
197 96 

16 25 
108 51 

71 33 
212 74 

58 32 
116 64 

29 16 

53 59 
210 81 

52 13 

49 29 
119 68 

175 94 
240 23 

258 22 
196 35 

259 49 

50 00 
63 12 
43 06 
26 64 
75 00 
28 28 
40 60 

257 40 
286 50 
259 85 

86 49 
219 72 
137 33 

75 00 
50 00 
95 55 
42 26 
16 44 
32 40 

200 04 

81 94 

365 92 

176 80 
238 76 

78 00 

87 50 
114 00 

76 00 
25 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

$7,772 89 



104 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct.'90. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Lancaster Industrial School. 

I have the honor of submitting my sixth annual report for 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1890. 

During the epidemic of "La Grippe" we had over fifty 
cases among our girls, but all made perfect recoveries. 

One girl came from a home where diphtheria was prevail- 
ing. She suffered from diphtheritic sore throat for a week, 
but the disease was happily limited to this one person. 

We have had four cases of specific trouble ; three are 
better, while one is now under treatment. 

Three girls have been returned to the school in pregnant 
condition. Of these, it is but fair to add that one was not 
responsible, because of weak-mindedness. She was from the 
beginning a better subject for the School for Feeble-minded 
than for an industrial institution. Now that a custodial 
department has been added to the school at Waltham, it is 
to be hoped that girls of that stamp, viz., girls physically 
strong, but weak mentally and morally, may be sent where 
they can be protected from danger, — not only during the 
years of their minority, but throughout the whole child- 
bearing period. 

At present we have one girl at House No. 5 in a precarious 
condition from repeated hemorrhages, and at House No. 4 
there are a few cases of light tonsillar sore throat. With 
these exceptions the health of our school is excellent. 

Respectfully, 

MARY V. O'CALLAGHAN, M.D. 

Worcester, October, 1890. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT. No. 18. 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



State Primary and Reform Schools, 



WITH THE 



ANNUAL EEPOETS OF THE RESIDENT OFFICERS, 



For the Year ending Sept. 30, 1891. 



BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1892. 



ON. 

nov . m 



feimonforalifr of Pamrfprntte* 



TRUSTEES' REPORT, 



STATE PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. 

To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools 
respectfully present their Thirteenth Annual Report of the 
three institutions committed to their care. 

State Primary School at Monson. 

The State's wards who live at the Primary School at 
Monson are neglected and dependent children who have 
been committed to the care of the State Board of Lunacy 
and Charity, together with some convicted of light offences. 
There are also a few women who have been transferred with 
their children from the State almshouse. 

On Sept. 30, 1891, there are in the school 259 boys, 58 
girls and 12 women, making in all 329. There have been 
boarded out from the school during the year 69 children, 
of whom 14 were first placed at board during this year. 
The weekly per capita cost of children in the school has 
been $3.02, and of those at board $1.87. The largest num- 
ber of inmates who were at any one time in the school was 
370, while the smallest number was 292. The total num- 
ber who at one time or another during the year have been 
sheltered by the institution has been 637. It is worthy 
of remark that the average number for the year has been 
30 less than last year's average. This is due to the special 
effort which was made early in the winter to place out the 



4 PEIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

younger children in as large numbers as was possible. This 
was done when it became necessary to renovate the nursery. 

The year just ended has been marked by several improve- 
ments which had become necessary to the healthfullness of 
the school, and for which $2,000 was appropriated by the 
Legislature and approved May 3, 1891. A careful inspec- 
tion of the plumbing of the buildings was made by a sani- 
tary engineer employed by the trustees, and many changes 
were made in accordance with his recommendations. A 
water-tight Akron drain has been substituted for the old 
sewer, which was built of loosely laid stone. The old drain 
allowed the escape of its contents into the surrounding soil 
close to the buildings, — a state of things which could not 
but threaten the health of the inmates. The sewage is now 
conducted down a slope to a safe distance from the buildings, 
and there it is allowed to escape into the soil. We are con- 
sidering the advisability of introducing a system of subsoil 
distribution for its final disposal. 

In the water supply of the school important improvements 
have been made. In the superintendent's report of last year 
attention was called to the foul condition of the main reser- 
voir, which made the water from that source useless for most 
purposes at certain seasons of the year. In order to insure 
a wise expenditure of the appropriation made to remedy this 
evil, a very careful study of the water supply of the school 
was made by an engineer, under the direction of the firm 
of Percy M. Blake of Hyde Park ; and in accordance with 
his suggestions both reservoirs have been drained and 
thoroughly cleaned out, and considerable grading has been 
done for the purpose of preventing surface waters and the 
drainage from a neighboring; farm from flowing in. A core 
wall has been laid in the embankment on the west side of the 
south reservoir, to prevent leakage. For lack of funds, some 
further recommendations of the engineer were not carried out. 
The water from the reservoirs now proves of good quality. 
Some further necessary repairs are now being made in the 
ice-pond. 

The third notable improvement in the hygienic condition of 
the school has been the renovation of the nursery. In our 
last report the necessity for some vigorous action in this 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 5 

quarter was set forth in detail in the report of the State 
Board of Health. These suggestions were carefully carried 
out. A quarantine is now enforced in the cases of the 
younger new arrivals, and in many ways additional safe- 
guards have been thrown about the children to protect their 
health. Although many improvements still remain to be 
made, we regard this hygienic work of the year with some 
satisfaction. Long steps have been taken toward making the 
school such a healthful home as it is our duty to provide 
for the children. 

The class work in the school, under the skilful manage- 
ment of sympathetic teachers, leaves little to criticise. The 
teachers have the happy faculty of inspiring even the dull 
little ones with a good degree of interest. The Sloycl 
system has lately been introduced in the manual training 
department. This carefully considered series of progressive 
exercises in the use of tools seems the best means yet devised 
of awakening in an unhandy boy his latent mechanical 
instinct. 

But we cannot close our eyes to the fact that our whole 
duty to the children is not discharged even if we should pro- 
vide the most healthful house and the best teachers for them. 
They have now a good school, and probably much more 
comfortable and healthful quarters than they have known in 
their former lives. Yet one has but to look at the children 
and talk with them as they are solemnly gathered for their 
meals, to see that something is left out of their lives, — and 
a decidedly important something, too. Making all due allow- 
ance for the kind of children whom one must expect to 
meet in such a school, there is a dreariness in their aspect 
when congregated in the dining-hall that there should not be, 
and which is depressing to the spectator. One of the little 
boys, who had earnestly asked, as many of them do, to be 
taken away, was asked why he wanted to go, — whether he 
had any complaint to make. He thought a long time and 
very seriously, and finally answered, simply, " 1 want to go 
home ;" and his was not a case of temporary homesickness. 
In our opinion, he expressed the lack that all feel at the 
school, and that many others vaguely try to formulate. In 
a word, the school provides the children a good "Home 



6 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

(spelled with a big II)," but what they want and need is a 
"home (with a small h)." The institutional air, in dis- 
tinction from the home or family air, is everywhere too 
apparent, except perhaps in the school work, or wherever 
the children are separated into small working forces. The 
child sleeps as one of three hundred ; washes, dresses, 
eats, is marched across the yard into the high-fenced, bare 
playground, — all as if he were a member of a huge chain 
gang. 

But whatever special causes we may assign as contribut- 
ing chiefly to this institutional influence, the fact demanding 
our attention remains, that life in line in an institution is not 
a natural life for a child to lead. The children feel it and 
the spectator feels it ; and who shall say that we can fully 
appreciate the harm done a child in thus repressing the 
natural development of his individuality. In dealing with 
such large numbers of children all under one roof, the 
methods employed by the managers and supervisors may be 
the only ones practicable. The children when all are together 
must be marched here and there, be silent at meals, and so 
on, or the confusion would be hopeless. The pity of it is 
that it is necessary to keep them all together in the present 
great buildings which the school has inherited from the old 
almshouse. 

Recognizing, then, the need of a home influence for these 
children, how is it possible to supply this need ? Very much 
has been done by the boarding-out system toward supplying 
real homes, and in keeping down the number of those who 
are necessarily kept at the institution ; but we are confident 
that very much more can and should be done in the same 
direction. The average cost to the State of a child at board 
is less than at the school ; and in the long run boarding out 
proves even a greater economy, because of the earlier age at 
which he becomes self-supporting. But the great advantage 
to the child of growing up in a good family is not to be esti- 
mated by dollars and cents. There will always be a certain 
number of feeble-minded and physically incapable children, 
for whom the Primary School will prove a necessity ; and to 
these must be added not a very large number of juvenile 
offenders who are too young to be intentionally vicious. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 7 

Such mischievous boys must be kept for a while under care- 
ful supervision, before they can be safely trusted out. In 
caring for these the Primary School will always find enough 
to do, and it is the hope of the trustees that in the near future 
these two classes of children will be the only ones to be found 
there. In some other communities, simply neglected and 
dependent children are placed out as soon as found, without 
being sent to an institution at al). At most, this school 
should shelter them only so long as is necessary to find out 
their special needs and capabilities, and to make them pre- 
sentable preliminary to placing them out. The trustees are 
formulating a plan, for which we may ask an appropriation, 
for materially extending the boarding-out system. 

But there can be no doubt that much could be done, and 
we trust w T ill be done before long, to rob this school of its 
distinctly institutional air. If from year to year, under the 
guidance of a general plan drawn up at the outset, steps 
could be taken toward replacing the great barn-like build- 
ings by small, comfortable, home-like houses, a great advance 
might be made at no very great annual expense, It is a 
change that we think would be justified, even at the cost of 
sacrificing the present plant. There is no reason why the 
family system, which proves such an influence for good in 
the other State schools, should not prove equally beneficial 
to the Primary children. But we consider it of first impor- 
tance to reduce the numbers at the Primary School by extend- 
ing the boarding-out system. 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 

WESTBOROUGH. 



The employments provided for the boys may be classified 
as follows : — 

1. The necessary work about the houses, garden and 
farm. 

2. The occupations generally called " industries." 

3. Educational work in the school-room and the workshop. 
1. Under the direction and with the assistance of the 

house officers, farmer and assistant farmer, in their several 
departments, the boys have carried on the farm, garden and 
house work, the last including the cooking, laundry work 
and repairing of ordinary clothing, the waxing and dry- 
polishing of floors. They have also painted some of the 
houses outside and inside, besides accomplishing other useful 
job-work about the place. In order that as many as possible 
might take part in the culture of vegetables and so learn 
how much labor is required for their production, a separate 
kitchen garden was assigned to each house. With the help 
of the ox-team the boys have carted stones and laid the sub- 
soil drainage of the new cellar and roadways. 
. 2. The " industries," i.e., heel-cutting, blacksmith work, 
type-setting, printing and tailoring, have to a great extent 
taken the place of chair-seating which is nevertheless found 
useful as an occupation for unskilled hands which must be 
kept out of mischief. While these industries are to a very 
small extent remunerative and have but little educational 
value as compared with other training which will later be 
described, they demand that steady application to work which 
is an essential feature of reformatory discipline, and can be 
made economical in saving unnecessary outlay. Since some 
degree of skill is indispensable in order to secure any of 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 9 

these benefits, a boy is generally detailed to work from three 
to six consecutive months, at the special industry that is car- 
ried on in the household to which he is assigned, this kind of 
work being limited to three or four hours per day on four 
or five days per week and never being allowed to interfere 
with his afternoon school nor with his hour and a half per 
week in the morning woodwork class.* 

3. While the school lessons, including the systematic 
manual training of various kinds, stand third upon the list, 
they are by no means least in importance in their influence 
upon the boys. 

Professor Koyce of Harvard College has furnished an 
interesting analysis of the essential elements of education 
which closes with the following summary : — 

" One may confidently say that what is needed in training 
the mind is the formation of habits of action that are : (1) 
Interesting to the pupil; (2) Inspired by a purpose, espe- 
cially by a purpose to imitate, literally (as drawing does) or 
symbolically (as language does), the structure and the proc- 
esses of real things; (3) Complex, so that a great deal of 
manifold functioning is involved in what is done ; (4) Well- 
knit, definite, rationally connected, so that these activities 
shall not be flighty and spasmodic. By degrees, passing 
from simpler to more complex processes, a good teacher will 
train a mind through such activities." 

In order to fulfil these conditions it is obvious that the 
training should be carefully adjusted to the needs of the 
boys with whom the school has to deal. It is generally 
recognized in these days that whereas the mathematician 
can work out abstract problems and the literary man find 
complete satisfaction in his books, the dull boy or even the 
average boy needs first to handle the raw material, to work 
upon it and to gain a mastery over it and so learn that 
many of the facts concerning the laws of nature, which he 
finds recorded in books, are facts within his own cognizance. 
It has been truly said of pupils who are weak on the lit- 
erary side that, "encouraged by their success in the manual 

* During the six weeks when the schools are not in session, the farm and garden 
work and necessary housework usually occupy eight hours per day ; for the rest of 
the year the school lessons occupy the afternoon from 2 to 5, and the evening from 
6 to 7.30. 



10 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



branches, they gradually gain a better control of tongue 
and pen." Such is the experience of "The Workingman's 
School" in New York City, and that of the Lyman School 
points in the same direction. A large proportion of the 
boys committed to this school had evidently started in life 
with sluggish or abnormal mental powers as well as with 
unfavorable surroundings. As a natural result the boy falls 
behind his class, plays truant and after " bunking out" 
with other truants is tempted to steal a breakfast from the 
nearest fruit stall. Perhaps his next venture is to steal 
goods that can be bartered for tobacco, liquor, or theatre 
tickets, till he is caught and sent away. Such a boy, if 
smart enough, may keep the rules of the institution fairly 
well, with a view to an early release and a return to his 
unfinished career of lawlessness. If the reform school fail 
to awaken an interest in some better mode of life it can 
do him little service ; but if his restless ingenuity can be 
engaged in legitimate work, he may be set to devising legit- 
imate ways to achieve success such as his fascinating news- 
paper heroes have achieved by crooked ways, and t;here is 
some hope for a true reformation. If, for instance, instead 
of being punished for whittling his desk he can be taught to 
apply a jacknife and then other tools to make out of a rough 
board a well-formed and complete article, one motive for 
misconduct is removed ; he is set to work upon what he 
thoroughly enjoys, and, to his surprise, he no longer feels 
himself an outlaw. The " Educational Sloyd," which has 
for two years been employed in the school, differs from the 
instruction that can be obtained in an ordinary carpenter's 
shop in providing a systematic series of lessons which require 
of the pupil practical exercises in multiplication, division 
and fractions. He must discover for himself how many 
inches make a foot and how many sixteenths there are in 
an inch ; by a carefully planned progression which he is 
able to comprehend, he is taught a new process with each 
new tool. Any imperfection in measurement or in execution 
brings its own penalty in results which he can see and which 
he cannot evade, and, according to his faithfulness, or his 
heedlessness, the completed work, whether a simple wedge 
or a dove-tail joint, becomes a source of satisfaction or of 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 11 

regret. He is now prepared to apply his skill to common 
carpentering, cabinet-making or other trades. 

At each step the work of the school- room is related to that 
of the manual training. Preliminary work in clay modelling 
and drawing prepares the pupil to understand the principles 
familiarly recognized in the workshop. Besides learning 
what any country-bred boy would be ashamed not to know 
about the grain of the wood and other practical matters, his 
eye is trained to a nicer perception and his hand to a nicer 
skill. His observation lessons now become interesting as he 
studies the bean-plant in embryo and at various stages of 
growth, sketching it as well as he can, and describing it in 
his written exercise. The habit of thus recording what he 
has himself observed prepares him to reproduce what he 
.gathers from reading upon any subject in which he is 
interested. The importance to this class of boys of forming 
a taste for good reading can hardly be overstated. Biograph- 
ical sketches compiled from various sources and read at the 
close of the summer term, showed that many of the Lyman 
School boys had been reading and studying intelligently and 
with a purpose. 

Aside from the system of education described above, which 
is adapted from various methods such as are open to public- 
school boys in Philadelphia, Springfield, Boston and other 
cities, there has been no effort made to provide special enter- 
tainments, for it is not the purpose of those in charge to 
offer the boys any inducement to remain dependent upon the 
charity of the State any longer than is necessary for the 
building up of correct habits. Base-ball and foot-ball are 
played with zeal. Military drill has been continued, under 
the instruction of one of the officers, and gymnastic exer- 
cises have been added, both at the charge of the Lyman 
Fund. While none of these improvements prevent occa- 
sional attempts, especially on the part of newly committed 
boys, to run away, there has been among the generality of 
the boys less restlessness, a marked improvement in energy 
in marching, a more erect carriage of the body, while in 
some instances special talent for the mechanical work has 
developed. When the woodwork classes were first started* 
a boy would occasionally try to palm off another boy's better 



12 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

work for his own ; but, as one after another began to under- 
stand the intention of the lessons and to find himself capable 
of completing each model in its order, this pilfering ceased. 

The average time for remaining in the institution has been 
twenty-one months. The superintendent explains that of 
the boys placed out this year, thirty-eight had spent some- 
what more than two years in the school. This increased the 
average of months spent in the school by those released this 
year by a little more than four months. No boy has been 
kept in the school after there seemed a reasonable probability 
that on release he would do well. One hundred and six have 
been placed out with friends or at work, of whom only four 
have been returned for unsatisfactory conduct and one dis- 
abled by an accident, a few others for change of place. 

Applications for the return of a boy to his relatives are 
first referred for investigation to the officers of the State 
Board and later carefully considered by the trustees of the 
school at their regular meetings. Boys placed on probation 
either in their own homes or elsewhere are visited by a special 
agent of the State Board with excellent results, a larger pro- 
portion than formerly being induced to keep steadily at work, 
and the runaways being more promptly returned or relocated. 

A careful study of the school records enables the superin- 
tendent to furnish the following statement concerning 356 
boys visited by the agent of the State Board, and 139 who 
have been dropped from visitation : ■ — 

Conduct reported good, 274 

Conduct reported fair, . . . . . . . .56 

Conduct reported bad, . .26 

Total reported by State agent, 356 

Enlisted in army or navy, 10 

Transferred to State Primary School, 3 

Transferred to Superintendent In-door Poor, 3 

Discharged as unfit subjects, 4 

Runaways from the school, 8 

All trace lost of, 36 

Sentenced after having been placed out, 44 

Transferred by vote of trustees to the Massachusetts Reformatory, 20 

Transferred by vote of trustees to other institutions, ... 11 

Total, 495 

Remaining in Lyman School, 200 

695 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 13 

Of the boys committed to the Lyman School since July 1, 
1887, 11 have been transferred by vote of trustees and 9 
sentenced by courts. 

The trustees are glad to report that the new buildings, for 
which an appropriation of $16,000 was granted in May, 1890, 
has, under the oversight of the superintendent and Mr. Clark, 
been completed without a deficit and proves satisfactory in 
every respect. The trustees are considering the advisability 
of introducing a system of electric lighting as well as some 
changes in the sewerage, and may ask for appropriations for 
these improvements and for a bakery. 

The appropriation for salaries and current expenses was 
$44,700. The total expenditure from Sept. 30, 1890, to 
Sept. 30, 1891, has been $42,476.88. The gross per capita 
cost, making no allowance for cash paid into the State treas- 
ury, which amounted to $1,275.45, was $4.44; net cost, 
$4.31. 

The treasurer's account of the Lyman Fund and Mary 
Lamb Fund will show the value of these endowments in 
enabling the trustees to carry out the good intentions of the 
donors for the benefit of the boys. 



14 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 

LANCASTER. 



In the administration of the Industrial School, the trus- 
tees believe the following points to be of especial value : — 

1. The girls are cared for in separate cottages, the re- 
spective inmates being graded according to the nature of their 
characters and experiences before coming to the school. 
Reports which the officers of the courts bring with the girl 
at her commitment afford the basis for such discrimination, 
the superintendent supplementing this by her own estimate 
of the case. There is no promotion from house to house; 
i.e., good conduct within the institution never allows one 
who has been guilty of serious offences to be transferred to 
a family containing more innocent girls ; but for bad conduct 
in the school or when out on probation a girl may be trans- 
ferred to the household containing similar offenders. This 
method of grading reduces to a minimum the danger of 
contaminating the comparatively innocent ; for no intercourse 
is allowed between girls of the various houses, each family 
being kept to itself both when at work or school or play. 
Except when the institution is crowded, each girl has a 
separate sleeping-room. 

2. The occupations of the girls are not such as to bring in a 
revenue. The whole emphasis of the school is turned toward 
fitting them as quickly as possible for life in the world ; and 
the life for which it seems best to train them is that of service 
in country households, or in their own homes. Accordingly, 
every girl who leaves the school is skilled not only in one 
but in all the domestic departments, — sewing, cleaning, 
laundry work and cooking. To accomplish this, as soon as 
she is proficient in one branch she is promoted to another 
department in the same house ; this would be impossible 
were the institution relying on her skill to earn an income. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 15 

That this varied training fulfils its purpose is amply attested 
by the demand, far beyond the supply, for girls trained at 
Lancaster. 

3. The appointments of the houses are rigidly simple. 
No heat is allowed in the sleeping-rooms ; furnaces cared for 
by the girls are used in preference to steam heat ; and there 
are no set wash-tubs or other labor-saving contrivances, — 
for the girls must learn to contend with such lack of modern 
conveniences as they will surely encounter in the plain house- 
holds where their work will be in demand. The matrons are 
encouraged to practise, and to teach the the girls to practise, 
the small economies of an old-fashioned farm-house, — 
repairing and dyeing old carpets, upholstering shabby furni- 
ture, papering, painting, setting window panes, and often 
performing the simpler kinds of carpentering. They delight 
in such novel occupations, which give variety and zest to a 
round of tasks that might otherwise grow monotonous. The 
practice is to reward good work by promotion to some more 
skilled employment ; and the success of this method in incit- 
ing girls, previously w T ayward, idle and ignorant, to self- 
respect and a workmanlike ambition to excel, is remarkable. 
"lam doing the officers' wash," or " Next week I shall be 
in the kitchen," is the usual form in which they appeal for 
approbation ; and to be degraded to some less responsible 
department is felt by all as a heavy disgrace. This honor 
for work is maintained by example as well as by precept, 
the superintendent and steward, and no less than the subordi- 
nate officers, sharing with the girls in the most menial 
services. Work is valued, not for its kind, but for its 
quality ; the officers who teach the housework receive the 
same pay, and are as intelligent and refined, as those who 
preside in the school-room. One of them, versed in music? 
French and other accomplishments, who had filled several 
offices in the school, when asked how she managed to do 
everything so perfectly, answered, " That is the only way to 
raise drudgery into an art." 

Out-door work upon the farm also proves an invaluable 
feature of the school. For three months during the summer 
the steward carried on the farm without any foreman ; but 
the girls, under the supervision of a young lady engaged for 



16 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

the purpose, did such valiant service, cutting and husking 
corn, filling the silo, etc., that no extra workman was hired. 
Those who question whether this is " woman's work" would 
have their minds at rest could they see the joyous interest of 
the workers, or note the blooming health of even those who 
came to the school frail and sickly. Hysterics and fits of 
screaming and of noisy disobedience, which used to be occa- 
sional episodes of institution life, have of late years become un- 
known ; and the physician and superintendent attribute much 
of this improvement to the way the girls work off their bad 
spirits as well as their high spirits in a vigorous out-door life. 

4. A long probation under supervision is the correlative 
of a short period of detention in the institution. While the 
girls are all sentenced for minority, a year or fifteen months 
in the school is generally enough to teach them how to work 
and how to control themselves ; but to lead them to choose 
right living in the face of temptation is necessarily a much 
longer task. Accordingly they are released, not to absolute 
freedom, but to carefully selected homes, where during their 
whole minority they are subject to a certain amount of super- 
vision and to recall for bad conduct. The system of volun- 
teer local visitors, organized under the State Board of 
Lunacy and Charity, provides a kind of oversight and 
influence which would otherwise be impossible. Of course, 
during this long period, lasting sometimes for six or seven 
years, many who were believed, and believed themselves, to 
be reformed, fall back to evil ways ; while others, of whom 
it seemed impossible to expect anything, do well. Of the 
123 out on probation, 21 have this year run away or been 
returned for serious fault. The others, besides maintaining 
themselves honestly, have among them put in the savings 
bank $1,179.80. 

The following table explains the present status of the 319 
girls in custody of the school during the year just closed : — 

During the year there have been in the school for more or less 

time, 179 

In the school Sept. 30, 1890, 97 

Returned to the school, having been placed out in 

former years, . " . 36 

New commitments, 46 

Total, — 179 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



17 



The following disposition was made of these girls : — 

91 
56 
12 

2 



In the school Sept. 30, 1891, 
In places, .... 
With friends, . 
Married 



Home for Feeble-minded, 

Reformatory Prison, . 

Discharged, .... 

Died, . . . 

Ran away from place, not recovered, 

At work elsewhere, . 

Temporary home, 

Of age, 

Total, .... 



There have been placed out during the year, 
There have been returned, 
For serious immorality, 
unsatisfactory conduct, 
change of place, 
illness, 
larceny, 
homesickness, 
rest, 

drunkenness, 
Returned from elopement, 
Returned from hospital, . 
Total returned to the school, 

Total in custody, Sept. 30, 1890, 
Committed this year, 

Total in custody during the year, 

Of whom there have attained their majority, 

Discharged by vote of trustees, 

Died, 

Total who have come of age, been discharged or died, 



Temporary home, 

At work in families, 

At work elsewhere, 

On probation with friends, 
Married in former years, not yet twenty-one, 
Married this year, not yet twenty-one', . 
Total self-supporting, 



16 
14 
11 

7 
1 
2 



273 
46 



28 

13 

4 



179 

119 

66 



66 



319 



45 



1 

96 
1 
26 
23 
13 
— 160 



* Of the 119 placed out, there have been placed once, . 
" " twice, . 
" " three times, 
Whole number of placings out, 



102 
16 
1 
— 137 



18 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



91 
l 
3 

5 



100 



4 
10 



In the school Sept. 30, 1891, . 

In other institutions, 

Transferred to Reformatory Prison in former years, 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison this year, 
Total still supported by the Slate, . 

Ran away from place in former years, not recovered, 
Rau away from place this year, not recovered, 

14 

Total still in care of trustees, . . . . . . .319 

Of the 46 commitments this year, 26 were for " stubborn- 
ness " on complaint of parents, who feared that disobedience 
was leading or had led to graver sins ; and 20 were brought 
before the courts by the police, too often as notorious 
offenders. It cannot be too strongly urged that the former 
class should be increased at the expense of the latter; i. e., 
that parents, friends and officers of the law should more 
frequently interpose to check wayward girls in the first stages 
of a downward career. It often happens that, when first 
brought before the courts, they are put on probation ; but, 
being subject to no effective oversight or other influence 
likely to induce a change of heart, too often their reprieve 
only allows them to stain themselves deeper with sins that 
can never be wholly washed away. While the trustees are 
pursuaded that the age limit of seventeen is none too high, — 
those of sixteen and over often proving as amenable to reform- 
ing influences as the younger ones, — as a general thing it is 
a bitter misfortune for the girl that the work has been post- 
poned so late. 

The appropriation was $21,000, — $13,000 for current 
expenses and $8,000 for salaries. The net per capita cost 
was $4.37. The same appropriation will probably be needed 
for the coming year. Also a special appropriation must be 
asked, to repair, or possibly to replace, the chapel, the 
timbers being now so worm-eaten as to be unsafe ; to relay 
the floors in the girls' sleeping-rooms, and to provide con- 
crete walks about the grounds. 

To sum up : the trustees believe the value of the Industrial 
School to consist in, first, its system of careful classification of 
the inmates ; second, its system of fitting them as quickly as 
possible to earn their way outside, rather than using their 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 19 

work to secure a revenue for the institution ;. third, its 
system of relying for discipline upon the general method of 
life and work rather than upon any artificial rewards and 
punishments; and fourth, its system of careful supervision 
during a long term of probation. The cost of the school, 
though involving a high rate per capita, is believed not to be 
excessive, in view of the foregoing advantages. 

Eespectfully submitted by the trustees, 

M. H. WALKER, Westborough, President. 
ELIZABETH C. EVANS, Boston, Secretary. 
HENRY C. GREELEY, Clinton, Treasurer. 
M. J. SULLIVAN, Chicopee. 
ELIZABETH C. PUTNAM, Boston. 
CHARLES P. WORCESTER, Newtonville. 
SAMUEL W. McDANIEL, Cambridge. 



20 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



TKUST FUNDS OF LYMAN SCHOOL. 



TREASURER'S ACCOUNT. 



Charles L. Gardner, 



Oct. 


1. 


Nov. 


1. 


Dec. 


21. 



31. 



Lyman Fund. 

Treasurer, in account with Income of Lyman 
Fund. 



Dr. 

Balance former account, $7,497 23 

Interest note, town of Northborough, . . 30 00 
State tax from tax commissioner on account of 

bank stock, 76 01 

Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., . . . 228 00 



Jan. 


29 


Feb. 


18 




18 


April 


1 




1 


May 


1 


July 


1 




18 


Aug. 


1 




1 


Sept. 


30 




30 




30 



1890. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



13. 

13. 

13. 

31. 

1. 

7. 

7. 

16. 
16. 
16. 



Dividend Fitchburg R.R., .... 
Interest on Old Colony R.R. bond, 
Interest on Worcester Street Railway bond, 
Dividend Citizens' National Bank, 
Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 
Interest note, town of Northborough, 
Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 
Dividend Fitchburg R R., . 
Interest on Old Colony R.R. bond, . 
Interest on Worcester Street Railway bond, 
Dividend Boston & Albany &.R., • . 
Dividend Citizens' National Bank, 
Interest on deposit in Palmer National Bank, 

Paid by Order of Trustees. 

Cr. 

Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 
Mary L. Pettit, salary, 
G. T. Fayerweather, salary, . ' . 
Deposit in Peoples' Savings Bank, . 
Deposit in Westborough Savings Bank 
Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 
Mary L. Pettit, salary, 
Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 
Mary L. Pettit, salary, 
T. F. Chapin, superintendent, Christmas enter 
tainment, . . . - . . ? 



184 00 

30 00 

100 00 

100 00 

228 00 

30 00 

228 00 

138 00 

30 00 

100 00 

228 00 

120 00 

121 58 



$9,468 82 





$50 00 




50 00 




72 00 




1,000 00 




1,000 00 




50 00 




50 00 




50 00 




50 00 



50 00 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



21 



189] 


L. 










Jan. 


1. 


Deposit in Worcester County 
Savings, .... 


Institution foi 


$1,000 00 




1. 


Deposit in Worcester Five Cent Savings Bank 


1,000 00 




1. 


Boston & Albany R.R. Co. on new stock, . 


300 00 




16. 


Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 






50 00 




16. 


Mary L. Pettit, salary, 


. 




50 00 


Feb. 


11. 


Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 






50 00 




11. 


Mary L. Pettit, salary, 






50 00 


March 9. 


Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 


. 




50 00 




9. 


Mary L. Pettit, salary, 


. 




50 00 




31. 


Deposit in Amherst Savings Bank, . 




1,000 00 


April 


7. 


Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 


. 




50 00 




7. 


Mary L. Pettit, salary, 


. 




25 00 




7. 


Adams & Slattery, services, 






3 00 




11. 


Charles Warren, purchase of land, . 




15 00 


June 


13. 


Mary L. Pettit, salary, 


. 




100 00 




13. 


Anna L. Wilcox, salaiy, 


. 




100 00 




13. 


T. F. Chapin, superintendent, 
celebration, 


Fourth of 


Jurj 


25 00 


July 


3. 


Mary L. Pettit, salary, 


. 




50 00 




3. 


Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 


. 




50 00 


Aug. 


8. 


Asa F. Howe, salary, . 


. 




18 75 




8. 


Mary L. Pettit, salary, 


. 




50 00 




8. 


Anna L. Wilcox, salary, 


. 




91 28 




14. 


Geo. T. Fay er weather, salary, 


. 




15 00 


Sept. 


22. 


Louis Collin, salary, . 


. 




100 00 




22. 


Mary L. Pettit, salary, 
Balance forward, 


. 




50 00 
2,703 79 



',468 82 



Sept. 30, 1891. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 
H. C. Greeley. 



Mary Lamb Fund, Lyman School. 

Charles L. Gardner, Treasurer, in account with Income of Mary 

Lamb Fund. 

i89o. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Balance of former account, .... 
Dec. 31. Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 

1891. 

April 1. Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 
July 1. Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 
Sept. 30. Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 



$151 93 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 



$191 93 



22 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



1891. 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, 



Cr. 



$191 93 



CHARLES L. 



GARDNER, 

Treasurer. 



Sept. 30, 1891. 
Examined and approved : M. H. "Walker. 
H. C. Greeley. 



Inventory of Lyman School Investments, Lyman Fund. 

Par Value. Market Value. 

114 shares Boston & Albany R.R. stock, . . $ 11,400 00 $22,800 00 

92 shares Fitchburg R.R. stock, . . . 9,200 00 6,900 00 

40 shares Citizen s' National Bank stock, . 4,000 00 4,800 00 

1 $1,000 Old Colony R.R. bond, . . . 1,000 00 1,050 00 

4 Worcester Street Railway bonds, . . 4,000 00 4,000 00 

Note, town of Northborough, ..... 1,500 00 1,500 00 

Deposit Monson Savings Bank, . . . 1,050 80 1,050 80 

Deposit Ware Savings Bank, .... 1,045 49 1,045 49 

Deposit Palmer Savings Bank, . . . 1,040 40 1,040 40 

Deposit Hampden Savings Bank, . . . 1,040 40 1,040 40 

Deposit Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank, . 1,040 40 1,040 40 

Deposit Springfield Institution for Savings, . 1,040 40 1,040 40 

Deposit People's Savings Bank, Worcester, . 1,030 10 1,030 10 

Deposit Worcester County Institution for 

Savings, 1,020 00 1,020 00 

Deposit Westborough Savings Bank, . . 1,030 20 1,030 20 

Deposit Amherst Savings Bank, . . . 1,011 25 1,011 25 

Deposit Worcester Five Cent Savings Bank, . 1,020 00 1,020 00 

Deposit Palmer National Bank, . . . 2,703 79 2,703 79 



Mary Lamb Fund. 

Five shares Boston & Albany R.R. stock, 
Deposit in People's Savings Bank, Worcester, 
Deposit in Palmer National Bank, . . . 



Par Value. 

$500 00 
512 15 
191 93 



Market Value 

$512 15 
191 93 



CHARLES L. GARDNER, 

Treasurer, 



Sept. 30, 1891. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walker. 
H. C. Greeley. 



1891. J PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 23 



TRUST FUNDS STATE INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL. 



Charles L. Gardner, Treasurer, in account with Mary Lamb Fund. 

1890. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Balance of former account, .... $75 35 

Dec. 29. State tax refunded on bank stock, ... 20 17 

1891. 

April 1. Dividend Boston National Bank, ... 32 50 

Sept. 30. Dividend Boston National Bank, ... 32 50 

$160 52 
1890. Cr. 

Nov. 15. Mrs. L. L. Brackett, superintendent, books, . $25 00 

Dec. 16. Mrs. L. L. Brackett, superintendent, Christmas 

entertainment, 25 00 

1891. 

June 13. Mrs. L. L. Brackett, superintendent, Fourth of 

July celebration, 20 00 

16. Mrs. L. L, Brackett, superintendent, expenses 

to Indianapolis, 62 60 

Sept. 30. Balance forward, 27 92 



Sept. 30, 1891. 
Examined and approved : W,. H. "Walker. 

H. C. GrFvEELEY. 



$160 52 



24 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL TEUST FUND. 



Charles L. Gardner, Treasurer, in account with Industrial School 

Trust Fund. 

i89i. Dr. 

Sept. 30. Interest from Chelsea Savings Bank, . $20 40 

Paid by Order of Trustees. 

1891. CR. 

Sept. 30. For highest grade deportment, to eight girls, . $20 40 

CHARLES L. GARDNER, 

Treasurer. 
Sept. 30, 1891. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 
H. C. Greeley. 

Inventory of Industrial School Investments, Mary Lamb Fund, 

1891. Par Value. Market Value. 

Sept. 30. 13 shares Boston National Bank 

stock, $1,300' 00 

Deposit in Palmer National Bank, 27 92 $27 92 

Fay Fund. 

1891. 

Sept. 30. Deposit in Chelsea Savings Bank, . . . $1,020 80 

Rogers Fund. 

1891. 

Sept. 30. One State of Maine 6 per cent, bond, in custody 

of State treasurer, $1,000 00 

CHARLES L. GARDNER, 

Treasurer. 

Sept. 30, 1891. 
Examined and allowed : M. H. "Walker. 
H. C. Greeley. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 25 

1891. 

Sept. 30. Cash received from superintendent for deposit 
to credit of sundry girls from Sept. 30, 1890, 
to Sept. 30, 1891, $1,179 80 

By deposit in savings banks on account of sun- 
dry girls, 1,179 80 

Cash drawn from savings banks on account 
of sundry girls, from Sept. 30, 1890, to Sept. 
30, 1891, 782 61 

By paid amounts drawn from savings banks, . 782 61 

1891. Memorandum of Savings Deposits for Girls. 

Sept. 30. 1 depositor in People's Savings Bank. 

1 depositor in Mercantile Savings Institution. 
3 depositors in Clinton Savings Bank. 
27 depositors in Boston Five Cents Savings Bank. 
53 Depositors in Westborough Savings Bank. 
118 depositors in Palmer Savings Bank. 

CHARLES L. GARDNER, 

Treasurer. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL 



MONSON. 



e. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S EEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

The year closing Sept. 30, 1891, has been a busy one at 
the State Primary School. Early in the year there were 
four cases of diphtheria among the younger children. This 
fact, taken in connection with the fact that there were seven 
similar cases during the previous year, led to the removal of 
the young children from the rooms they had occupied so 
many years, and the entire disuse of them for several weeks. 
The rooms thus vacated, together with all of the rooms in 
the east wing, were thoroughly washed with a solution of 
corrosive sublimate, with a view of destroying such germs 
of disease as might have found lodgement in the walls and 
floors. These vacated rooms have not yet been put to their 
former use, but will soon be occupied as formerly. Early 
in the winter the rooms on the third floor of the office wing 
of the buildings were set apart as a quarantine. Some 
changes were made, and in January a quarantine officer was 
engaged, since which time the small children from among 
the arrivals have been quarantined for a period of two weeks 
before being placed with other children. Only one case of 
diphtheria has appeared since the use of the corrosive subli- 
mate and the establishment of a quarantine, and this case 
broke out in the quarantine department. It seems nearly 
certain that the disease was contracted by the child before 
its arrival, as it came from an unhealthy neighborhood. 
The child died from the disease. This was the only death 
during the year. The physician's report indicates the num- 
ber of inmates treated for disease at the hospital during the 
year ; and, while it shows that a considerable number were 
treated for throat troubles, the total is much less than during 
the previous year. 



30 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

The work in the school-rooms for the year has been well 
done. Some changes in methods and some in matter taught 
have been introduced, and have proved beneficial. The 

average age of the children in the school is less than it was 

© © 

a few years ago, and very few of them reach the point in 
book education that was reached when the children were 
older. The lower classes have contained a much larger 
number of pupils than the upper ones, though the standard 
of admission to the upper classes is lower than it was a few 
years ago. 

The work in manual training has been continued during 
the year, and the amount of work accomplished is equal to 
the labor bestowed. Mr. Tinker resigned his position in 
this department the first of September, and with his depart- 
ure the military drill, which had been under his direction, 
was suspended, and has not been resumed. The appoint- 
ment of Miss Gerve to the position of instructor in manual 
training carried with it the introduction of the Swedish 
system, in which she has had much practical experience. 
The report of the principal of the school is presented with 
this report, and to it your attention is called for statistical 
information concerning the attendance, age, etc. 

It will be seen, by referring to the tables accompanying 
this report and forming a part of it, that the average number 
of inmates during the year has been 329, — 30 less than the 
previous year. The greatest number during the year was 
in October and the least in April, — the extremes being 370 
and 292. At the present time there are 259 boys, 58 girls 
and 12 women. During the year 271 have been placed out 
on trial or on board, and 37 have been discharged. The 
cost of maintaining those who have been in the school during 
the year amounts to $51,636.79, or a weekly per capita cost 
of $3.02. The number of children now on board is 69, — 
an increase of 14 during the year. The total amount ex- 
pended for boarded-out children is $6,355.89, or a weekly 
per capita cost of $1.87. 

Daring the year the school has received donations of 
books, papers and toys, from friends outside, which have 
been very much enjoyed by the children. For all these our 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 31 

thanks are tendered. The officers in the school have been 
faithful in their work, and are worthy of commendation. 
Your advice and assistance have been sought and cheerfully 
given. For this and for all favors bestowed accept my 
thanks. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Oct. 1, 1891. 



AMOS ANDREWS, 

Superintendent. 



32 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Statement A. — Summary of Admissions and Discha') 


ges. 




Boys. 


Girls. 


Women 


Totals. 


Present Sept. 30, 1890, .... 


254 


82 


19 


355 


Received from State Almshouse at Tewks- 
bury, 


22 


10 


3 


35 


Received from Superintendent of In-door 
Poor as juvenile offenders, 


48 


7 


_ 


55 


Received from Superintendent of In-door 
Poor as neglected children, 


64 


32 


_ 


96 


Received from Superintendent of In-door 
Poor as dependent children, . 


9 


1 


_ 


10 


Received from Children's Hospital, Boston, 


1 


1 


- 


2 


Received from Deaf and Dumb Asylum at 
Hartford, 


1 


1 


_ 


2 


Received, not classified, .... 


2 


2 


1 


5 


Returned, placed in previous years, . 


29 


13 


- 


42 


Returned, having been placed out since 
Sept. 30, 1890, 


35 


9 


- 


44 


Totals, 


465 


158 


23 


646 


Discharged by Board of Lunacy and 
Charity, 


16 


12 


9 


37 


Placed out on trial, 


139 


61 


- 


200 


Boarded out in families, .... 


45 


26 


- 


71 


Removed to State Almshouse at Tewks- 
bury, 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


Removed to Lyman School for Boys at 
Westborough, 


1 


- 


_ 


1 


Removed to Deaf and Dumb Asylum at 
Hartford, 


1 


1 


_ 


2 


Died, . 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Eloped, and not returned, .... 


2 


- 


2 


4 


Totals, 


206 


100 


11 


317 


Remaining Sept. 30, 1891, .... 


259 


58 


12 


329 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



33 



Statement B. 

Number of Children received from Superintendent of In-door Poor, as 
Juvenile Offenders. 

During year ending Sept. 30, 1887, 34 

" r « " « 30, 1888, . . . . . .48 

" 30, 1889 36 

" 30, 1890, 55 

" 30, 1891, 55 

Average for 5 years, 45-j- 

Number of Children received from Superintendent of In-door Poor, as 
Neglected Children. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1887, . . . . . . . .23 

" " " 30, 1888, . . .21 

" 30, 1889, . . . . " . . . .75 

" ' " " 30, 1890, 100 

" 30, 1891, 96 

Average for 5 years, 63 



Number of 


Children received from Superintendent of In-door Poor, as 




Dependent Children. 


Year ending Sept. 30, 1887, 9 


" " 


" 30, 1888, 10 


« u 


" 30, 1889, 6 


(( cc 


" 30, 1890, 8 


« ({ 


" 30, 1891, .....!.. 10 


Average for 


5 years, 8-|- 



Number received from State Almshouse. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1887, . . . . . . ' . .76 

" 30, 1888, 48 

" 30, 1889, 59 

" 30, 1890, 55 

" 30, 1891, ... .... 35 

Average for 5 years, . 54-f- 



Number of Children returned from Place, having been placed out in 

Previous Years. 



Year ending Sept. 30, 1887, . . 


. 46 


" 30, 1888, 


. 45 


" 30, 1889, 


. 51 


" 30, 1890, 


. 33 


" 30, 1891, 


. 42 


Average for 5 years, .... 


. 43-f- 



34 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Number of Children returned from Place, having been placed out in 

Current Years. 

Year ending Sept. 30, 1887, 46 

" 30, 1888, 43 

" 30, 1889, 31 

" 30, 1890 33 

" 30, 1891, . . . . . . .44 

Average for 5 years, 39— J— 

Statement C. — Nativity of Inmates. 

The nativity of the 201 persons received during the year (not in- 
cluding those returned from places) is as follows : — 

Native born, 149 

Foreign born, 37 

Unknown, . 15 



Of the foreign born, there were born in 



Arabia, . 


1 


Ireland, . 


4 


Cape Breton, . 


2 


Italy, . . . 


2 


Denmark, 


1 


New Brunswick, . 


. -4 


England, 


. 10 


Nova Scotia, . 


5 


East Indies, . 


1 


Scotland, 


5 


Germany, 


1 


Syria, 


1 



Of those born in the United States, there were born in 



California, 


3 


New York, 


. . 9 


Connecticut, . 


5 


Pennsylvania, 


1 


Maine, . 


3 


Rhode Island, 


2 


Massachusetts, 


. 123 


Vermont, 


1 


New Jersey, . 


1 


Virginia, 


1 



Of the 201 persons received during the year, there were received 
from — 



Amherst, 
Andover, 






1 
1 


Fall River, 
Fitch burg, 






5 

1 


Boston, . 






15 


Haverhill, 






1 


Brookline, 






1 


Hingham, 






1 


Cambridge, 

Charlestown, 

Chelsea, . 

Chicopee, 

Deerfield, 

Dorchester, 






8 
1 
1 
15 
1 
1 


Hyde Park, . 

Holyoke, 

Lawrence, 

Marlborough, 

Melrose, 

Nantucket, 






1 
12 
2 
1 
3 
1 


Dover, . 






1 


Needham, 






1 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



35 



North Adams, 






2 


Taunton, 






1 


North Attleborough, 




1 


Turner's Falls, 






1 


North Brookfield,*. 




4 


Wakefield, . 






4 


North Egremont, 






1 


Waltham, 






1 


Norton, . 






1 


Webster, 






1 


Palmer, . 






14 


West Newton, 






1 


Peabody, 






1 


Westfield, 






7 


Raynham, 






1 


Westford, 






1 


Roxbury, 






1 


West Springfield, 






3 


Sheffield, 






5 


Whitman, 






1 


Somerville, . 






2 


Woburn, 






2 


South Boston, 






3 


Worcester, 






7 


Southwick, 






2 


State Almshouse, 






35 


Springfield, . 






18 











Note. — In addition to the above, there were five others admitted who 
came from homes where they had been placed by the State Board of 
Lunacy and Charity. 



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1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



39 



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40 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



£ 



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O O t^ O O fM X CM CO GO O O CC O <C 'O O O O t^ O O -ft -* i-h -tfi 
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Superintendent, . 
Engineer, . . " . 

Physician, 

Clerk, 

Baker, 

In charge of dining-hall, 

Supervisor, 

Supervisor, 

Supervisor, . . . . . . 

Supervisor 

Expressman, .... 

Matron, 

Assistant matron, 
Assistant matron, 
Assistant matron, 
Assistant matron, 
Housekeeper, .... 
Housekeeper, .... 
Principal and teacher of first class, 
Teacher of second class, 
Teacher of second class, 
Teacher of third class, 
Teacher of third class, 
Teacher of fourth class, 
. Teacher of fourth class, 
Teacher of fourth class, 


5Z5 








Amos Andrews, . 
Joseph II . Kenerson, 
L. A. Calver, M. D , . 
James J. Prentiss, . 
Frank Duffy, 
E G. Buss, . 
Erwin G. Ward, 
Wm. M. Watson, 
Edward E. Walker, 
Frank U. Wetmore, . 
J. M. Sisk, . 
Mrs. M. A. Andrews, 
Miss A. Swinerton, 
Miss Mary N. Reed,. 
Mrs. C. A. Watson, . 
Miss N. J. Rice,. 
Miss Emma A. Moore, . 
Miss Mary L. Boot, 
Miss E. M. Fullington, 
Miss Carrie E. Lacey, 
Miss E. 8. Eoster, . 
Miss G. A. Cheney, 
Miss G. E. Andrews, 
Miss F. G. Bissett, 
Miss G. E. Andrews, . 
Miss Sarah L. Dinsmore, 


o 

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oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 
oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

oooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

O O O O i— I GN X CM CO CO O O O O »0 O O O O i-t >o io o >o o o 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 41 



NOOOmaONOONCONOCOOONOCOiONHOMCOCl^ilOOOOO 
«DOOOCON'OOO^CONOCOOOH05Tf.Cl'OCOiOCOQNCOHO'000 

HOOOiOOHOHQOMiOW(N>OC^MHNOlONO(NNOOO(MOO 

^CnOiOTHOrHCONCNHiO'*OW(MOHCOt>lMON(NCOt>(N-f"fQOO>0 

M(MNH ^ i-H i-H i-H i-H Cq C^l t-H r-H r-4 rH(NG^(MG^<M 




HH h|oh!oo!oh1h looosh-' J©-*!© Ir-i'.Ofr-' OOHC^t- 1 ii->eoio -*|r-l 
i-HfHt-I tH -=^ rH ?— 1 rtHHHH 










Teacher of fourth class, 
Teacher of fifth class and n 
Teacher of sixth class, 
Teacher of seventh class, 
Teacher of kindergarten, 
Teacher of kindergarten, 
Teacher of kindergarten, 
Teacher of manual training 
Teacher of Sloyd, 
Nurse, .... 
Nurse, .... 
Nurse, .... 
Nurse, .... 
Nurse, . . 
Instructor in sewing, . 
Instructor in sewing, . 
Assistant instructor in sewii 
Assistant instructor in sewi 
Tailoress, . 
Assistant tailoress, 
Assistant tailoress, 
Assistant tailoress, 
Supervisor, . . 
Supervisor, . 
Supervisor, . 
Supervisor, . 
Supervisor, . 
Substitute, . 
Assistant in dining-hall, 
Cook, .... 
Hospital cook, 
Laundress, . 






- 


Miss G. A. Cheney, . 
Mrs. S. E. Prentiss, . 
Mrs. H. E. Darte, . 
Miss F. J. Dyer, 

Miss Emma E. Greene, 
Miss M A. Gibson, 
Miss Evelyn A. King, 
Martin B. Tinker, 
Miss Solvi Gkeve, . 
Miss F. A. Ramsay, 
Miss J. E. Gould, . 
Miss L. F. A bell, . 
Miss Kate Bumslead, . 
Miss R. F. Mudge, . 
Mrs. A A. Taylor, 
Mrs. C. R. VVarren, . 
Mrs. S. E. Ward, 
Mks. M. V. Wood, . 
Mrs. J. A. Buss, 
Mrs. L E. Parkhurst, . 
Mrs. J. E. Warren, 
Mrs. S. A. Parkhurst, 
Mrs. C. D. Clark, . 
Mrs. B V. Rand, . 
Mrs. N. G. Harrington, . 
Mrs. 0. B. Warren, 
Miss Louisa Tapley, 
Miss Sadie F. Price, . 
Miss L. E. Preston, . 
Mrs. Jane Julina, . 
Mrs. E. A. Kingman,. 
Miss M. M. Lee, 


ooooooooooooooooo^oooooooooooooo 

iS 5S 12 ^ i? i? iP "* ° IC '° l ° '° *° '^ lC ^ l ^> > >^ 'O 'O «o o »o >o io >o io -£ oo o o 

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42 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



13 

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Assistant laundress, 
Assistant laundress, 
Assistant laundress, 
Assistant laundress, 
Quarantine officer, 
Shoemaker, . 
Watchman, . 
Hospital attendant, 
Farmer, 
Farmer, 
Gardener, 
Gardener, 
Teamster, . 
Teamster, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Fireman, 
Fireman, 










Miss Nellie Harris, 
Miss Bridget Russell, 
Miss Maggie Shea, 
Miss Johanna Halley, . 
Mrs. Margaret McRae, 
S. C. Rogers, 
Willard A. Warren, Jr. 
J. M. Sears, 
John E. Taylor, . 
Edward E. Walker, . 
William A. Warren, 
S. S. Nichols, . 
J. C. Rand, . 
William H. Mason, . 
George H. Miller, . 
A. W. Barlow, 
Frank L. Kingsley, 
William W. Waid, 
John McRae, 
John Johnson, . 
S. S. Nichols, 
Harry Banister, . 
George McDonald, 
George W. Moore, . 
Joseph G. Hart, . 
William A. Warren, 


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€@° Aft 

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1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



43 



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44 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 

Statement G-. — Products of the Farm. 



1891. 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Apples, early, 


661 bushels, . 


$27 40 


Apples, eider, 










200 


30 00 


Apples, winter. 










200 barrels, . 


400 00 


Asparagus, 










2| bushels, . 


5 50 


Beans, shell, . 










151 


21 75 


Beans, string, . 










121 


12 25 


Beef, 










13,024 pounds, . 


806 81 


Beets, 










2681 bushels, . 


143 50 


Cabbage, . 










3,120 heads, . 


152 00 


Celery, 










1,400 bunches, . 


56 00 


Corn fodder, 










6 tons, 


42 00 


Crab apples, . 










41 bushels, . 


4 25 


Cucumbers, 










56i 


43 75 


Eggs, 










315 dozen, 


76 49 


Ensilage, . 










125 tons, 


625 00 


Grapes, . 










8 bushels, . 


16 00 


Hay, 










122 tons, 


1,952 00 


Indian corn, 










125 bushels, . 


93 75 


Ice, . 










375 tons, 


562 50 


Lettuce, . 










38f bushels, . 


19 50 


Mangolds, 










800 


240 00 


Manure, . 










500 cords, 


500 00 


Milk, 










136,075 quarts, . 


5,443 00 


Melons, . 










2,158 pounds, . 


32 37 


Oats, 










70 bushels, . 


38 50 


Oat straw, 










3 tons, 


36 00 


Onions, 










161^ bushels, . 


200 75 


Pears, 










11 


9 75 


Pease, 










2\\ " 


44 75 


Plums, 










4.3 " 

"8 ' 


6 56 


Peppers, . 










If " 


3 50 


Pop-corn, . 










15 


22 50 


Potatoes, . 










1,181 


608 70 


Parsnips, . 










75 


75 00 


Poultry, . 










8891 pounds, . 


77 90 


Pork, 










10,555 


627 03 


Quinces, . 










1 bushel, . 


1 50 


Radishes, . 










95 bnnches, . 


4 75 


Ruta-bagas, 










50 bushels, . 


15 00 


Rhubarb, . 










1,460 pounds, . 


21 90 


Rowen, . 










131 tons, 


162 00 


Rye, . .. 










75 bushels, . 


75 00 


Rye straw, 










4 tons, 


64 00 


Strawberries, 










924 quarts, . 


110 88 


Spinach, . 










23 bushels, . 


9 20 


Squash, summf 


r, 








16f 


9 00 


Squash, winter 










5,400 pounds, . 


216 00 


Sweet corn, 










174 bushels, . 


71 80 


Tomatoes, 










12 


9 60 


Turnips, . 










350 


70 00 


Veal, 










657 pounds, . 


57 50 


Wood, . 










25 cords, 


100 00 












$14,054 89 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



45 



Statement H. — Work done in Sewinq-room No. 1, 



AETICLES. 


Made. 


Repaired. 


Total. 


Aprons, ...... 


528 


317 


845 


Bed spreads, 








10 


23 


33 


Bed ticks, . 








60 


354 


414 


Bibs, . 








115 


- 


115 


Bands, 








2 


_ 


2 


Baby napkins, . 








133 


- 


133 


Blankets, . 








- 


7 


7 


Curtains, . 








45 


1 


46 


Coats, 








12 


227 


239 


Clothes bags, 








1 


2 


3 


Dish cloths, 








37 


_ 


37 


Dresses, 








252 


86 


338 


Drawers, . 








288 


39 


327 


Eye shade, . 








1 


- 


1 


Hose, . 








- 


8,747 


8.747 


Night dresses, . 








107 


- 


107 


Night shirts, 








13 


_ 


13 


Names sewed on, 








45 


_ 


45 


Pillow slips, 








320 


161 


481 


Pillow ticks, 








28 


_ 


28 


Pinning blankets, 
Pants, . 








2 


57 


2 

57 


Penwipers, . 








94 


- 


94 


Pairs shoulder straps, 








32 


_ 


32 


Rugs, . 








- 


7 


7 


Sacks, . 








78 


98 


176 


Shirts, 








- 


1,922 


1,922 


Skirts, 








329 


_ 


329 


Sheets, 








368 


482 


850 


Stand spreads, . 








8 


- 


8 


Sofa cover, . 








1 


_ 


1 


Screen, 








1 


_ 


1 


Table napkins, . 








12 


_ 


12 


Table cloths, 








13 


13 


26 


Towels, 








515 


462 


977 


Waists, 








180 


_ 


180 


Wash cloths, 








96 


- 


96 










3,726 


13,005 


16,731 



46 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Statement I. — Work done in Sewing-room No. 2. 



ARTICLES. 


Made. 


Repaired. 


Total. 


Blouses, 




216 


216 


Caps, . 










273 


113 


386 


Jackets, 










167 


2,375 


2,542 


Kitchen aprons, 










20 


_ 


20 


Mittens, 










3 


_ 


3 


Pants, 










864 


3,841 


4,705 


Shirts, 










1,657 


- 


1,657 


Suspenders, 










278 


52 


330 












3,262 


6,597 


9,859 



Total number of articles made, 
Total number of articles repaired, 



. 6,988 
. 19,602 



26,590 



Statement J. 

Amos Andrews, Superintendent and Disbursing Officer of the State 
Primary School, in Account with the State Treasurer. 

Dr. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1890, $ 100. 00 

received from appropriation for current expenses for 

1890, 7,765 17 

received to cover deficit of 1890, . . . f 4,080 58 11,845 75 
received from appropriation for current expenses for 

1891, 39,791 04 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1890, $1,318 20 

received to cover deficit of 1890, . . . 115 49 1,433 69 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1891 4,922 20 

received from special appropriation for building new 

Coal shed for 1890, $250 00 

received from special appropriation for coal shed, 
water supply, plumbing and drainage for 1891 : — 

coal shed, $469 84 

sewers and drains, «... 385 05 

west reservoir, 1,320 21 

south reservoir, . . . . . 281 25 2,706 35 
received from sales, ... ... 167 50 

$60,966 53 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



47 



Cr. 

Disbursements for three months, ending Dec. 31, 
Disbursements for nine months, ending Sept. 30, 
Payments to State treasurer, .... 
Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1891, .... 



1890, 


. $13,612 49 


1891, 


47,086 54 


„ 


167 50 




100 00 



|60,966 53 

Note. — This institution has no "fund" from which to draw for any 
expenditure whatever. It derives its support wholly from the State 
treasury by annual legislative appropriations. 

The per capita cost for the year is $3.02. This sum shows the cost of 
clothing, food and lodging, medical attendance, teaching and supervi- 
sion, — in brief, the entire expense of maintaining all the inmates of the 
institution, — together with all ordinary repairs, such as must constantly 
be made to keep the buildings and appliances in good condition ; in- 
cluding also the cost of heating and lighting the buildings, and of fur- 
nishing an outfit for all pupils going away from the school, and their 
travelling expenses. 

Children placed out on trial are provided with' two complete suits of 
clothing, with an overcoat extra in cold weather, the whole outfit costing 
on an average $16.00. 

The State appropriations are made for calendar years, while the 
reports of institutions are made for years ending Sejjt. 30. 

It will therefore readily be seen, that, while the expenditures are 
kept •within the yearly appropriations, the expense for the institution 
year may be larger or smaller than the appropriation, including, as it 
does, parts of two calendar years. 



Statement K. — Employment of Children. 
There are employed in the — 





Boys. 


Girls. 


Dormitories and other parts of the house, 




8 


Sewing-room No. 1, 








2 


14 


Sewing-room No 
Dining-hall, 


2, 
















15 
20 


- 


Kitchen, 


















6 


_ 


Shoe shop, 
Bakery, 
Laundry, 
Hospital, 
On the farm 


and 


at th 


e bar 


ns, 












3 

4 

10 

4 

26 


4 


Dormitories and miscellaneous work about the house 






and grounds, 


42 


- 


Girls, 26 ; boys, 132 ; total, 158. 



48 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Statement L. — Children boarded in Families. 

Children boarding in families Sept. 30, 1891, paid for from 

appropriations of State Primary School, .... 69 

Number of days 1 board paid for, 23,704 

Amount paid during the year, $ 6,355 89 

Weekly per capita cost, 1 87 

Note. — This sum does not include expense of investigation of places, 
nor of visiting the children after being located, which is paid by the 
Department of In-door Poor, and increases the cost to the State. 



Statement M. — Recapitulation of Inventory. 

Taken by J. B. Shaw and W. A. Breckenridge of Palmer, Mass., as of 

Sept. 30, 1891. 

Land, $23,014 81 

Buildings, . 100,330 00 

Live stock, 7,374 60 

Products of farm, . . 5,571 50 

Carriages and agricultural implements, .... 3,922 20 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . . .... 10,892 85 

Beds and bedding (inmates'), ...... • 5,001 08 

Other furniture (inmates'), 6,078 87 

Clothing (inmates'), . . 6,243 15 

Superintendent's department, 6,760 75 

Dry goods, 1,817 81 

Groceries and provisions, 2,232 37 

Drugs and medicines, 470 57 

Fuel, 220 00 

Library and school supplies, 1,696 52 

Heating, water and gas (with fixtures), .... 22,30000 

Miscellaneous, 1,601 35 



$205,528 43 



Statement N. — Resources and Liabilities. 

Resources. 

Cash on hand, . . . . , $100 00 

Unexpended appropriations, 14,430 41 

$14,530 41 
Liabilities. 

Miscellaneous bills, 150 00 

$14,380 41 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



49 



Statement O. — Summary of Farm Account. 

Dr. 

To live stock, as per inventory, $7,054 60 

wagons and agricultural implements, as per inventory, . 2,537 66 

paid carpenter, painter, etc., for repairs, .... 192 75 

wages of farm help, 2,022 57 

board of farm help, 987 00 

labor of children, 450 00 

live stock, 184 00 

grain, feed, etc., . . 2,337 24 

hardware, farm tools, etc., 198 38 

blacksmithing and repairs, 163 87 

lumber, 91 47 

harness and repairs, . . 51 30 

seeds, fertilizers, etc., 266 12 

rent of pasture, . . 165 00 

sundries, . . . 40 62 



$16,742 58 
Cr. 

By farm product of 1890, as per inventory, . . . . $4,743 50 

labor for the school, 651 07 

cost of keeping horses used for the school, . . . 312 83 

sale of live stock, 167 50 

beef, 806 81 

veal, 57 50 

pork, 627 03 

eggs and poultry, 154 39 

milk,. 5,443 00 

wood, 100 00 

hay, straw, ensilage, etc., 3,058 82 

fruit and vegetables, 2,179 56 

ice, 562 50 



$18,864 51 



50 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPOKT. 



lo the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

The hospital report of the State Primary School for the 
year ending Sept. 30, 1891, is as follows : — 



Number in hospital Sept. 30, 1890, 
admitted during the year, 
discharged during the year, . 

of deaths, 

remaining in hospital SejDt. 30, 1891, 



32 

824 

825 

1 

30 



The following is a list of the cases admitted 



during 



the 



year, and also of some not admitted but treated at daily 
clinic : — 



Asthma, 


1 


Carbuncle, . 


1 


Abscess of toe, . 


1 


Cholera morbus, . 


7 


Abscess of jaw, . 


2 


Diphtheria, . 


6 


Ankylosis of knee, 


1 


Debility, 


25 


Biliousness, . 


4 


Diarrhoea, . 


41 


Bronchitis, . 


43 


Dysmenorrhea, . 


2 


Cold, .... 


4 


Dermatitis, . 


3 


Coxalgia, 


5 


Dislocated wrist, . 


2 


Curvature of the spine, 


4 


Dislocated toe, 


1 


Cut foot, 


2 


Dislocated finger, 


3 


Cut head, 


2 


Enterocolitis, 


1 


Contused knee, 


6 


Enteral gia, . 


6 


Contused side, 


1 


Epilepsy, 


4 


Contused foot, 


5 


Erythenia, . 


3 


Croup, .... 


8 


Eczema, . 


3 


Croupy, 


4 


Furuncle, 


8 


Cholera infantum, 


1 


Fracture of finger, 


2 


Constipation, 


13 


Fracture of arm, . 


1 


Catarrh, . 


1 


Fracture of clavicle, . 


2 


Chilblains, . 


1 


G astral gia, . 


1 


Convulsion, . 


1 


Headache, . 


59 


Chills, 


2 


Herpes, . 


2 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



51 



Hernia, inguinal, . 


1 


Pemphigus, . 


1 


Hernia, umbilical, 


1 


Psoriasis, 


1 


Hernia, scrotal with paraplegia 


, 1 


Pott's disease with psoas 


abscess, 1 


Indigestion, 


52 


Paralysis, 


1 


Impetigo contagiosa, . 


7 


Rheumatism, 


16 


Keratitis, .... 


4 


Scabies, 


5 


" La grippe, 1 " 


16 


Sprained knee, . 


2 


Laryngitis, . 


1 


Sprained leg, 


1 


Lacerated tongue, 


1 


Sprained ankle, . 


4 


Lumbago, .... 


1 


Sprained shoulder, 


1 


Mumps, .... 


28 


Scrofulosis, . 


6 


Myalgia, .... 


9 


Sore toe, 


40 


Malaria, .... 


2 


Sore throat, . 


9 


Meningitis, .... 


2 


Stomatitis, . 


2 


Neuralgia, .... 


4 


Stomatitis, ulcerative, . 


1 


Oxyurius vermicularis, 


1 


Trachoma, . 


4 


Ophthalmia, 


1 


Tonsillitis, . 


. 100 


Otitis media purulenta, 


12 


Tonsillitis, follicular, . 


14 


Otalgia, .... 


20 


Torticollis, . 


2 


Odontalgia, .... 


2 


Ulcer of cornea, . 


3 


Pharyngitis, .... 


50 


Urticaria, 


2 


Pneumonia, .... 


14 


Unclassified, 


16 


Pertussis, .... 


4 


Vomiting, 


57 


Pleurisy, .... 


1 


Vaccinia, 


14 


Pleurodynia, 


8 







Considering the low physical condition in which many of 
the children enter, they have maintained a fair degree of 
healthfullness. The number of cases admitted is 146 less 
than the number recorded last year. 

Every precaution is taken to prevent the introduction and 
spread of contagious diseases. Each child is examined 
before being allowed to associate with those in the institu- 
tion, and, if under ten years of age, is placed in quarantine 
for two weeks. 

Respectfully submitted, 



LAURA A. CALYER, 

Resident Physician. 



52 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



PRINCIPAL'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the State Primary School. 

The work in the school during the year has been credit- 
able to teachers and pupils, and, when compared with the 
Work of other years, shows a decided gain. 

The average a°:e of the children is less than it has been 
heretofore, therefore they are more impressionable. 

The advantage of the manual instruction introduced into 
the school becomes more apparent as time goes on. As a 
rule, the children find both profit and pleasure in the work 
at the shop, and many consider it a privilege to be allowed 
to give to it some of the time they might devote to play. 

The kindergarten work is now not confined to the very 
little children, as it has been introduced into several classes. 
The fifth class, a class of girls, has done excellent work of 
this kind, particularly in clay modelling, paper folding and 
cutting. They take great delight in the results of their 
work, and seem to consider the things they have made as 
choice treasures. 

In response to your suggestion, the pupils have taken 
great interest in preparing some work for the county fair. 
They have counted it a privilege to be allowed to work for 
this purpose, and have shown much patience in making a 
second, third, and even fourth effort, when the first was 
pronounced unsuccessful. 

The custom of giving entertainments during the winter 
was continued this year. The children were eager to take 
part, and those who were allowed to do so showed consider- 
able ability. 

The following tables give a summary view of the attend- 
ance and classification of the children in the school at this 
date. 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



53 



Number of Pupils admitted and discharged from Oct. 1, 1890 ', to 

Oct. 1,1891. 





Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Pupils in school Oct. 1, 1890, 


249 


76 


325 


Admitted during the year, . . . 


113 


45 


158 


Returned from place once, .... 


40 


18 


58 


Returned from place twice, .... 


7 


1 


8 


Discharged during the year, 


188 


92 


280 




597 


232 


829 



Number of Pupils attending School Sept. 30, 1891. 



No. of Class. 


TEACHEKS. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Total. 


Average 
attend- 
ance. 


Average 

age. 
Years. 


L, . . . 


Miss E. M.Fullington, 


36 


- 


36 


39 


13 


II, . . . 


Miss C. E. Lacey, . 


34 


- 


34 


37 


12.9 


III.,. . . 


Miss G. E. Andrews, 


52 


- 


52 


51 


11.5 


IT.,. . . 


Miss G. A. Cheney, . 


41 


- 


41 


39 


11 


v., . . . 


Mrs. J. J. Prentiss, . 


- 


26 


26 


38 


11.6 


VI , . 


Mrs. H. E. Darte, . 


33 


7 


40 


32 


10.3 


VIL, . . 


Miss F. J. Dyer, 


41 


12 


53 


38 


8 


Kindergarten, . 


Miss E. A. King, 


9 


4 


13 


13 


3.8 


Sloyd, . 


Miss Solvi Greve, 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




246 


49 


295 


287 


10.2 



Respectfully submitted, 



Oct. 1, 1891. 



EUGENIA M. FULLINGTON, 

Principal. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS 



WESTBOROUGH. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

A little more than three years ago a reorganization of 
this school was begun with the avowed intention of making 
its whole work tend to mental stimulation as the initial step 
toward correct moral activity. The following changes have 
been effected. 

The schools have been fairly well graded, a matter of 
more than ordinary difficulty, on account of the maintenance 
of each family as a separate school. The monthly entertain- 
ment has been dropped, as having little educational merit, 
and consuming much valuable time in preparation. Enter- 
tainments, when given, are strictly a by-product of the 
school. 

The plan for the school work has been determined and 
modified largely by the well-recognized deficiencies of the 
boys, and also by aptitudes apparently induced by their 
previous street training. They are, as a rule, very feeble in 
their use and command of the English tongue, while at the 
same time they show but little power of sustained atten- 
tion, — a commonly observed defect in incipient criminals. 

Bearing in mind these facts, no pains is spared to render 
reading very attractive to them, and it is directed, as far as 
possible, in historical channels. To observe, record, com- 
pare, conclude, is set as a cardinal principle wherever it can 
be applied. To give scope for its full application, a very 
simple and elementary plan of field work in plant study has 
been arranged and carried out. To combat their fickleness, 
it is the aim to make every exercise of the day an object of 
interest. Drawing has been changed from a mere copying 
process to drawing from the object, leading up to designing 
and mechanical drawing. The work in this direction is, 
however, only a beginning of what ought to be done. For 
a little over two years, Swedish Sloyd, Americanized by a 



58 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

reduction in the number of models to be made and by the 
addition of working drawings, has been laying the founda- 
tion for industrial training in upwards of four hundred differ- 
ent boys. To military drill there was added in August last 
educational gymnastics, from which much is expected in 
strengthening the will to control the body, encouraging- 
precision of movement, exacting close attention and promot- 
ing rapid mental action. The Ling system is employed, 
believing it to be nearer to an ideal system than any other. 
I will not include, in this hurried resume of educational work 
undertaken, the employment of boys in other directions, 
although this has not been left without thought and an 
earnest effort to adjust it to the general plan proposed. Nor 
will I name some branches of study deemed essential to the 
training of the boy to be an American citizen, in which I 
believe commendable work is being done. 

The following appear to be some of the effects from a 
reformative point of view. There is less of constraint and 
more of spontaneity in their general deportment, which 
indicates greater freedom in the exercise of the will. There 
is more cheerful and prompt obedience. It is the testimony 
of all who have to do with the boys that they are brighter 
and more wide awake, and they are as a rule more courteous. 
There is undoubtedly a more intelligent grasp, on the part 
of the boys as a whole, of correct moral standards. The 
boy detected in lying or stealing is in many cases more easi- 
ly brought to a realizing sense of his wrong position. There 
is also an observable increase in their persistence to over- 
come difficult school tasks. This is a simple and direct effect 
of a method familiar to every thorough teacher. Boys are 
not permitted to turn their backs on unconquered difficulties. 
The teacher is alert to know when the boy's interest is likely 
to flag because he doesn't understand the topic under consid- 
eration, and he is questioned to bring the knowledge he 
already possesses to bear upon the solution of the difficulty 
in hand. No unnecessary question is asked, and so the boy 
is made to feel that he himself is doing the work. The 
boy who is indifferent as to whether he gives correct answers 
according to his best knowledge is a far more rare and curi- 
ous creature here now than he was three years ago. In the 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 59 

school-room and in the manual training room, stress has 
been laid upon honest work, and there are now compara- 
tively few attempts to palm off the exercises of others as 
their own. The manual training teacher says : — 

" When the hoy places the try square upon the wood and 
realizes for the first time what true means, a picture is formed 
in the mind, and we know it by the work produced after- 
wards. Again, a boy easily comprehends the comparison 
that the wrong way is a hard, rough way, whether he planes 
against the grain of the wood or whether he walks against 
the plans of God." * 

An evidence of higher ideals is also found in a greater 
pride in the personal appearance, better use of language, 
choice of subjects for conversation, preference for music of 
a higher class than street songs, interest in historical subjects 
and noted persons, love of the beautiful in nature, quickness 
in criticising errors of speech and deportment in others. 
There is an obvious connection between most of these mani- 
festations and better educational methods. No claim is made 
of originality in plan or method, I only wish to accentuate 
what seems to me too little recognized ; namely, that the 
reform-school boy is not such an exceptional specimen of the 
genus homo that he needs to be treated to other than wise 
methods of instruction, such as the true teacher, from the 
days of Socrates to the present, has employed. 

The number of new commitments shows an increase of 
17 over those of the preceding year, and of 14 over the 
average of the past ten years. Should the rate of commit- 
ments of the last six months be maintained for six months to 
come, the school would be more overcrowded than at any 
time within recent years. 

The number of boys released to go home and to place is 
106, — 17 more than last year. Of these, 4 have been re- 
turned to the school for unsatisfactory conduct, others simply 
for change of place ; 1 disabled by accident. Thirty-eight 
of the boys placed out this year had spent somewhat more 
than two years in the school. This increased the average 

* A rough and restless boy, who had started to run away and who returned volun- 
tarily, when asked why he came back, quoted this sentiment as his reason, with 
evident sincerity. 



60 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

time spent in the school by those released this year a little 
more than four months. No boy has been kept, however, 
after there seemed a reasonable probability that on release 
he would do well. 

The average age of those committed this year is over nine 
months greater than the average age of commitment for last 
year. The delay in sending boys here until as near the 
fifteen-year limit of age as possible, and the marked increase 
in the length of time it has seemed necessary to keep these 
boys before releasing them are facts which go hand in hand. 
This coincidence would have less significance were not the 
increment in age observable for two or three years past, 
the average age of commitment being for 1888, 12.7 years; 
for 1889, 13.07 ; for 1890, 13. 15 ; for 1891, 13.895. 

The visitation of boys in place has been thorough and fre- 
quent, and the effect in keeping them in place and in promot- 
ing good conduct, all that could reasonably be expected, as 
nearly ninety-three per cent, of those under visitation are 
reported to be doing well or fairly well. 

Our numbers have reached a point where I think a bakery 
might be used with considerable advantage and some profit. 
Buying our bread of a baker, we are compelled to buy a 
fine white bread, which is far from being the best thing for 
creating brain and brawn. Besides, the purchase of the 
baked article involves an expenditure of several hundred 
dollars more than it would cost to make the bread ourselves, 
including the salary of the instructor. An incidental advan- 
tage of a bakery would be the furnishing of an additional 
branch of industrial training for a limited number of boys. 
The construction of a suitable building for a bakery and 
store-house would probably cost three or four thousand dollars. 

Our present mode of lighting by gasolene and kerosene is 
far from satisfactory, besides being somewhat unsafe, untidy, 
and to a degree unhealthy. Aside from the unsatisfactory 
light, the air of our school-rooms at evening is rendered 
heavy and injurious to the health of the boys, and the effi- 
ciency of the school work is in no small degree hampered 
thereby. The gain in the respects named of lighting by 
electrical means seems to warrant a careful consideration of 
the feasibility and the advantages of such a change. The 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



61 



improved methods of wiring make the incandescent lamp a 
perfectly safe instrument, and, as no new building or boiler 
would be required, reliable estimates furnished point to a 
very moderate outlay for plant complete. As a sufficient 
pressure of steam is carried at all times to run our pumping 
engine, no additional officers would be required to run it, 
and only a moderate amount of extra coal. 

The gross per capita cost is $4.44 per week, — a slight 
increase over that of last year. This is due to a somewhat 
larger outlay for ordinary repairs, made necessary by the bad 
condition of old buildings ; also to the addition of another 
family house, and to higher cost for grain and meal, while 
at the same time our average number for the year is two 
less than last year. That the legitimate per capita cost of 
maintenance is increasing with additional houses, would be 
an unfair inference, as the following table shows : — 

Weekly per capita cost for — 





1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


Clothing, provisions and groceries, 
Fuel and lights, . 
Salaries, wages and labor, . 


fl 32 
32 

1 87 


$1 39 

38 
2 00 


n 15 

38 
1 66 


n 20 

42 
1 76 


Total, 


$3 51 


|3 77 


$3 10 


m 38 



The additional cottage, for which appropriation was made 
in 1890, has been completed without contract labor and 
within the appropriation. It is a thoroughly substantial and 
satisfactory building. 

My relations with my officers have been kindly and pleas- 
ant, and they have generally manifested a desire to co-oper 
ate with me in all my efforts. 

The cordial and generous treatment I have ever received 
from a most lenient Board of Trustees is a thing gratefully 
remembered and keenly appreciated. 

Respectfully submitted, 



THEODORE F. CHAPIN, 

Superintendent. 



62 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct, 



Table No. 1. 



Showing the Number received and discharged, and the General 
Condition of the School, for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1891. 



Boys in school Sept. 30, 1890, . 
Received. — Since committed, 

Returned from places, 



185 
109 
21 130 



Whole number in school during the year, 



315 



Released. — On probation to parents, . . . . .55 

On probation to others, 44 

To Massachusetts Reformatory, .... 5 

To State Farm, Bridgewater, .... 2 

To Massachusetts General Hospital, ... 1 

As unfit subjects, ...... 1 

By elopement, ....... 6 

Died, 1 

Remaining in school Sept 30, 1891, 



115 



200 



Table No 2. 



Shoiving the Admissions, Number discharged, and Average Number 
of Each Month. 



MONTHS. Admitted. 


Discharged. 


Average No. 


1890. 








October, 


,8 


5 


186.16 


November, ...... 


10 


8 


188.86 


December, ...... 


7 


7 


189.93 


1891. 








January, 


8 


20 


183.19 


February, 












7 


14 


176.50 


March, 
April, 
May, . 












10 
19 
18 


9 

16 
13 


170.35 
170.40 
177.96 


June, . 
July, . 












16 
16 


10 
12 


180.93 
185.03 


August, 












15 


6 


195.25 


September, 












17 


16 


203.03 


Totals, 












151 


136 


183.96 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



63 



Table No. 3. 

Showing the Commitments from the Several Counties the Past Year 

and previously. 



COUNTIES. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, .... 


1 


50 


51 


Berkshire, 








9 


218 


227' 


Bristol, 








9 


565 


574 


Dukes, 








1 


13 


14 


Essex, 








8 


1,013 


1,021 


Franklin, . 








1 


53 


54 


Hampden, 








12 


361 


373 


Hampshire, 








1 


78 


79 


Middlesex, 








25 


1,107 


1,132 


Nantucket, 








- 


16 


16 


Norfolk, . 








2 


940 


942 


Plymouth, 








2 


116 


118 


Suffolk, . 








30 


1,244 


1,274 


Worcester, 








8 


695 


703 


Totals, 








109 


6,469 


6,578 



Table No. 4. 

Showing Nativity of Parents of Boys committed during the Year. 

Fathers born in United States, 10 

Mothers born in United States, 10 

Fathers foreign born, 18 

Mothers foreign born, 5 

Both parents born in United States, 20 

Both parents foreign born, 53 

Unknown, 7 

One parent unknown, 8 



Showing Nativity of Boys committed during the Year. 

Born in the United States, 

Foreign born (9 in Canada), 



86 
23 



109 



64 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Table No. 5. 

Showing by what Authority the Commitments have been made the 

Past Year. 



COMMITMENTS. 


Past Year. 


By district court, ......... 

municipal court, ........ 

police court, ......... 

superior court, 

trial justices, ......... 

State Board of Lunacy and Charity, .... 


51 

20 

32 

2 

3 

1 


Total, 


109 



Table No. 6. 
Shoiving Age of Boys when Committed. 



AGE. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Six, 




5 


5 


Seven, 










- 


25 


25 


Eight, 










- 


118 


118 


Nine, 










- 


235 


235 


Ten, . 










- 


446 


446 


Eleven, 










- 


647 


647 


Twelve, 










14 


749 


763 


Thirteen, 


, 








34 


913 


947 


Fourteen, 










58 


1,206 


1,264 


Fifteen, 










- 


898 


898 


Sixteen, 










- 


930 


930 


Seventeen, 








- 


280 


2^0 


Eighteen and over, 








- 


59 


59 


Unknown, 








3 


31 


34 


Total, 










109 


6,542 


6,651 



Average age of boys, 13.895. 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 



65 



Table No. 7. 

Shoiuing the Domestic Condition of Boys who have been Inmates of 
the School during the Year. 



CONDITION. 


Number. 


Had parents, 








166 


no parents, . 








20 


father, 








58 


mother, . 








65 


step-father, . 








18 


step-mother, 








29 


intemperate father, 








95 


intemperate mother, . 








8 


both parents intemperate, 








41 


parents separated, 








17 


attended church, . 








295 


never attended church, 








13 


never attended school, 








1 


not attended school within one year, . 




49 


two years, 




17 


three years, 




15 


been arrested before, 




213 


been inmates of other institutions, 




60 


used intoxicating liquor, .... 




52 


used tobacco (mostly cigarettes) , 




227 


Were employed in mill or otherwise when arrested, 




128 


idle, .... 


. 




88 


attending school, 


. 




91 


Could not read or write, 


. 




16 


Could not write, . 


. 




3 


Parents owning residence, . 


. 




46 


Members of family had been arrested, 




123 



66 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Table No. 8. 



Showing Length of Time the Boys who have left the Past Year 
have spent in the School since Commitment. 



3 months or less, 






. 1 


2 years 3 months, 






. 4 


4 months, 








. 1 


2 « 4 






. 4 


5 








. 1 


2 " 5 






. 3 


6 








. - 


2 " 6 






. 2 


7 








. - 


2 " 7 






. 4 


8 








. - 


2 " 8 






. 1 


9 








. - 


2 " 9 






. 1 


10 








. - 


2 " 10 






. 1 


11 








. 1 


2 " 11 






. 3 


1 year, . 








. 1 


3 years, . 






. 1 


1 " 1 month, 






1 


3 " 1 month, 






. - 


1 " 2 months, 






. - 


3 " 2 months, 






2 


1 " 3 






1 


3 " 3 






- 


1 " 4 






4 


3 " 4 






1 


1 " 5 






6 


3 " 5 






2 


1 » 6 






15 


3 " 6 






- 


1 " 7 






14 


3 " 7 






- 


1 " 8 






7 


3 " 8 






- 


1 " 9 






6 


3 " 9 






- 


1 » 10 






8 


3 " 10 






- 


1 " 11 






4 


3 « 11 






- 


2 years, . 






6 


4 years and more, . 






- 


2 " 1 month, . 
2 " 2 months, . 






6 
3 


Total, . . . 115 





Average time spent in the institution, 22.6 months. 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



67 



Table No. 9. 



Comparative Table, showing Average Numbers, New Commit- 
ments, etc., for a Period of Ten Years. 





Average 
Number. 


New Com- 
mitments. 


Returned 
for any 
Cause. 


Placed on 
Probation. 


Discharged 
Otherwise. 


1881-82, 








113.61 


108 


39 


146 


11 


1882-83, 








114.28 


100 


14 


125 


19 


1883-84, 








128.80 


fl38 


33 


81 


43 


1884-85,* 








112.18 


64 


33 


81 


71 


1885-86, 








92.82 


59 


44 


90 


18 


1886-87, 








104.32 


93 


31 


80 


16 


1887-88, 








127.24 


99 


38 


91 


22 


1888-89, 








168.23 


124 


39 


93 


19 


1889-90, 








186.46 


92 


19 


89 


16 


1890-91, 








183.96 


109 


21 


99 


16 


Average fc 


rten 


year 


s, 


133.19 


98.6 


31.1 


97.5 


25.1 



* April, 1885, removed to present location. 

f First year after the reduction of the age for admission from seventeen to four- 
teen years. 



68 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Report of Sewing-room for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1891. 



Articles Made 




Articles Repaired 




Aprons, 




89 


Aprons, 






16 


Aprons, leathered, 




20 


Bed spreads, 






13 


Bed spreads, 






88 


Blankets, 






7 


Braces, . 






32 


Bolster cases, 






1 


Caps, . 






200 


Braces, . 






94 


Dish cloths, . 






66 


Coats, . 






24 


Dish towels, . 






46 


Jackets, 






115 


Holders, 






25 


Napkins, 






40 


Jackets, white, 






3 


Pantaloons, . 






436 


Napkins, 






90 


Pillow slips, . 






349 


Pantaloons, . 






455 


Robes, . 






3 


Pillow slips, . 






378 


Sheets, . 






308 


Sheets, . 






257 


Shirts, . 






464 


Shirts, . 






488 


Table cloths, 






103 


Table cloths, 






33 


Towels, 






248 


Towels, 






407 

2,677 


Vests, . 

Total, . 






4 


Total, . 


2,225 


Average number ( 
Number of differ e 


)f bo 
nt be 


ys en 
>ys ei 


lployed, 
nployed 


, i i • 






5 
21 



Laundry Work for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1891. 



Number pieces washed, . 
Number pieces ironed, 
Number pieces starched, . 
Average number of boys employed, 
Number of different boys employed, 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 69 



PRINCIPAL'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the Lyman School for Boys. 

It is with a feeling of encouragement in certain directions 
that I again present to yon the annual report of our school 
work. We began the year with an attendance of 185 ; our 
number has, at times, been as high as 207, our average being 
183.96. Of this number the majority of new-comers have 
been those prepared only for the C and D classes. Among 
these were some cases that seemed almost mentally hopeless ; 
but, greatly to our surprise, their mental powers have been 
quickened, and an ambition to learn has been aroused to 
such an extent that some have even made up the work of 
one class and been promoted to a higher grade. 

In the more advanced classes far greater interest has been 
manifest and more rapid progress has been made than here- 
tofore, so that twelve of the older, more ambitious boys 
have been allowed to take up the study of algebra, geometry 
and literature, in which they are doing well. This is attrib- 
utable in a measure at least to the closer grading of the 
school. The boys of these classes seem also to have become 
more susceptible to moral impressions. 

No material changes have been made in the plan of our 
work, though we have aimed at a higher standard of attain- 
ment. For instance, in our drawing and observation work 
during the last few months of the year the boys did consid- 
erable in the line of making original designs and in color 
work, displaying ingenuity, taste and care, which one could 
hardly look for in the class of boys with which we have to 
deal. 

Excellent opportunities for improvement are afforded, and, 
though these are not appreciated by some,' yet the majority 
seem eager to learn, after an impetus in the right direction 
has once been given. 



70 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

A number of books of reference for the use of teachers in 
the preparation of their work have been added to the library ; 
also considerable supplementary reading for the pupils, all 
of which have been found to be of great value and have 
been highly appreciated. 

The periodicals which are so generously furnished are 
greatly enjoyed, as they afford subject for thought and con- 
versation. Especially is this true of the educational journals. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARY L. PETTIT, 

Principal. 
Westborough, Mass., Oct. 1, 1891. 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



71 



TKEASUKEK'S EEPOKT. 



1890 



1891 



October, received from 


the State Treasurer, . 


$3,052 13 


November, " ' 


« 


' 


2,849 79 


December, " ' 


i Li i 


4 


4,077 11 


January, " ' 


' 


' 


3,317 94 


February, " ' 


; u * 


' 


3,521 02 


March, 


' 




3,192 11 


April, " ' 


; 


' 


3,738 31 


May, 


in i 


' 


3,534 39 


June, " ' 


' 


' 


4,195 37 


July, 


' 


' 


4,903 83 


August, " ' 


to. i 


' 


2,631 00 


September, " 


C l( I 


' 


3,463 88 



|42,476 88 



Bills Paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 

1890 — October, $3,052 13 

November, 2,849 79 

December, 4,077 11 

1891 — January, 3,317 94 

February, 3,521 02 

March, 3,192 11 

April, 3,738 31 

May, . 3,534 39 

June, 4,195 37 

July, 4,903 83 

August, 2,631 00 

September, 3,463 88 

$42,476 88 



72 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Amount drawn from State Treasury. 

Special Appropriation {Acts of 1890, Chap. 65). 

1890 — October, $1,213 33 

November, 1,339 51 

December, 1,604 41 

1891 — February, 2,722 79 

March, 2,220 53 

April, 802 48 

July, 1,349 54 



$11,252 59 



Amount Drawn from State Treasury. 

Special Appropriation {Acts of 1891, Chap. 347). 

1891 — July, $2,497 37 



Expenditures. 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Special Appropriation 
(Acts of 1890, Chap. 65), 

1890 — October, . 

November, 
December, 

1891 — February, 

March, 
April, . 
July, . 



$1,213 33 


1,339 51 


1,604 41 


2,722 79 


2,220 53 


802 48 


1,349 54 


|11,252 59 



Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Special Appropriation 
(Acts of 1891, Chap. 347). 

1891 — July, $2,497 37 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



73 



Expenditures for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1891. 



Salaries of officers and employees, .... $16,069 86 
Wages of other persons temporarily employed, . 762 50 



$16,832 36 



Provisions and grocery supplies, including — 



Meat, 


$1,235 


01 


) 


Fish, 


442 


3( 




Eggs, 


217 


62 




Larcl, 


73 


5( 




Potatoes, 


101 


6C 




Fruit and vegetables, . 


331 


6( 




Bread, 


3,729 


41 




Flour and cereals, 


418 


9S 




Beans and peas, 


348 


6C 




Ice, 


114 


7£ 




Tea, coffee, cereal coffee and chocolate, 


272 


6£ 




Sugar and molasses, 


696 


6c 




Butter and cheese, , . . 


941 


42 




Salt and other spices, ..... 


68 


0£ 




Nuts and candy, 


14 


61 




SoajD and other washing material, 


412 


3C 




Other groceries and provisions, 


9 


11 


- 9,428 35 








Clothing of all kinds, ..... 






2,077 89 


Fuel and lights, 






4,058 60 


Medicines and medical supplies, 






59 24 


Furniture, beds and bedding, .... 


. 




1,824 44 


School property, books and supplies, 


. 




949 52 


Ordinary repairs, 






2,571 29 


Horse and cattle shoeing, 






144 43 


Express, freight and passenger fares, 


. 




771 25 


Stationery, postage, telegrams and newspapers, 






374 78 


Seeds, plants and fertilizers, farm tools and repairi 


ng same, 


1,196 95 


Water, 






330 00 


Printing material, 






161 32 


Live stock, 






543 20 


Grain, feed and meal for stock, 


■ 




. 1,153 26 


Total, 


.$42,476 88 



74 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Superintendent's Report of Cash Transactions. 







Farm 

^Produce 

Sales. 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Sales. 


Labor 

of 
Boys. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


1890. 












October, . Received cash from, . 


$10 69 


- 


$1 76 


- 


$12 45 


November, . " «« " 


15 17 


$9 82 


75 


$4 00 


29 74 


December, . 


" . 


5 54 


- 


5 45 


- 


10 99 


1891. 














January, . " " " 


15 29 


1 50 


S 00 


- 


24 79 


February, . : " '« " 


31 57 


- 


1 01 


- 


32 58 


March, . . " " " 


20 29 


- 


1 75 


- 


22 04 


April, . . " " " . 


2 75 


- 


4 25 


10 


7 10 


May, . " » " 


66 37 


- 


1 24 


10 


67 71 


June, . " " " 


36 05 


2 45 


3 75 


- 


42 25 


July, . " « 


126 21 


9 95 


3 25 


- 


139 41 


August, . " " " 


68 20 


- 


31 99 


- 


100 19 


September, . '• " " 


87 60 


1 00 


697 60 


• - 


786 20 


Totals, 





$485 73 


$24 72 


$760 80 


$4 20 


$1,275 45 



Super inteyideiit' 's Report of Cash Transactions. — Disbursements. 







Farm 

Produce 

Sales. 


Miscel- 
laneous 
Sales. 


Labor 

of 
Boys. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


1890. 














October, 


Paid State Treasurer, . 


$10 69 


- 


$1 76 


- 


$12 45 


November, . 




15 17 


$9 82 


75 


$4 00 


29 74 


December, . 




5 54 


- 


5 45 


- 


10 99 


1891. 














January, 




15 29 


1 50 


8 00 


- 


24 79 


February, . 




31 57 


- 


1 01 


- 


32 58 


March, . 




20 29 


- 


1 75 


- 


22 04 


April, . 




2 75 


- 


4 25 


10 


7 10 


May, 




66 37 


- 


1 24 


10 


67 71 


June, . 




36 05 


2 45 


3 75 


- 


42 25 


July, . 




126 21 


9 95 


3 25 


- 


139 41 


August, 




68 20 


- 


31 99 


- 


100 19 


September, . 




87 60 


1 00 


697 60 


- 


786 20 


Totals, 


$485 73 


$24 72 


$760 80 


$4 20 


$1,275 45 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



75 







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76 PRIMARY AXD REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

The following summary of 467 cases presented for treat- 
ment during the year makes account of every complaint, 
however slight, and includes about 100 which had no objec- 
tive symptoms, the only evidence of illness being the boys' 
statements. 

One hundred and twenty-two patients occupied the hospital 
613 days. Of these ailments, 68 resulted from preventable 
causes, 21 from constitutional defects, 13 from accidents, 
leaving 20 from causes unrecognized. 

The sickness throughout the year has been of an ordinary 
character, with a few exceptions, without epidemic or con- 
tagious disease. Three cases of pneumonia recovered. 

The most serious cases were the following : — 

In November a boy was returned to the school with a use- 
less arm, resulting from a badly dressed fracture. The de- 
formity was so serious that he was sent to the Massachusetts 
General Hospital for operation. 

December 2, another, who was lame from former hip dis- 
ease, fell and injured the joint, causing active inflammation. 
He was in bed forty-eight days without improvement, when 
he was taken to the .Massachusetts General Hospital March 
19, where he was operated on. 

Two cases of hernia have been provided with trusses. 

Three boys with defective eyes have been sent to the in- 
firmary in Boston. 

A boy was taken with tetanus July 23. and died after an 
illness of twelve days. 

One was returned to the school with paralysis, caused by 
an accident ; he remained in the hospital twenty-six days, 
when he was sufficiently recovered to go into a family. 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCOIEXT — Xo. 18. 



. i 



Another, taken with typhoid fever September 24.. is now in 
the hospital. 

It is evident to me that many boys complain and are sent 
to the hospital whose ailment is an indisposition to labor : 
these are the most difficult cases to diagnose, and give us no 
small amount of trouble : but we are willing to examine them, 
rather than have one real disease escape early detection. 

The appearance of typhoid fever at the school has natu- 
rally called special attention to the drainage of the buildings. 
In at least one instance it proves faulty, and to most of the 
houses it would be a great advantage if. besides the supply 
of simpler and cleanlier sanitary arrangements, a connection 
with the town sewer could be added. The sewer now comes 
within easy reach of the school. 

A careful comparison of the health, statistics of the different 
houses up to the time of the appearance of typhoid fever has 
not shown that the hygienic condition of one house differs 
materially from that of another. 

The following table gives the general health statistics by 
months : — 







1*90 








1*91 


• 












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= 

-: 




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| 


>> 


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. 


- 


- 


1 3 11 


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81 


14 


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- ' 


(12:2 patient?" , 


1 5] 


52 88 


19 


- 


59 


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- 


1 


Xunaber of .;?;:*. 




: : 13 




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: 


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10 


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] : 


16a 



Respectfully submitted. 

F. E. COREY 



Physx 



Wbstborough, Sept v 



78 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



FARMER'S BEPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the Lyman School for Boys. 

I respectfully present the following report for the year 
ending Sept. 30, 1891. 

The past year has been favorable for all crops raised here 
on the farm, with the single exception of a slight falling off 
in the hay crop on old fields. Seven acres have been seeded 
down to grass the past season, which will increase our crop 
another year. 

A large amount of vegetables of various kinds has been 
raised, which will give an abundance for all the families. 

Our labor the past season has been largely devoted to 
clearing the Wilson pasture of stones. Eight and one-half 
acres have been broken up and planted, four of which will 
be seeded this fall to rye. 

A large amount of fencing has been done, taking in all 
the hitherto waste land on the Wilson farm, which will be 
devoted to pasture for young stock. 

All farm work has been done by the boys, without extra 
help, under the direction of their masters. 

Our teams and stock are all in healthy condition. A few 
young cows have been added to our herd the past year. 

The silo, which has proved a success, has been filled to its 
utmost capacity. I would recommend that it be enlarged 
another season, so that more stock can be kept. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my thanks to you and to 
the officers in general for your help throughout the year. 

The annexed schedule shows the production of the farm. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. F. McFARLAND. 

Westborough, Sept. 30, 1891. 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



79 



Summary of Farm Account for Twelve Months, ending Sept. 

30, 1891. 

Dr. 



Live stock, agricultural iraplem 
produce on hand, as appraised S( 
Board, 


ents 
jpt. 3 


and 

0, 18 


farn 
50, 


l 
$6,786 61 
305 50 




Farm tools and repairs to same, 
Fertilizer, .... 
Grain and meal, . 








365 71 
573 96 
973 24 




Horse and cattle shoeing 1 , 
Incidentals, .... 








105 83 
12 48 




Labor of boys, 

Live stock, .... 








370 75 
543 20 




Seeds and plants, . . . 

Wages, 

Water, 








185 61 

613 81 

20 00 




Net gain for twelve months, . 










|10,856 70 
2,117 86 



f 12,974 56 



Cr. 



Apples, 62 barrels, . 










$91 50 


Apples, cider, 50 bushels, 










7 50 


Asparagus, 12£ dozen, 










18 25 


Beans, shell, 10J bushels, 










10 50 


Beans, string, 29 bushels, 










21 88 


Beans, cranberry, \ bushel, 










1 00 


Beans, Lima, 3 bushels, . 










3 00 


Beef, 6,726 pounds, . 










467 61 


Beet greens, 10i bushels, 










3 07 


Beets, 32 bushels, . 










19 65 


Blackberries, 701 quarts, 










70 58 


Cabbage, 489 heads, 










24 55 


Carrots, 4 bushels. . 










2 21 


Cash for asparagus, 38| dozen, 








67 79 


Cash for blackberries, 1,634 quarts, 








144 48 


Cash for calves sold, 14, . 








17 00 


Cash for hay, . 










25 87 


Cash for hides and tallow, 










25 52 


Cash for onions, 18 barrels, 










61 61 


Cash for pease, 8^ bushels, 










8 05 


Cash for potatoes, 58 barrels, . 










70 59 


Cash for raspberries, 240 quar 


ts, . 








28 73 


Cash for strawberries, 140 quarts, 








29 64 


Cash for swill, 








1 05 


Cash for tomatoes, 18 bushels, 










5 40 



80 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Cash for weighing, . 

Cauliflower, 22 heads, 

Celery, 10 heads, 

Cherries, 29 quarts, . 

Citron melons, 120, . 

Crab apples, li bushels, 

Cucumbers, 92 dozen, 

Cucumbers for pickling, If bushels 

Currants, 9 quarts 

Eggs, 2031 dozen, 

Hay, 4i tons, . 

Hides given in exchange for butchering 

Labor for institution, men and teams, 

Lettuce, 1021 dozen, 

Milk, 53,861 quarts, . 

Muskmelons, 125, . 

Onions, 241 "bushels, 

Pears, 24 bushels, . 

Pease, 81 bushels, . 

Pork, 3,450 pounds, . 

Potatoes, 2911 bushels, 

Poultry, 41| pounds, 

Pumpkins, 1 dozen, . 

Radishes, 152| dozen, 

Raspberries, 339 quarts, 

Rhubarb, 99 pounds, 

Spinach, 171 bushels, 

Squash, summer, 61 barrels 

Squash, winter, 8 barrels, 

Strawberries, 264 quarts, 

Sweet corn, 573 dozen, 

Tallow, 366 pounds, 

Tomatoes, 38f bushels, 

Turnips, 164. bushels, 

Watermelons, 160, . 

$5,735 32 

Live stock, agricultural implements and farm jDroduce on 

hand, as appraised Sept. 30, 1891, 7,239 24 



$1 


00 


2 


78 




50 


3 08 


12 00 


1 


13 


6 


14 


2 


75 


1 


08 


53 


49 


76 


50 


11 


00 


1,824 


87 


20 


56 


1,737 


66 


12 


50 


20 58 


12 


00 


87 


75 


207 


00 


167 


38 


6 


49 


1 


20 


11 


92 


43 


65 


2 


70 


7 


00 


4 


38 


5 


18 


39 


14 


64 86 


9 


14 


25 


25 


9 


63 


16 


00 



$ 12,974 56 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



81 



Produce of the Farm on Hand Oct. 1, 1891, and not delivered 

at School. 



Beets, cattle, 700 bushels 
Beets, turnip, 110 bushels 
Cabbage, 17 tons, . 
Carrots, 680 bushels, 
Celery, 

Corn, 160 bushels, . 
Corn fodder, 14 tons, 
Ensilage, 60 tons, 
Hay, English, 27 tons, 
Hay, oat, 9 tons, 
Hay, stock, 6 tons, . 
Hay, swale, 8^ tons, . 
Horse-radish, . 
Melons and citron melons, 
Onions, 90 barrels, . 



$154 00 

33 00 

340 00 

170 00 

25 00 

112 00 

112 00 

270 00 

459 00 

126 00 

72 00 

68 00 

25 00 

8 00 

180 00 



Parsnips, 45 bushels, 
Peppers, 2 bushels, 
Potatoes, 371 bushels, 
Rowen, 1J tons, 
Salsify, 20 bushels, 
Squash, 9 tons, 
Squash, small, 
Sweet corn, 12 bushels 
Tomatoes, 50 bushels, 
Turnips, flat, 325 bushels, 
Turnips, ruta-baga, 460 
bushels, 



$22 50 

2 00 

185 50 

21 00 

10 00 

180 00 

5 00 

8 40 

12 50 

48 75 

77 22 



$2,726 87 



Asparagus, 

Blackberries, . 

Calves, 

Hay, . 

Hides and tallow, 

Onions, 

Pease, 



Farm Bales 

$67 79 

144 48 

17 00 



25 87 

25 52 

61 61 

8 05 



Potatoes, 
Raspberries, 
Strawberries, 
Swill, . 
Tomatoes, 



$70 59 

28 73 

29 64 
1 05 
5 40 

$485 73 



Live Stock. 



Bull, one, . 
Bull calf, one, . 
Calves, three, . ■ 
Cows, seventeen, 
Ducks, six, 
Fowls, forty-one, 
Heifers, six, 
Hogs, seventeen, 



$100 00 


50 00 


24 00 


680 00 


4 00 


16 40 


200 00 


192 00 



Horse, " Major, Jr." 
Horse, " Jerry," 
Horses, one pair, bay, 
Horses, one pair, black, 
Oxen, two yoke, 



$150 00 
125 00 
400 00 
500 00 
250 00 

$2,691 40 



Farming implements, including wagons, machines, tools, etc., $2,095 97 

Summary. 

Produce on hand, $2,726 87 

Produce sold, 485 73 

Produce consumed, 3,423 92 

$6,636 52 

Live stock, 2,691 40 

Agricultural implements, 2,095 97 



$11,423 89 



82 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



SUMMARY. 



Real Estate. 



Fifty-eight acres tillage, . 
Thirty-six acres pasturage, 
Brady land, . . . • . 
Willow Park land, 
Wilson land, seventy-two acres, 



$10,800 0C 
1,800 00 
1,300 00 
1,500 00 
4,000 00 



$19,400 00 



Buildings 



Superintendent's house, 

" Theodore Lyman Hall," 

" Hillside Cottage, 1 ' 

" Maple Cottage," 

" Willow Park," . 

" Wayside Cottage," 

New cottage, 

Chapel, 

Farm barn and shed: 

Armory, 

Horse barn, 

New store barn, 

Willow Park hall, 

Coal sheds, 



$8,000 00 


38,000 00 


15,000 00 


3,500 00 


5,600 00 


5,500 00 


16,000 00 


3,700 00 


1,200 00 


500 00 


2,000 00 


400 00 


400 00 


400 00 

100.200 00 



Personal Estate. 
Beds and bedding, inmates 1 , 
Carriages and agricultural implements, . 

Dry goods, 

Drugs, medicines and surgical instruments, 

Carried forward, . . . . . 



$2,314 39 


2,433 07 


132 54 


300 00 



$5,180 00 $119,600 00 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 83 

Brought forward, $5,180 00 $119,600 00 

Fuel and oil, 2,712 60 

Library, 812 95 

Live stock, -. . . 2,691 40 

Machinery and mechanical fixtures, . . . 4,473 80 

Other furniture, inmates', . . . . . 3,110 36 

Personal property, superintendent's department, 10,085 16 

Provisions and groceries, 707 27 

Produce on hand, . . . ... 2,726 87 

Ready-made clothing, 2,535 38 

35,035 79 



Total, $154,635 79 

G. P. HEATH, 
LEWIS RICE, 

Appraisers, 
A true copy. Attest : T. F. Chapin, Supt. 
Westborough, Sept. 30, 1891. 



84 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

LIST OF SALARIED OFFICERS NOW 
EMPLOYED. 



Theodore F. Chapin, superintendent, 

Mrs. T. F. Chapin, matron, 

George F. Billiard, assistant superintendent, 

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Howe, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. I. T. Swift, charge of family, , 

Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Jones, charge of f amity, , 

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Keith, charge of family, . 

Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Perkins, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. Q. A. Norton, charge of family, 

Mr. and Mrs. H. I. Shillings, charge of family 

F. E. Corey, M.D., physician, . 

Miss Emma F. Newton, teacher, 

Miss Annie J. Blanchard, teacher, 

Miss Kate E. Coney, teacher, . 

Miss Mary E. Penniman, teacher, 

Miss Evelyn Northrop, teacher, 

Miss Jennie E. Nye, teacher, . 

Miss Lena Rumery, teacher, 

M. Everett Howard, teacher of printing, . 

Miss Anna L. Wilcox, teacher of manual training, 

Miss Fannie S. Mitchell, seamstress, 

Mrs. Geo. F. Bullard, housekeeper, superintendent' 

Miss Mary Custer, nurse, 

Miss Mabel B. Mitchell, assistant matron, 
Mrs. B. F. McFarland, assistant matron, . 
Mrs. Edith Howard, assistant matron, 
Miss Sarah E. Goss, assistant matron, 
Miss Lizzie J. Parkhurst, assistant matron, 
Miss Mary E. Greeley, assistant matron, . 
Miss Jennie E. Perry, assistant matron, . 
James W. Clark, engineer, .... 
William H. Powers, carpenter, $1.50 per day. 
John H. Cummings, truant officer, . 
John T. Perkins, steward, .... 

Harlan M. Thompson, watchman, 
Benjamin F. McFarland, farmer, 



hou 



SI 



,800 00 


400 00 


600 00 


700 00 


800 00 


800 00 


800 00 


700 00 


600 00 


800 00 


200 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


250 00 


400 00 


600 00 


250 00 


300 00 


250 00 


250 00 


200 00 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


900 00 


500 00 


400 00 


400 00 


350 00 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



85 






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u 












Theodore F. Chapin, 
Mrs. T. P. Chapin, 
Geo. F. Billiard, . 
Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Howe, 
Mr. and Mrs. I. T. Swift, 
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Keith, 
Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Jones, 
Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Perkins, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Howard, 
Mr. and Mrs. Alliston Green 
Mr. and Mrs. Quincy Norton 
Mr. and Mrs. H. I. Skillings, 
F. E. Corey, M.D., 
Miss Carrie Dana, . 
Miss Emma F. Newton, 
Miss Eliza M. Taylor, . 
Miss Annie J. Blanchard, 
Miss Nellie J. Wentworth, 
Miss Lena Rumery, 
Miss Kate Coney, . 
Miss Mary E. Penniman, 
Miss Carrie Perry, 
Miss Evelyn Northrop, . 
Miss Jennie E. Nye, 



86 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



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Miss May Martin, . 
Miss Anna L. Wilcox, 
M. Everett Howard, 
Miss Fannie S. Mitchell 
Mrs. Geo. F. Bullard, 
Miss Mary Custer, 
Miss Mabel B. Mitchell, 
Miss Mae E. Hartford, 
Mrs. B. F. McFarland, 
Mrs. Edith Howard, 
Miss Sarah E. Goss, 
Miss Lizzie J. Parkhurs 
Miss Mary E. Greeley, 
Miss Frances C. Ela, 
Miss Inez E. Howard, 
James W. Clark, . 
Wm. H. Powers, . 
John H. Cummings, 
John T. Perkins, . 
Harlan M. Thompson, 
B. F. McFarland, . 
Chas. E. Spooner, . 
Miss" Mary F. Wilcox, 
Mrs. John T. Perkins, 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18 



87 



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I MM MARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Schedule of Persons temporarily employed at the Lyman School for 
Boys within the Year ending Sept. 30, 1801, not found on Pay 
Boll. 



Chaplains, 




$50 00 


G. T. Fayerweather, 


Appraiser, . 


40 00 


G. P. Heath, 


Appraiser, . 


15 00 


I. II. Riley, M.D, . 


Surgical operation, . 


10 00 


C. B. Frost & Co., . 


Setting range, . 


3 10 


Wm. Allen & Sons, .... 


Boiler repairs, . 


3 00 




$121 10 



SUPERINTEE DENTS. 



Date of 
Appointment. 


NAMES. 


Date of 
Retirement. 




1848, 


William R. Lincoln, . 






1853. 




1853, 


James M. Talcott, . ' * 






1857. 




1857, 


William E. Starr, 








1861. 




1861, 


Joseph A. Allen, . 








1867. 




1867, 


Orville K. Hutchinson, 




. 




1868. 




1868, 


Benjamin Evans, . 






May, 


1873. 


May, 


1873, 


Allen G. Shepherd, 






Aug., 


1878. 


Aug., 


1878, 


Luther H. Sheldon, 


'. 




Dec, 


1880. 


Dec, 


1880, 


Edmund T. Dooley, 






Oct., 


1881. 


Oct., 


1881, 


Joseph A. Allen, . 






April, 


1885. 


July, 


1885, 


Henry E. Swan, . 






July, 


1888. 


July, 


1888, 


Theodore F. Chapin, . 






Still in 


office. 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



89 



TRUSTEES. 



Names, Residences, Commissions and Retirement of the Trustees 
of the State Reform School, from the Commencement to the 
Present Time. 



Date of 






Date of 


Commission. 


NAMES. 


Eesidence. 


Retirement. 


1847, 


Nahum Fisher,* . 


W r estborough, . 


1849 


1847, 


John W. Graves, 




Lowell, . 


1849 


1847, 


Samuel Williston, 




Easthampton, . 


1853 


1847, 


Thomas A. Green,* 




New Bedford, . 


1860 


1847, 


Otis Adams,* 




Grafton, . 


1851 


1847, 


George Denney,* 




Westborough, . 


1851 


1847, 


William P. Andrews,* 


Boston, . 


1851 


1849, 


William Livingston,* 


| Lowell, . 


1851 


1849, 


Russell A. Gibbs,* 


Lanesborough, 


1853 


1851, 


George H. Kuhn, 




Boston, . 


1855 


1851, 


J. B. French,* 




Lowell, 


1854 


1851, 


Daniel H. Forbes, 




Westborough, . 


1854 


1851, 


Edward B. Bigelow,* 




Grafton, . 


1855 


1853, 


J. W. H. Page,* . 




New Bedford, . 


1856 


1853, 


Harvey Dodge, . 




Sutton, . ' . 


1867 


1854, 


G. Howland Shaw,* 




Boston, . 


1856 


1854, 


Henry W. Cashman,* 




Bernardston, . 


1860 


1855, 


Albert H. Nelson,* 




Woburn, . 


1855 


1855, 


Joseph A. Fitch, 




Hopkinton, 


1858 


1855, 


Parley Hammond, 




Worcester, 


1860 


1856, 


Simon Brown, . 




Concord, . 


1860 


1856, 


John A. Fayerweathei 


5 


Westborough, . 


1859 


1857, 


Josiah H. Temple, 




Framingham, . 


1860 


1858, 


Judson S. Brown, 




Fitchburg, 


1860 


1859, 


Theodore Lyman, 




Brooklinc, 


1860 


1860, 


George C. Davis,* 




Northborough, 


1873 


1860, 


Carver Hotchkiss, 




Shelburne, 


1863 


1860, 


Julius A. Palmer, 




Boston, 


1862 


1860, 


Henry Chickering, 




Pittsfield, . 


1869 


1860, 


George W. Bentley, 




Worcester, 


1861 


1860, 


Alden Leland, . 




Holliston, 


1864 


1861, 


Pliny Nickerson, 




Boston, . 


1868 


1861, 


Samuel G. Howe,* 




Boston, 


1863 


1862, 


Benjamin Boynton,* 




Westborough, . 


1864 


1863, 


J. H. Stephenson, 




Boston, 


1866 


1863, 


John Ayres, 




Charlestown, . 


1867 



* Deceased. 



90 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct.'91, 



Names, Residences, etc., of Trustees — Concluded. 



Date of 






Date of 


Commission. 


NAMES. 


Residence. 


Retirement. 


1864, 


A. E. Goodnow, . 


Worcester, 


1874 


1864, 


Isaac Ames, 




Haverhill, 


1865 


1865, 


Jones S. Davis, . 




Holyoke, . 


1868 


1866, 


Joseph A. Pond,* 




Brighton, 


1867 


1867, 


Stephen G. Deblois, 




Boston, . 


1878 


1868, 


John Ayres, 




Medford, . 


1874 


1868, 


Harmon Hall, 




Saugus, . 
Bridgewater, . 


1871 


1868, 


L. L. Goodspeed, 




1872 


1869, 


E. A. Hubbard, . 




Springfield, 


1877 


1871, 


Lucius W. Pond, 




Worcester, 


1875 


1871, 


John W. Olmstead, 




Boston, 


1873 


1872, 


Moses H. Sargent, 




Newton, . 


1877 


1873, 


A. S. Wood worth, 




Boston, . 


1876 


1873, 


Edwin B. Harvey, 




Westborough, . 


1878 


1874, 


W. H. Baldwin, . 




Boston, 


1876 


1875, 


John L. Cummings, 




Ashburnham, . 


1879 


1876, 


Jackson B. Swett, 




Haverhill, 


1878 


1877, 


Samuel R. Heywood, 




Worcester, 


1879 


1877, 


Milo Hildreth, . 




Northborough, . 


1879 


1878, 


Lyman Belknap,* 




Westborough, . 


1879 


1878, 


Franklin Williams,* 




Boston, 


1879 


1878, 


Robert Couch, . 




Newbury port, . 


1879 


1879, 


John T. Clark, . 




Boston, . 


1879 


1879, • . 


M. J. Flatley, . 




Boston, . 


1881 


1879, 


Adelaide A. Calkins, 




Springfield, , . 


1880 


1879, 


Lyman Belknap, 




Westborough, . 


1884 


1879, 


Anne B. Richardson, 




Lowell, . 


1886 


1879, 


Milo Hildreth, . 




Northborough, . 


1891 


1879, 


George W. Johnson, 




Brookfield, 


1887 


1879, 


Samuel R. Heywood, 




Worcester, 


1888 


1880, 


Elizabeth C. Putnam, 




Boston, . 


Still in office. 


1881, 


Thomas D wight, 




Boston, 


1884 


1884, 


M.H.Walker, . 




Westborough, . 


Still in office. 


1884, 


J. J. O'Connor,* . 




Holyoke, . 


1889 


1886, 


Elizabeth G. Evans, 




Boston, . 


Still in office. 


1887, 


Chas L. Gardner, 




Palmer, . 


1891 


1888, 


H. C. Greeley, . 




Clinton, . 


Still in office. 


1889, 


M. J. Sullivan, . 




Chicopee, 


It IS 


1891, 


Samuel W. McDaniel, 


Cambridge, 


u a 


1891, 


C. P. Worcester, 


Boston, . 


a u 



* Deceased. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



State Industrial School for Girls, 



LANCASTER 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

The school work during the past year has varied little from 
previous years. The girls have had the same practical train- 
ing, besides the usual hours in the school-room. As their 
stay in the school is so short, their education must indeed 
be limited. 

As has been said, " What we know is not the best ques- 
tion, but what we can do with it, and, above all, what it has 
made of us." In view of this, the great question seems to 
be, What instruction shall be given the girls, which, con- 
sidering their average abilities, will be most available to 
them in the future? The experiences of those who have 
gone out from time to time have proven the value of their 
industrial training. 

Since so many inquiries have been made regarding the 
girls' dietary, it seems best that it be given in detail. 
While no fixed order of diet is followed, the statement sub- 
mitted will give, as nearly as possible, a week's dietary as 
usually carried out. A rigid order of diet is not adhered to, 
in fact, the exact reverse is aimed at. Although the stand- 
ard articles of food remain, of necessity, much the same, 
variety in serving does away with what there might be of 
monotony. To this end the housekeepers are instructed to 
so modify the dishes from day to day and week to week as 
to render them palatable in the greatest variety of forms. 
Each housekeeper, of course, has her different ways of do- 
ing this, but virtually the dietary for each house is the same. 

To illustrate : griddle cakes are served for the morning 
meal once a week, milk toast the same, each housekeeper 
suiting her judgment as to time, according to circumstances 
and convenience, usually utilizing these and similar dishes 



94 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

when there is nothing left over from the dinner of the day 
before. It will be noticed in the statement, that, as a rule, 
remnants of yesterday's dinner appear in the breakfast ; this 
meal, therefore, is not only economical, but one easily pre- 
pared. Waste is not tolerated. All pieces of stale bread 
are re-served in toasts, bread puddings, " brown betties," 
etc. ; remains of a meat or vegetable dinner in meat or vege- 
table hash. 

During the summer and harvesting months there are 
added all kinds of vegetables, garden sauce, and fruits in 
their season ; these are served in abundance. The quan- 
tities consumed are suprising, being more relishable at 
this season than meats. Recognizing this fact, during the 
hot months a vegetable dish supplants the usual meat roast 
of Wednesday's dinner ; baked peas, pea soup or onion stew, 
supplemented with sweet corn, cucumbers and other vege- 
tables, with a simple dessert of pumpkin pie or apple dump- 
ling. During the early apple season sauce is served every 
night for supper, and throughout the year once or twice 
a week. Tomatoes are likewise abundantly used. In the 
months when eggs are plentiful they are frequently served, 
sometimes in place of Friday's fish. The latter, when used 
("salt fish"), is served in various ways, — broiled, with 
milk gravy, fish chowder, fish hash, fish balls, etc. Corn 
bread or "johnny-cake " is supposed to form a part of nearly 
every dinner. Fresh, rich milk is provided the entire year, 
and as much of it as is wished. 

Sunday. 

Breakfast. 

Warm brownbread or biscuit, butter, coffee. 

Dinner. 
Baked beans, brownbread, wheat bread, pickles, pie or pudding. 

Supper. 
Rice or crackers and milk. 

Monday. 
Breakfast. 

Mush and molasses, bread, cocoa or milk. 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 95 



Dinner. 

Vegetable hash or cold corned beef, from Saturday's dinner, potatoes, 
vegetables, corn cake. 

Supper. 
Bread, milk, gingerbread. 

Tuesday. 

Breakfast. 
Beans from Sunday's dinner, bread, cocoa or milk. 

Dinner. 

Fresh fish, baked with dressing or broiled with gravy, potatoes, corn 
cake, pickles, wheat oread. 

Supper. 
Bread, milk, bread pudding. 

Wednesday. 

Breakfast. 
Oatmeal, molasses, bread, cocoa or milk. 

Dinner. 
Roast meat, potatoes, tomatoes, gravy, johnny-cake, wheat bread. 

Supper. 
Bread, milk, sauce. 

Thursday. 

Breakfast. 
Griddle cakes and molasses, bread, cocoa or milk. 

Dinner. 
Beef stew, vegetables, bread, " brown betty." 

Slipper. 
Bread, milk, doughnuts or gingerbread. 

Friday . 

Breakfast. 
Soup from Thursday's dinner, mush, bread, cocoa or milk. 



96 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 

Dinner. 

Potatoes, salt fish, milk gravy, or pork scraps and fish balls, tomatoes or 
pickles, corn cake. 

Supper. 
Milk toast, bread, milk, sauce. 

Saturday. 

Breakfast. 
Fish hash, bread, cocoa or milk. 

Dinner. 
Corned beef, potatoes, vegetables of all kinds, brownbread. 

Supper. 
Bread, molasses, milk. 

Respectfully submitted, 



L. L. BRACKETT, 

Superintendent. 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



97 



STATISTICS. 



During the year there have been in the school for more or less 

time, 179 

In the school Sept. 30, 1890, 97 

Returned to the school, having been placed out in 

former years, . . .36 

New commitments, ........ 46 

Total — 179 



The following disposition was made of these girls : — 

30, 1891, . 



In the school Sept 

In places, 

With friends, 

Married, 

Home for Feeble-minded, 
Reformatory Prison, .... 
Discharged, ..... 

Died, 

Ran away from place, not recovered, 

At work elsewhere, . 

Temporary home, .... 

Of age, 

Total, 



There have been placed out during the year, 
There have been returned, 

For serious immorality, . 
unsatisfactory conduct, 
change of place, 
illness, 
larceny, 
homesickness, 
rest, .... 
drunkenness, 
Returned from elopement, 
Returned from hospital, . 
Total returned to the school, 



91 
56 
12 
2 
2 
5 
1 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 



16 
14 
11 

7 
1 
2 
8 
1 
4 
2 



179 

119 
66 



66 



* Of the 119 placed out, there have been placed once, . 
" " twice, . 
" *' tbree times, 
Whole number of placings out, 



102 
16 
1 
— 137 



98 



PKIMARY AND EEFOKM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Total in custody, Sept. 30, 1890, 

Committed this year, ....... 

Total in custody during the year, .... 

Of whom there have attained their majority, . 
Discharged by vote of trustees, ..... 
Died, 

Total who have come of age, been discharged or died, 



Temporary home, ..... 
At work in families, ..... 
At work elsewhere, ..... 
On probation with friends, 
Married in former years, not yet twenty-one, 
Married this year, not yet twenty-one, 
Total self-supporting, 



In the school Sept. 30, 1891, .... 

In other institutions, ...... 

Transferred to Reformatory Prison in former year 
Transferred to Reformatory Prison this year, 
Total still supported by the Stale, . 



Ran away from place in former years, not recovered, 
Ran away from place this year, not recovered, 



273 
46 
— 319 



28 
13 

4 

— 45 

1 
96 

1 
26 
23 
13 

— 160 

91 
1 
3 
5 

— 100 

4 
10 

— 14 



Total still in care of trustees, 



319 



Of those committed this year, — 



27 could read and write. 
11 could read and not write. 



8 could neither read nor write. 



Orphans, .... 


5 


Both parents living, 


26 


One parent living, 


14 


Adopted, 


1 


29 born in Massachusetts. 




2 born in New York. 




3 born in Canada. 




1 born in Virginia. 




3 born in Nova Scotia. 




1 born in England. 




2 born in Vermont. 




1 born in Ireland. 




1 born in Maine. 




3 unknown. 





7 American parentage. 
5 colored American parentage. 
15 Irish parentage. 
7 French parentage. 



3 English parentage. 
5 Scotch parentage. 
2 German parentage. 
2 unknown. 



1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



99 



Stubbornness, 
Lewdness, . 
Larceny, 
Night-walking, 
Vagrancy, . 
Injuring a building, 



26 
4 
7 
2 
3 
1 



Receiving stolen goods, . 1 
Obtaining goods under false 

pretence, .... 1 

Leading idle and vicious life, 1 

Committed by parents, . 26 

Committed by officer, . . 20 



Of those in the school Sept. 30, 1891 



4 are 13 years of age. 
10 are 14 years of age. 
18 are 15 years of age. 
30 are 16 years of age. 
15 are 17 years of age. 



8 are 18 years of age. 
5 are 19 years of age. 
1 is 20 years of age. 
Average age, 16 years. 



Current expenses, $20,689 03 

Cash received and paid to State treasury, . 429 00 



$20,260 03 



Average number of inmates, 89.01. Dividing current ex- 
penses by average number of inmates gives annual 
cost of 

Weekly cost per capita, 



$227 61 
4 38 



INVENTORY OF PROPERTY. 



Real Estate. 

Chapel, $3,000 00 

House No. 1, 8,250 00 

No. 2, . 8,500 00 

No. 4, 9,000 00 

No. 5, 4,900 00 

Superintendent's house, 3,200 00 

Store-room, 300 00 

Farm-house and barn, 1,500 00 

Large barn, . . . . . . . . 7,275 00 

Silo, 400 00 

Store-house, 450 00 

Old barn, 150 00 

Wood-house, 125 00 

Ice-house, 100 00 

Store-house No. 3, 25 00 

Carried forward, 



$47,175 00 



100 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Brought forward, 

Piggery, . 

Reservoir house ]STo. 1. 
Reservoir house, land, etc 
Hen-house, 
Carriage shed, . 
Farm, 176 acres, 
Wood lot, 10 acres, 
Storm windows, 



No 



$47,175 00 


100 00 


100 00 


300 00 


150 00 


150 00 


7,500 00 


200 00 


48 00 



$55,723 00 



Personal Property. 



Property in No. 1, . 








$1,259 00 


No. 2, . 








1,296 76 


No. 4, . 








1,570 50 


No. 5, . 








980 77 


Superintendent's house, . 








995 00 


Chapel and library, .... 








650 00 


Provisions and groceries, 








567 47 


Dry goods (clothing and shoes) , 








639 85 


Crockery and hardware, 








118 41 


Paint, 








12 50 


Medicine, 








9 00 


Stationery, .... 








11 25 


School supplies, 








46 25 


Fuel, .... 








1,290 00 


Valuation of live stock, . 








1,863 00 


Valuation of horses, 








600 00 


Tools and carriages, 








1,897 00 


Produce of farm on hand, 








4,642 81 


118,449 57 


A. J. BANCROFT, 


H. F. HOSMER, 






Appraisers. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 
Worcester, ss. Lancaster, Oct. 7, 1891. 

Then personally appeared the above-named appraisers, and made oath that the 
statements hereinbefore subscribed by them are true, and that they have performed 
to the best of their ability the duties of appraisers. 

Before me, 

CHAS. G. BANCROFT, 

Justice of the Peace. 



1891. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



101 



FAKMEK'S KEPOBT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

I herewith submit to you the farm account, also the finan- 
cial statement of the State Industrial School for Girls, for 
the year ending Sept. 30, 1891. 

Respectfully submitted, 

N. C. BRACKETT, 

Farmer and Steward. 



Summary of Farm Account. 
Dr. 



To live stock, as per inventory, 
To horses, as per inventory, . 



. $1,863 00 
600 00 
To tools and carriages, 1,897 00 



Net gain during the year, 



$4,360 00 
14 00 



Dr. 



To labor, . 
grain, . 

blacksmithing, 
pasturing, . 
manure, 
ice, 

salt, . 

sawing lumber, 
plough points, 
shoeing oxen, 
oxen, 
cows, . 
phosphate, . 
barbed wire, 
grass seed, . 
beans, . 

seeds and plants 
farm tools, . 
repairing mowing machine, 



$1,388 86 

1,563 57 

66 68 

36 25 

89 87 

21 00 

5 00 

9 75 

1 80 

2 25 
135 00 

73 00 

41 75 

14 30 

5 55 

3 25 
9 40 
7 00 

10 00 



$3,484 28 



102 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Or. 

B}- farm products of 1891, as per inventory, . . $4,642 81 

By farm products of 1890, as per inventory, . . 4,015 63 

Net gain during the year, . . . 



$627 18 



Milk, $1,417 90 

Pork, 327 65 

Beef, 426 91 

Chickens, 74 42 

Eggs, 186 01 

Bedding, 161 40 

Lumber, 140 00 

Hungarian, 93 10 

Soap, 131 20 

Asparagus, 10 00 

Beet greens, 10 00 

Pease, 29 50 

Beans, 17 50 

Strawberries, 53 12 

Currants, 5 00 

Melons, 55 00 

Cabbage, 10 00 

Turnips, 4 75 

Sweet corn, . . 125 00 

Cucumbers, 28 00 

Tomatoes, 22 50 

Squash, 15 00 

Pears, 25 00 

Apples, . . 50 00 

Onions, 5 00 

Hay . 13 00 

Calves, 10 00 

Service of animal, 2 00 

Keeping horses for use of school, .... 150 00 

Ice 100 00 

Produce sold, 18 00 

Income of farm, . 217 00 

$3,873 96 

Net gain on farm account, $389 68 

Net gain on farm products, as per inventory, . 627 18 

Net gain on live stock, as per inventory, . . 14 00 

Total net gain, $1,030 86 

Improvements on buildings, independent of special appropriations : — 

Superintendent's house, $200 00 

Barn shed, 125 00 

Total, $325 00 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 


103 


Produce sold and Receipts 


sent to State Treasurer. 


Calves, .... 


$222 50 


Labor, .... 


$5 00 


Pigs and shoats, . 


92 00 


Hay, .... 


19 50 


Board, .... 


80 00 








Service of animal, 


8 00 




$429 00 


Apples, 


2 00 








Produce Consumed. 




Milk, 38,648 quarts, 


$1,417 90 


Tomatoes, 45 bushels, . 


$22 50 


Beef, 5,901 pounds, 


426 91 


Apples, 100 bushels, 


50 00 


Pork, 5,005 pounds, 


327 65 


Squash, \ ton, 


15 00 


Eggs, 793 dozen, . 


186 01 


Sweet corn, 2 acres, 


125 00 


Bedding, 26 tons, 1,800 




Hungarian, 3 tons, 620 




pounds, 


161 40 


pounds, 


33 10 


Chickens, 467| pounds, 


74 42 


Beet greens, \ ton, 


10 00 


Soap, 41 barrels, . 


131 20 


Cabbages, 125 heads, . 


10 00 


Watermelons, 500, 


50 00 


Turnips, 19 bushels, 


4 75 


Musk melons, 50, 


5 00 


Ice, .... 


100 00 


Strawberries, 425 quarts, 


53 12 


Onions, 5 bushels, 


5 00 


Currants, 50 quarts, 


5 00 


Ha} T , 2 tons, . 


32 00 


Pease, 29| bushels, 


29 50 


Potatoes, 50 bushels, 


25 00 


Beans, 17| bushels, 
Pears, 25 bushels, 


17 50 
25 00 








$3,360 96 


Cucumbers, 5Q bushels, 


28 00 






Produce on ID 


lnd Oct. 1, 1891. 




Apples, winter, 25 bar- 




Lumber, 4 M , soft, 


$60 00 


rels, .... 


$31 25 


Mangolds, 52 tons, 


624 00 


Apples, cider, 25 bar- 




Manure, 60 cords, 


360 00 


rels, .... 


6 25 


Oat, fodder, 32 tons, 




Beans, white, 25 bushels, 


62 00 


1,279 pounds, . 


489 59 


Beans, horticultural, 6 




Onions, 60 bushels, 


48 00 


bushels, 


18 00 


Pumpkins, 2,500 pounds, 


12 50 


Beans, butter, 1 bushel, 


3 00 


Pease, 7 bushels, . 


17 50 


Beets, table, 160 bushels, 


80 00 


Pickles, salted, 5 barrels, 


20 00 


Celery, heads, 200, 


10 00 


Parsnips, 3 bushels, 


1 50 


Cabbage, heads, 597, . 


41 79 


Potatoes, 809 bushels, .. 


404 50 


Carrots, 30 bushels, 


15 00 


Potatoes, small, 230 




Corn, 150 bushels ears, . 


57 75 


bushels, 


57 50 


Corn, seed, 10 bushels 




Rowen, 10 tons, 125 




ears, .... 


8 00 


pounds, 


120 75 


Corn, pop, 6 bushels 




Ruta-bagas, 75 bushels, 


34 50 


ears, .... 


6 00 


Squash, 5 tons, 


100 CO 


Ensilage, 110 tons, 


550 00 


Tomatoes, 37 bushels, . 


18 50 


English hay, 57 tons, 




Vinegar, 800 gallons, . 


• 160 00 


804 pounds, 


918 43 


Watermelons, 125, 


12 50 


English hay, old, 20 
tons, .... 








240 00 




$4,642 81 


Lumber, 3 M., hard, 


54 00 







104 PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 





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106 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



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1891.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



107 



Pay-roll of Persons employed at the State Industrial School for the 
Year ending Sept. 30, 1891. 









Com- 


NAMES. 


Nature of Service. 


Time. 


pensation. 


L. L. Brackett, 


Superintendent, . 


1 year, 


$999 96 


N. C. Brackett, 




Farmer and Steward, . 


1 " ... 


650 04 


C. J. Bean, . 




Matron, 


11 months 14 days, . 


334 15 


M. R. Eames, 












326 08 


G. R. Greene, 










6 months, 


174 96 


L. D. Mayhew, 










2 " 11 days, . 


68 86 


S. E. Stowe, . 










8 " 6 " . 


267 73 


R. L. Brown, 










5 " . 7 " . 


152 50 


A. J. Wheeler, 




Sub Matron, 




'5 days, . 


4 79 


E. B. Eames, 




a <( 




2 months 12 days, . 


69 81 


F. L. French, 




<« << 




1 " . 


29 16 


I. N. Bailey, . 




<< << 




1 " 


29 16 


H. A. Woodward, 




(i it 




20 days, . 


19 16 


H. A. Woodward, 




Vacancy officer, 




4 months 45 days, . 


150 35 


F. L. French, 




«< >< 




1 " . 


25 00 


A. L. Brackett, 




<< a 




1 " 93 days, . 


101 42 


L. B. Barton, 




Teacher, 




9 " 20 " . 


241 42 


M. K. Verrill, 




« 






6 " . 


150 00 


C. M. Nickerson, 




" 






11 " 16 days, . 


288 13 


A. E. Smith, . 




" 






8 « 22 » . 


208 22 


A. M. Furnel. 




" 






3 « 25 (< . 


95 53 


M. M. Holden, 




»< 






2 " 19 " . 


65 60 


J. L. Estabrooke, 




a 






2 » 3 " . 


52 46 


F. A. Strong, 




" 






1 " . 


25 00 


M. J. Strong, 




K 






2 " . 


50 00 


F. L. French, 




" 






1 <{ . 


25 00 


A. M. Fellows, 




(< 






2 » 21 days, . 


67 24 


B. E. Clark, . 




It 






25 days, . 


20 52 


M. Torry, 




Housekeeper, 




1 year, 


300 00 


K. E. Saunders, 




" 




9 months 21 days, . 


241 42 


M. J. Mclntire, 




" 




17 days, . 


13 94 


I. E. Brown, . 




a 




9 months 26 days, . 


246 37 


E. A. Edwards, 




a 




6 " 8 " . 


156 56 


E. Elden, 




n 




1 " 8 " . 


31 56 


R. M. Chabot, 




" 




23 days, . 


18 88 


A. J. Wheeler, 




" 




9 " 


7 39 


H. M. Oaks, . 




" 




3 months, 


75 00 


F. L. French, 




" 




3 " 18 days, . 


89 78 


F. C. Pearson, 




" 




1 " 38 » . 


56 22 


I. N. Bailey, . 




" 




3 " 17 " . 


88 96 


H. S. Hale, . 




(< 




2 " 19 » . 


66 42 


A. M. Collins, 




" 




3 " 8 ■" . 


81 57 


E. H. Knowlton, 




" 




1 " 29 » . 


48 80 


M. V. O'Callaghar 


, 


Physician, . 




1 year, 


200 04 


N. T. Greene, 




Foreman, 






9 months, 


405 00 


0. V. Edwards, 




Laborer, 






6 " 8 days, . 


162 83 


A. E. Brown, 




a 






1 year, 


312 00 


J. W. Chandler, 




" 






1 month 14 days, . 


55 78 


0. G. Mclntire, 




" 






2 « 9 « . 


87 07 


James Brodrick, 




(< 






11 " 13 « . 


411 95 


N. 0. Mclntire, 




" 






5 days, . 


4 27 


G. W. Kendall, 




<( 






5 months 24 days, . 


203 03 


H. W. Saunders, 




«< 






3 " 24 « . 


133 26 


E. W. Lawrence, 




" 






5 " 7 i( . 


181 51 


M. A. Perry, . 




«< 






11 weeks, . 


48 00 


Henry Carr, . 




(< 






1 month 11 days, . 


47 65 


G. E. Nickerson, 




Foreman, 






1 » 1 " . 


46 23 


Rev. D. B. Scott, 




Clergyman, 






.... 


65 00 


Rev. Arthur Crane, 


<< 








5 00 


Rev. James Mudge, 


<< 






. 


15 00 


Rev. G. S. Ward, . 


<( 









10 00 



108 



PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. [Oct. 



Pay-roll of Persons employed — Concluded. 



NAMES. 



Nature of Service. 



Time. 



Com- 
pensation. 



Rev. H. K. Pervear, 
Rev. Seelye Bryant, 
Rev. J. C. Duncan, 
Rev. G. M. Bartol, 
Rev. W. B. Toleman, 
Rev. T. L. Fisher, . 
Mrs. S. S. Fessenden, 
S. L. Brown, . 
Geo. L. Tobey, M.D., 
G. R. Greene, 
H. T. Spaulding, . 
W. E. Berry, 
A. M. Holrnan, 



Clergyman, 



Chapel entertainment, 
Professional services, 
Laborer, 
Farm-house matron, 



20 00 
20 00 
25 00 

15 00 
5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

6 80 
34 25 
20 03 

5 00 

16 75 
5 00 

$8,796 57 



1891.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 109 



PHYSICIAN'S KEPOBT. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Lancaster Industrial School. 

I have the honor of submitting my seventh annual report, 
for the year ending Sept. 30, 1891. 

During the year we have transferred three of our girls 
to the custodial ward of the Waltham School for Feeble- 
minded, and we have at least one other who, like those 
three already sent, is physically strong, but too weak morally 
to be safely placed out at service. 

Two girls suffering from severe specific trouble have been 
sent to Tewksbury, because we have not the facilities for 
complete isolation. 

Two of our girls have been returned to us in pregnant 
condition. Both have been placed under care of the courts. 

Willing girls about the age of puberty are apt to be over- 
worked by exacting housekeepers ; and this year we have 
had an unusual number obliged to return to "build up." 
A few weeks of rest, coupled with a course of tonic medi- 
cine, have been sufficient to restore all to health with one 
exception. A little mulatto girl, in her fourteenth year, 
developed acute tuberculosis, which ended fatally in one of 
the Boston hospitals, where she was placed for treatment. 

At present the health of our girls is excellent. 

Respectfully, 
MARY V. O'CALLAGHAN, M.D. 

Worcester, Oct. 1, 1891. 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT .... .... No. 18. 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



THE TRUSTEES 



State Primary and Reform Schools, 



WITH THE 



ANNUAL REPORTS OF THE RESIDENT OFFICERS, 



For the Year ending Sept. 30, 1892 



BOSTON : 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 

1893. 



CONTENTS 



Trustees 1 Report on State Primary School, 

Trustees' Report on Lyman School, .... 

Trustees' Report on State Industrial School, 

Report of Treasurer of Trust Funds, 

Report of Superintendent of State Primary School, 

Statistics of State Primary School, .... 

Report of Physician of State Primary School, . 

Report of Principal of Schools of State Primary School 

Report of Superintendent of Lyman School, . 

Statistics of Lyman School, 

Report of Principal of Schools of Lyman School, . 

Report of Instructor of Gymnastics, Lyman School, 

Report of Physician, Lyman School, 

Treasurer's Report, Lyman School, .... 

Report of Superintendent of State Industrial School, 

Statistics of State Industrial School, 

Report of Physician of State Industrial School, 



PAGE 

5 

11 
19 
29 
35 
40 
52 
55 
61. 
65 
73 
75 
77 
79 
99 
101 
112 



Commnnforaltjj ai lllassairjjwsetts. 



TRUSTEES' REPORT. 



STATE PRIMARY AND REFORM SCHOOLS. 

To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools 
respectfully present their fourteenth annual report of the 
three institutions committed to their care. 

The State Primary School at Monson. 

On a hillside overlooking the town of Palmer stands a 
collection of large white buildings, formerly a State alms- 
house, but now the State Primary School. Here lives a 
great family of children, numbering about three hundred, 
together with about fifty attendants and officers who care for 
them. These children are the neglected and dependent 
boys and girls who have become the charges of the State, 
and also such little ones as have been led into misdemeanors, 
usually, as it proves, because of lack of proper care, and 
who are technically classed as juvenile offenders. 

The great effort of the trustees has been for years to 
reduce the numbers in this school by placing out the chil- 
dren individually in such families throughout the State as 
could be found willing to take good care of them, and by 
boarding out the youngest and least capable children who 
could not hope to find a ready welcome in families as helpers 
about the house and farm. The importance of placing the 
children in good homes, where they may grow up under 



6 TKUSTEES' REPORT PRIMARY SCHOOL. [Oct. 

more natural conditions and under paternal and maternal 
care, has been urged many times in our reports. The 
statistics of the school this year show a very satisfactory 
progress in this direction. During the past year the work 
of placing out has gone on as never before, thanks to the 
successful efforts of the new agent of the State Board of 
Lunacy and Charity who has been especially appointed to 
this work. Although the number of arrivals at the school 
has been much the largest ever recorded in a single year, 
yet the number placed out has more than kept pace with it, 
so that the final population at the close of this season is 
smaller than has been recorded for many years. For years 
the average population of the school has been steadily de- 
creasing, and it is gratifying to note that the last year forms 
no exception in this movement, notwithstanding the extraor- 
dinary number of arrivals. 

A glance at the accompanying diagram will show the 
progress of the work of placing the children in free homes 
and at board for the past eleven years : — 

Ratio {in Percentage) of Number placed out to the Average 

Population. 



/o 

140 

130 

l£0 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 

60 

50 

4-0 

30 

20 

10 

O 



1882 


1883 


1884 


1885 


1886 


1887 


1888 


1889 


1890 


1891 


1892 






















/ 






















/ 






















/ 






















/ 





















































































































































































































































1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 7 

Thus it will be seen that in 1892 one hundred and forty- 
two per cent, of the average population has been placed 
out. That is to say, nearly half again as many children as 
are to be found at the school have gone out to homes during 
the past year. In actual numbers the average population 
this last year has been 293, the first time that the average 
has fallen below 300. But the population of the school 
cannot go on diminishing indefinitely, for many of our 
children need the shelter of an institution, as for instance, 
new arrivals waiting to be fitted into the right places, others 
who are so lawless that a short period of taming is neces- 
sary to make them acceptable in a private household, others 
who have been returned from places as unsatisfactory, — 
there are now over 50 of these in the school who are too old 
to be boarded and who have been returned, perhaps several 
times, from places. In addition there is always a very con- 
siderable number who are physically or mentally incapable. 
It seems probable that when every available child has been 
placed out, there must still be provision at this institution 
for about 200. 

With the increased number of children placed out goes 
the necessity of increased activity in visiting them from time 
to time in their new homes. The difficulties and little dis- 
agreements that may arise between the child and his foster 
parents or employers may often be adjusted by a friendly 
visit, and careful supervision is needed to ensure the rights 
and interests of the children. We feel that the visiting has 
hardly kept pace with the placing during the last year. We 
understand, however, that arrangements are now being made 
to supply this deficiency. 

In May Mr. Amos Andrews declined reappointment as 
superintendent of the school, and Mr. Walter A. Wheeler 
of Rutland was appointed his successor, and entered on his 
duties August 1. 

The health of the school has this year on the whole been 
good. The only illness which caused us much anxiety was 
diphtheria, which appeared in four cases, only one of which 
proved very severe. The occurrence of these cases led to a 
careful investigation, and to the removal of whatever un- 
hygienic conditions could be discovered. We feel con- 



8 TRUSTEES' REPORT PRIMARY SCHOOL. [Oct. 

fident now that the sewerage service of the school is 
sound. 

A complete system of iron fire-escape galleries has been 
put on the buildings, in accordance with the advice of the 
inspector of buildings. A generous appropriation of $2,000 
was made for the purpose by the Legislature. We feel now 
that the old buildings are as healthful and safe as we can 
make them. 

During the past year several cases of tuberculosis were 
discovered among the seventy cows belonging to the insti- 
tution. In consequence, we had a careful examination of 
the herd made by Dr. Austin Peters of Jamaica Plain. 
Among other things, Dr. Peters strongly urged the neces- 
sity of improving the sanitary condition of the cattle barn. 
We were considering how best to act on his suggestions, 
when news arrived that the barn had been totally destroyed 
by fire. The Legislature promptly placed in our hands an 
appropriation of $10,000 with which to rebuild. After 
consulting expert dairymen, examining the best patterns 
and considering our special needs at the school, our archi- 
tects, Messrs. Richards & Richards, prepared plans for a 
model barn ; but, since no bids on their specifications came 
within our appropriation, we were obliged to ask for an 
additional appropriation of $1,500, which was granted. 
The barn is now practically finished. It consists of a main 
building with a long wing joining at one corner at a right 
angle. The main building is chiefly for hay and grain 
storage, but it includes silos, calf pens and a milk room. 
The wing is a light, airy room, to be used exclusively for 
the cows. A broad passage extends down the centre, and 
on either side stands a row of cows facing inward. The 
feed is delivered in front of the cattle from a suspended 
trough running on a trolley. Running water at the required 
temperature is supplied by an asphalt trough in front of 
every cow. Although its cost is somewhat greater 
than that of an old-fashioned barn of similar capacity, 
we believe that nothing has been put in which will not 
directly contribute to the health and cleanliness of the stock 
and to the reasonable convenience of caring for it. The 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 9 

new barn is the first of the model buildings which we 
hope in time will have entirely supplanted the old alms- 
house settlement. 

In our last report we spoke of the advantage it would be 
to the school to replace the old buildings by a number of 
small, homelike houses, or, in a word, to substitute the 
family system for the congregate system. We are now no 
less confident that in time the family system should super- 
sede the present arrangement ; but with a new superin- 
tendent in charge, it seems wise to defer the work of 
remodelling for the present. 

In the mean time the superintendent is making the 
school a more healthful and natural home for the children. 
It is his aim to treat the children more as individuals ; 
to establish personal relations with each. He takes an 
interest in each one, and it is evident that each and every 
one takes a personal interest in him. He is trying to 
develop their individuality in many small ways. -It is his 
plan to encourage every child to keep a little cupboard 
stocked with its own personal treasures, — such possessions 
as make a boy hold his head up as a property owner among 
his fellows, and which form the basis of business as well as 
friendly relations among them. The boys are to be pro- 
vided with some variety of clothing of good quality, and 
will thus be made to appear and feel more like other 
children. 

Although the total number of inmates during the year 
has been 744, and the average number 293, there are at 
present at its close but 271, the smallest number ever on 
record; of these, 206 are boys, 51 girls, and 14 pauper 
mothers, who in order not to break the family tie are ad- 
mitted to the institution with their children. On page 40 
will be found a table giving admissions to and departures from 
the school. But besides these in the school there are about 
1,150 more children who have been sent out to homes and 
are still charges of the State under its 'Board of Lunacy 
and Charity. Of this great number 275 are at board, and 
approximately 875 are in free homes. All of those now at 
board and a large number of those in free homes w^ould be 



10 TRUSTEES' REPORT PRIMARY SCHOOL. [Oct. 

in the school to-day but for the placing-out policy both of 
the State Board and of the trustees of the school.* 

The cost of boarding out is $1.50 a week and clothing. 
The total appropriation for this purpose last year was 
$29,000 ($20,000 to the State Board of Lunacy and Charity 
and $9,000 to the trustees; a small balance of the latter 
sum will be unspent and will be turned back into the 
treasury). The appropriation for the institution was 
$51,000, as against $52,000 last year. The per capita cost, 
however, rose this year to $3.58, — an increase of 56 cents, 
due chiefly to the smaller number among whom the gross 
expense was divided. 

* In 1866 there were over 800 children in the three State almshouses ; in 1867 over 
700 ; in 1869 nearly 500 ; and in 1892 there are only 257. 

When in 1882 the experiment of boarding out was inaugurated, it was feared that, 
as the expense of the school does not diminish in proportion to diminished numbers, 
money paid tor board outside would prove an actual outlay for which there would 
be no adequate return, as at the age of ten, when board should cease, the children 
would come back in great numbers to the State Primary School, helpless to earn 
their own way for several years. 

On the contrary it has been found that of over 200 boarded children who have 
reached the age of ten while at board, only 13 have returned to the institution, while 
19 have been discharged to their own people and 168 have found free homes with 
their foster parents or others. 

Several of those now with their foster parents had been removed to other places, 
but had returned of their own free will and were working for wages or as a child of 
the family. One, a child who had run away and been very troublesome, returned to 
his foster parents, and is, since the death of the father of the family, " most helpful, 
— a man about the house." Several of the girls are being educated, one in an 
academy, like daughters of the house. 

Among the records of children still at board we find: "untidy, disobedient, im- 
proving;" " well, happy and mischievous;" "called a sunbeam;" "a favorite at 
home and at school;" "mischievous and happy;" "grows fast, — always well;" 
"neat, well clothed, bright and happy ; " "never wants to leave his home, — is try- 
ing to be a good boy ; " " excellent home, — boy full of life and mischief; " " limbs 
in bad shape, but bright, active and contented ; " " hard to manage, but improving ; " 
"colored, — well cared for and attractive;" "looks perfectly well, — a pet in the 
family;" "large, tall, tries to help;" "well cared for, and fond of 'mama;'" 
"nicely dressed and trained." 

Schooling is secured for these children as a matter of course. The visitor 
employed by the State Board to select from the abundant applicants those best 
suited to care for the children writes : " We visit the (public) schools as well as the 
homes, thereby interesting the teachers, who, in a majority of cases, take a deep 
interest in those under our care. Our children average well with others in mental 
capacity, standing high in their classes at school and often carrying off the prizes at 
the end of the term for punctuality, perfect recitations and excellence of deportment. 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 11 



THE LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS. 

WESTBOROUGH. 



The Lyman School, located upon a farm of one hundred 
and seventy acres, is organized upon what is known as the 
family system ; i. e., the boys live in cottages sufficiently 
removed to allow each household to be wholly independent 
of the others. There are now seven cottages, each con- 
taining from 25 to 37 inmates. When the school was 
planned it was intended that the boys should be classified 
in families according to character, the more innocent 
to be thus protected from the more vicious ; and to en- 
sure total separation, each house was provided with its own 
school-room and work-room. Classification upon these 
lines, however, has proved to be neither desirable nor prac- 
ticable ; for boys are committed mostly for the same class of 
offences, — those against property ; they are all nearly of an 
age when they enter the school, — none are under twelve 
and all are under fifteen, the age limit ; and, until they have 
been some time in the institution, there is no way to dis- 
tinguish the better from the worse. As a matter of experi- 
ence the most advantageous classification proves to be by 
school standing. This secures graded schools, but it breaks 
the strict separation of families ; for, when boys rise in school 
grade, they must be transferred to another house or else, in 
a few cases, they may live in .one family and attend school in 
another. No evil effects are noted, however, from this 
slight amount of intercourse between the several households ; 
and the trustees are unanimously of the opinion that if Avith 
their present experience they were planning the school anew, 
they would modify the strictly family system to the extent 
of providing a general school-house and work shops. In 
dealing with girls, the trustees believe, as will be shown in 
the following report, that the strictly family system and 
classification by offences should be carefully preserved. 



12 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Apart from the school-room, the cottage system is un- 
doubtedly valuable. Dividing boys into small groups limits 
the opportunities for undesirable intimacies ; it also enables 
the master in charge of each household to gain a close 
knowledge of individuals ; and the influence of the matron, 
who often has young children, introduces elements which do 
much to counteract the unnatural conditions of institution 
life, always so much to be deprecated. In the arrange- 
ment of the houses and the discipline of the boys every 
aspect of a prison is discarded ; for it is found that, when 
boys do not feel themselves imprisoned and are treated as 
responsible moral agents, they can be trusted with their 
freedom to a surprising degree. True, every year there are 
a number of runaways ; but no effort is spared to find and 
bring these back, and the trouble of so doing is more than 
offset by the benefits of freedom to the great majority who 
do not abuse it. Of the 351 inmates who have been in the 
school within the year, 34 made successful escapes ; 13 of 
these were captured the same day, 13 within a week, 6 after 
a somewhat longer period, and only 2 are still at large. 

Runaways when captured may be punished by a simple 
loss of credits and a whipping, or confinement in the lock-up 
may be added. The lock-up is a room of not less than 240 
cubic feet and is well ventilated and lighted. The trustees 
realize that even such confinement is subject to grave objec- 
tions, but in some cases it is hard to find a substitute for it. 
Sometimes a boy who is evidently restless is kept in the 
lock-up at night instead of sleeping with the other boys in 
the open dormitory, or is made to stay by the master during 
play hours. Persistent runaways, who show themselves un- 
willing to profit by an open school, the trustees believe 
should be transferred to Concord. Happily, however, no 
cases of transfer for such cause have occurred within the 
year. The trustees are persuaded that the only satisfactory 
way to hold boys is to convince them that there is only one 
successful way out of the school, — that of honorable re- 
lease ; and to fill them with a law-abiding spirit. 

The school is in no sense a simple place of detention. Its 
effort is, in a broad sense, educational, and during the in- 
cumbency of the present superintendent constant progress 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 13 

has been made in developing appropriate methods for arous- 
ing the interest and awakening the faculties of pupils re- 
cruited from the truant and vagrant classes. From two to 
five and from half-past six to eight, all assemble in their 
respective school-rooms ; in addition to the ordinary lessons 
appropriate to their years, observation lessons by the col- 
lection and study of plants and minerals ; drawing, mechan- 
ical and free-hand ; singing from note, composition and 
gymnastics, have been successively introduced. The teach- 
ing of the school-room is in systematic relation to that of the 
manual training room. Here classes in wood-work after the 
Sloyd system are held in the morning, every boy receiving 
one lesson, and some two lessons, a week. New-comers now 
receive twelve lessons in mechanical drawing before they 
begin to work with tools, as the pupils make their own 
working drawings from measurements given out bv the 
teacher. (See superintendent's report, p. 61.) 

The principles underlying the system of education are 
explained in detail in the report for 1891, from which the 
following is quoted : — 

The "Educational Sloyd" differs from the instruction that can 
be obtained in an ordinary carpenter's shop in providing a syste- 
matic series of lessons which require of the pupil practical exer- 
cises in multiplication, division and fractions. He must discover 
for himself how many inches make a foot and how many six- 
teenths there are in an inch ; by a carefully planned progression 
which he is able to comprehend, he is taught a new process with 
each new tool. Any imperfection in measurement or in execution 
brings its own penalty in results which he can see and which he 
cannot evade, and, according to his faithfulness, or his heedless- 
ness, the completed work, whether a simple wedge or a dove-tail 
joint, becomes a source of satisfaction or of regret. He is now 
prepared to apply his skill to common carpentering, cabinet- 
making or other trades. 

At each step the work of the school-room is related to that of 
the manual training. Preliminary work in clay modelling and 
drawing prepares the pupil to understand the principles familiarly 
recognized in the workshop. Besides learning what any country- 
bred boy would be ashamed not to know about the grain of the 
wood and other practical matters, his eye is trained to a nicer 
perception and his hand to a nicer skill. His observation lessons 



14 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

now become interesting as he studies the bean plant in embryo 
and at various stages of growth, sketching it as well as he can, 
and describing it in his written exercise. The habit of thus 
recording what he has himself observed prepares him to reproduce 
what he gathers from reading upon any subject in which he is 
interested. The importance to this class of boys of forming a 
taste for good reading can hardly be overstated. Biographical 
sketches compiled from various sources and read at the close of 
the summer term, showed that many of the Lyman School boys 
had been reading and studying intelligently and with a purpose. 

An integral element in the school system is the military 
drill (all in uniform and armed with real swords and 
muskets), and the physical culture drill after the Swedish 
or Ling system. The latter is practised daily, and is 
admirably adapted to developing obedience, promptness 
and self-control. Such exercises, valuable to every one, are 
especially so to those who, as is the case with many crim- 
inals, have ill-developed nervous centres. (See report of 
instructor of gymnastics, page 75.) Both the military and 
physical culture drill are paid for from the Lyman Fund. 

These various educational efforts have undoubtedly effected 
a marked change in the mental habits of the boys. A more 
alert bearing, a better tone of conversation, a greater inter- 
est in lessons and in serious reading, is noted. Only those 
who knew the school a few years ago, or who are familiar 
with juvenile reformatories of the old-fashioned type, can 
appreciate the extent of the advance. It is significant that 
whereas in past time, when the school was conducted upon 
the prison plan, the number of whippings and confinements 
in the lock-up are recorded during the six months of 1878 
as averaging thirty-one a month to a hundred boys, in 1886, 
when the school had been reorganized upon the family plan, 
but was without any of the special training which has since 
been introduced, the punishments fell to an average of ten a 
month per hundred boys ; and this year they have fallen to 
eight per month per hundred boys, — a total decrease of 
seventy-five per cent. 

Such hours in the morning as are not spent in the manual 
training classes or in drilling are devoted, during the winter 
months or in inclement weather, to various industries, — 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 15 

heel cutting, weaving mats for hot-beds, chair-seating 
and tailoring. These industries are slightly remunerative, 
but not sufficiently so to make it worth while to carry 
them on except for the sake of keeping the boys busy ; they 
have, however, little educational value, and it is desired 
that occupations tending directly to develop skill in the 
workers shall be gradually substituted for them. At 
present much less time is spent at such uneducational work 
than formerly. Half a dozen or more boys work in the 
morning throughout the year in the printing room ; as many 
others work in the barn, and learn milking and the care of 
cattle, hens, etc. In each family from six to eleven boys 
must always be detailed for housework ; but such a rotation 
of duties is arranged that the same ones are rarely so occu- 
pied for more than three months at a time. 

At the proper seasons, out-door work upon the farm and 
grounds is substituted for the in-door industries. A kitchen 
garden is allotted to each family, that the boys may raise 
the produce they themselves consume, thus enjoying a 
larger or smaller supply of fruit and vegetables, according 
to their own diligence. All the boys, in one way or 
another, put some labor into this garden plot. Much work 
has also been done in the way of making roads and drains, 
carting and sorting brick for the new building, etc. 

All commitments to the Lyman School are for minority. 
This amounts to an indeterminate sentence, the boys being 
released on probation long before their terms expire. 
Formerly it was the custom to usually release after about 
one year in the school ; but the trustees, noting the fact 
that many who did well in the institution and went out full 
of good resolutions fell back into evil courses, considered that 
the time of detention must be insufficient to effect a radical 
change of character. It is evident that children who have 
grown up in the street, perhaps in the gutter, ever since 
they were born, fall into crime, not necessarily from innate 
viciousness, but from a bad rearing, from idleness, from 
laziness and a lack of all habits of self-control ; and to 
implant better habits, first by enforcing hard work and strict 
discipline, and second by awakening the dormant faculties 
of these street Arabs, demands time as well as education. 



16 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Therefore, with the increased advantages introduced into 
the school, the trustees have increased the time of detention. 
It is now required that boys shall earn a certain number of 
credits before they can become candidates for release. The 
names of those who have attained the honor grade are then 
presented to the trustees for action. This removes the 
element of arbitrariness from the length of the term ; every 
boy knows that he decides the matter for himself by his 
daily conduct. Marks are posted weekly, that all may 
realize how they stand. Exceptionally good boys can earn 
their release in a year ; a majority stay in the school for 
eighteen months or more ; and over thirty per cent, of this 
year's releases had been in the institution for more than two 
years. On page 70 will be found a table giving the figures. 
This method of release and the lengthened detention have 
produced excellent results. 

In considering the question of release, the trustees require 
a detailed report upon the home and its surrounding con- 
ditions ; the nature of the offence for which the boy was 
committed ; whether he had previously been before the 
court, or been in other institutions ; and the superintendent's 
estimate of his character. This year sixty per cent, were re- 
leased to their parents ; the rest are placed out with farmers. 

Previous to 1889, the boys in places were visited by 
agents of the State Board of Lunacy and Charity who had 
other and more pressing duties, and those at their homes 
were not visited at all. Since 1889, the Board has 
employed a visitor whose sole business is the supervision of 
Lyman School boys, whether in places or in their homes, 
and all are held now to a strict probation. Those who are 
idle or who run away from their places are recalled to the 
school, no pains being spared to capture runaways ; and 
those who prove incorrigible are transferred to the Massa- 
chusetts Reformatory at Concord. 

There were : — 

In the school Sept. 30, 1891, 200 

Committed by court, .125 

Recommitted by court, 2 

Returned from places, . . . . ... . . .28 

Total, 355 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 17 

Of these 355 there were : — 

Released on probation to parents, . 75 

Released on probation to places, 45 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory, . . . •» .5 

Transferred'to Bridgewater, . 5 

Discharged as unfit subjects, 2 

Runaways, 2 

Returned to court, 1 

Died, 1 

Remaining in school Oct. 1, 1892, 219 

Total, , . ... 355 

The average number in the school was 203.88-}-. ■ 
The names of boys are kept upon the books of the school 
until their sentence expires, when they come of age. There 
is now a total of 695 upon this list; 219 of these, as seen 
above, are in the institution ; 135 had left the school by re- 
lease, transfer or escape during the year, and 341 at various 
intervals during the last five or six years. This gives 475 
boys now outside the school and still under 21. Of these 
the records show : — 

Released out of the State, 18 

Enlisted in navy, 8 

Discharged as unfit subjects, .... . . 10 

Transferred to School for Feeble-minded, ..... 2 

Transferred to State Primary School, 3 

Lost sight of 35 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory (this year), . . . 5 

Transferred to Massachusetts Reformatory (previous year), . . 15 

Sentenced by court to Massachusetts Reformatory, .... 39 

Transferred or sentenced to other penal institutions, ... 17 

Known to be doing badly, 14 

Known to be doing well, 314 

475 

Reducing these figures to percentages, we find (subtracting 
the 15 who were discharged as unfit subjects, or transferred 
to the School for the Feeble-minded or to the State Primary 
School) that the present conduct and condition of 12 per 
cent, is unknown (this includes those who entered the 
navy, or were released out of the State) ; that 19 per cent, 
are known to have been to prison or to other penal institu- 



18 TRUSTEES' REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

tions or to be now doing ill ; and that 68 per cent, are known 
to be now doing well. While this is a far less satisfactory 
showing than could be desired, it is probable that, if equally 
careful records were kept by similar institutions, the result 
would prove favorable to the Lyman School. 

A present cause of embarrassment to the institution is its 
steadily increasing numbers. The commitments since the 
reorganization of the school have been : — 

In 1886-87, 93 

1887-88, 99 

1888-89, 124 

1889-90, 92 

1890-91, 109 

1891-92, 125 

All the families are now crowded beyond their proper 
capacity, and it seems probable that another house must 
soon be built. 

A deficiency appropriation of $1,187.96 was necessary 
last year to remedy serious defects discovered in the drain- 
age of the cottage known as " Willow Park," where typhoid 
fever developed. The plumbing of this house was thoroughly 
renovated ; but, as explained in the report of the physician 
(page 77), the present sewage system of the institution is 
wholly unsatisfactory. A special appropriation will there- 
fore be asked for, to connect the school with the town 
sewer. 

It is further recommended that electric lighting be intro- 
duced into the family houses. A good light is necessary in 
the school-rooms during the evening sessions, and the use of 
so many lamps is apt to make the air foul. Further, 
the risk of fire from kerosene is worth considering. Twice 
within the year there have been two narrow escapes from 
conflagrations, caused by broken lamps. 

The bakery and manual training building, for which 
$7,500 was granted last year, is nearing completion, and 
promises to give satisfaction. 

The appropriation last year was $27,500 for current ex- 
penses and $19,085 for salaries, — a total of $46,585. The 
net per capita cost was $4.76. These figures do not include 
the expenditure of $1,510.92 from the Lyman Fund. 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 19 



STATE INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS. 

LANCASTER. 



This institution is on the cottage plan, with four family 
houses from two hundred to three hundred feet apart, an old- 
fashioned cottage occupied by the superintendent's family, a 
chapel, farmhouse, barn and other buildings, upon one 
hundred and seventy-six acres of farm land and a wood lot 
of ten acres. There have been few alterations since the site 
was chosen and the buildings planned by the State commis- 
sioners, Messrs. Jno. H. Wilkins, Henry B. Rogers and 
Francis B. Fay, in 1855. The only new building put up of 
late years has been a barn. This year the chapel, of wood, 
which had been purchased as it stood in South Lancaster 
and moved into the school grounds, had become unsafe on 
account of its rotten timbers, and is being replaced by a 
brick chapel. 

Each of these family houses is occupied by from eighteen ' 
to twenty-five girls, with their matron, teacher and house- 
keeper. The girls are classified not according to age but 
with reference to their moral character, as nearly as this can 
be ascertained at the time of trial. Transfer from one house 
to another is made only in case some girl is found to be 
worse than was at first expected and injurious to others by 
her degrading conduct or conversation. In such a case she 
would be removed to a family especially reserved for girls 
who had committed offences of that class. Except in these 
rare instances there would be no transfer from house to house, 
even for promotion, each girl going through the whole 
course of a year or more of training in the household to 
which she had been originally assigned. The superin- 
tendent thoroughly believes in the superiority of the cottage 
system for such a school, not only because this classification 



20 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

according to moral character reduces to a minimum the 
danger of contamination, but also because she finds that the 
girls need and value the personal influence of ' ' Mother X " 
and of " Aunties Y and Z." Each house-mother has her own 
methods of dealing with her household, and there prevails 
an atmosphere of industry and tranquillity essential to the 
development of voluntary self-control. The teacher of 
school lessons and the housekeeper, who is in fact a teacher 
of cooking with its accompanying household arts, is respon- 
sible each for her own department. Girls who had before 
known no decent home life become interested in working 
together to make their houses clean, bright and cheerful, 
while the superintendent, in consultation with the house 
officers, is constantly devising new methods for inspiring 
them with an ambition to make their lives clean and useful, 
and " to be somebody," as the school phrase goes. 

A few, especially among the new-comers, have, as in 
other years, run away from the school, but, through prompt 
action on the part of the officers, have in every instance 
been speedily recovered. There are no walls enclosing the 
grounds, and the out-door work, from seed time to harvest- 
ing, has given opportunity enough for escapes if there had 
been any serious restlessness. On the contrary, this out-of- 
door work, mostly under the direction of Miss Morse, already 
an experienced teacher, has been heartily enjoyed by the 
girls and has greatly benefited their health of body and 
mind. 

After five or six months of general training: in housework, 
knitting, sewing and cutting, each girl is promoted to the 
care of the cellar, lamps and furnace. Then come two 
months in the laundry, with responsibility for the work of 
the other girls as well as for her own. Next in order is 
yeast and bread making and cooking for the girls. During 
the last month of her training she is taught to make pastry 
and rolls, with other breakfast dishes, and is now, provided 
her good conduct has kept pace with her acquirements, con- 
sidered ready to take a place in a private family. Places 
offer in abundance at all seasons, and the work of the girls 
brings them generally from $1.50 to $2.50 per week. A 
quarter of their earnings is, if possible, to be put at interest 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT— No. 18. 21 

till the depositor comes of age or is married. Over $1,200 
has been so deposited this year. The superintendent op- 
poses any attempt on the part of the girl or of her em- 
ployer to conceal the fact of her having been at the school. 
After having spent a year or more in the attempt to lead 
her girls to speak and act the truth, she would not have 
them induced, through mistaken kindness on the part of 
their employers, to tell or act a lie. On the contrary, she 
tells them that it is the better girls who have not tried to 
conceal this, but have lived it down. As has been well 
said, "A sin undetected is the soil out of which fresh sin 
will grow." * 

The following table is made out with care, in order to 
give an accurate and fair presentation of the status of each 
girl in the custody of the school, and especially of those on 
probation, with the reasons for the recall of those returned 
to the school, whether for serious fault, unsatisfactory con- 
duct or simply for change of place or on account of illness. 
It will be seen that, out of 284, only 15 are out of knowl- 
edge. Some of these 15 have been heard of, and would be 
transferred to Sherborn had not the commissioners decided 
to receive none who are within a year of their majority. 

Statistics. 

During the year there have been in the school for more or less 

time, 176 

In the school Sept. 30, 1891, . . . . ■ . . 91 
Returned to the school, having been placed out in 
former years, . . . . . . . . .35 

New commitments, . .50 

Total, . . — 176 

The following disposition was made of these girls : — 

In the school Sept. 30, 1892, 82 

Placed in families, ... 72 

With friends, ......... 6 

Married, ... . . ... . . . 4 

School for the Feeble-minded, 1 

Reformatory Prison, 1 

* F. W Robertson, quoted by Dr. S. G. Howe, Report of Board of State 
Charities, 1868-69. 



22 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

In other institutions, not penal, 3 

Discharged, not a citizen, 1 

Died, 1 

Ran away from place, not recovered, 4 

Of age, 1 

Total, — 176 

There have been placed out during the year, *128 

Of those placed on probation both this year and in former 
years, 70 have been recalled to the school for the following 
reasons, viz. : — 

For serious immorality, 5 

unsatisfactory conduct, . . . . . . .12 

change of place, or for rest after hard work, . . .23 

illness, .14 

larceny, .1 

From probation with parents, 7 

For running away from place, 8 

Total recalled to the school, — 70 

Total in custody Sept. 30, 1891, 272 

Committed this year, 50 

Total in custody during the year, — 322 

Of whom there have attained their majority, . . . .36 

Discharged, not a citizen, ....... 1 

Died, 2 

Total who have come of age, been discharged or died, . — 39 

Of the 284 still under twenty-one years of age and in the 
custody of the school there are : — 

At work in families, 120 

On probation with friends, ....... 28 

Married in former years, 19 

Married this year, 10 

At school, 1 

Total self-supporting, — 178 

In the school Sept. 30, 1892, 82 

Transferred to Reformatory Prison in former years, . . 4 

Transferred to Reformatory Prison this year, ... 1 

In institutions, not penal, 4 

Total still supported by the State, — 91 

* Of the 128 placed out there have been placed once, . . . .116 

" " twice 8 

" " three times, ... 4 
Whole number of placings out, — 128 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 23 

Ran away from place in former years, not recovered, . . 9 
Ran away from place this year, not recovered, ... 6 

— 15 

Total still in care of trustees, 284 

From the above list we have selected a few cases which 
show the good results of the care expended upon them : — 

, when brought to the school, was pronounced " one 

of the hardest cases " the officer ever had to deal with, 
not only on account of her temper, but also from her knowl- 
edge of evil. For a long time she needed much care and 
oversight, but at last began to improve, till she earned her 
opportunity to be placed out. She was kindly treated by 
her employer, whom she in return faithfully nursed during 
her last illness. In her new place she continued to do welL 

apparently united the bad tendencies of pauper 

parentage with those of a wild girl, while at the same time 
affectionate and intelligent. She first failed to do well on 
probation. Later she came to announce her marriage to a 
former friend. Her home, when visited, gave evidence of 
excellent management, greatly to the satisfaction of her hus- 
band. 

was accidentally met by the superintendent, to 

whom she introduced her husband. An invitation to tea and 
to admire the new baby was cordially accepted. 

, once a most discouraging girl, is now happily 

married. 

was visited by the superintendent without previous 

notice. There also was a cordial invitation to tea beside a 
bright stove, with good cooking. 

had left all her savings on deposit for two years 

after her marriage, but finally asked for it, to enable her 
husband to buy a cranberry patch. 

, after several years in one place, is paying from her 

own savings for her education. 

The trustees take this opportunity to express their recog- 
nition of the valuable services of the State Board's visitors, 
both salaried and volunteer, in the care of the girls placed 
out from the school. The salaried visitor who can devote 
her whole time to her work may acquire a degree of skill 



24 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

in discovering the condition of children too young or too 
timid to mention their ailments of body or mind such as 
the volunteer visitor seldom attains. The volunteer's range 
of experience is limited to her half-dozen wards ; she is often 
preoccupied by other cares. On the other hand, her wards 
are of an age to speak for themselves, and what they most 
need is to feePthat there is a friend always within call, while 
they are the better for learning that this friend has other 
interests in which they can sometimes be allowed to share. 
If employers find the girls difficult to manage, they too can 
consult the local visitor at her home. While the volunteer 
visitors cannot always counteract the tendencies of those ex- 
ceptional girls who are bound to seek the low company which 
is to be found in every city or village, they can at least exer- 
cise a watchful care and report misconduct that might other- 
wise never come to the knowledge of the department. For 
the majority of the girls who are trying to behave well the 
volunteer visitors find rare opportunities for usefulness, 
encouraging them by friendly interest, often securing for 
them suitable companionship, and protecting them from 
many social perils. Without the care of the volunteer 
visitors it would have been hardly possible for so many of 
our w 7 ards to reach the positions they have acquired of 
honestly self-supporting members of society. At the central 
office are the salaried assistants, whose hearts are equally 
in the work, who are at all times and seasons found ready 
to direct or assist the volunteers, or to fill gaps for absen- 
tees. They frequently visit the school, and are thus enabled 
to select the right girl for the right place. They attend 
to all transient cases and act for the superintendent of the 
department in all emergencies, thereby rendering the unpaid 
service available. 

The limits of age for commitments to this school of girls 
charged with "leading an idle, vagrant or vicious life" 
(Public Statutes, chapter 89, section 25), or "stubborn 
children " (chapter 207, section 29 ; chapter 89, section 29), 
still stand upon the statutes as from seven to seventeen 
years of age ; but in practice no girls under twelve and very 
few under fourteen are now committed, because there is 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 25 

abundant provision in other institutions, public and private, 
or, still better, in private families, under cartful supervision, 
for u girls of tender years, innocent of crime and untrained 
to vice." The crimes committed by those whom the courts 
finally send to the Lancaster School are rarely serious of- 
fences against person or property, the charge of petty lar- 
ceny often being brought forward by relatives or friends, in 
order to secure the detention of a girl who is in danger of 
becoming unchaste, whose home influences have too often 
been such as to discourage a virtuous life, whom society 
fails to protect from worse than herself. These girls are, 
on an average, over fifteen years of age, and for such there 
is in Massachusetts no other institution, public or private, 
where they can be kept apart, on the one hand, from girls 
innocent of crime and on the other hand from adult and 
presumably more hardened offenders. The wards of the 
school are protected by its legal custody during minority, 
whether in the school or out on probation. They aie 
neither children nor women, but girls whose foolish or 
wrong acts may have been committed without having 
poisoned the whole nature to its core. It is upon this 
hope that the work of the school is founded. 

There is, however, an unaccountable apathy on the part 
of the community as to the harm that a young girl must 
suffer when her parents become drunkards or separate or 
lead bad lives, — an injury far more serious in its con- 
sequences to a girl of fifteen than to a younger child. 

Judge , a chief justice of the superior court, from his 

large experience wrote as follows : " How meagre and few 
are the safe pleasures, how strong the temptation to seek 
unsafe excitement, where toil and meagre means make it 
impossible for parents to give their growing sons and daugh- 
ters social pleasures ; " and another judge, in March, 1886: 
" I wonder that the subject does not arouse the women of 
the whole State. ... It is the saddest duty of my life 
to try to act for the best interests of those young, unfortu- 
nate girls;" and another, March, 1882: "To deal with 
them as we ought is very difficult. The tears of mothers 
pleading for the custody of their children has a tendency to 



26 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

warp judgment. If the mothers would only visit the insti- 
tution, I think they would willingly intrust their unruly 
children to your care." It is not, however, "unruly chil- 
dren " whom the trustees would have the courts commit to 
this school. It is the same individuals now committed 
there, but at an earlier stage of their misconduct. The 
claim of the parents upon the filial duty of their daughters 
might, one would suppose, have been earlier set aside in the 
girls' behalf in instances such as the following, which are 
found upon a list of fifty cases standing in the order of com- 
mitment : — 

, father in the house of correction ; mother about 

to be evicted for nonpayment of rent ; both drunkards 
(girl's offence, " idle and disorderly"). 

, father harsh ; mother seems not quite sane ; the 

girl more neglected than anything else (offence, larceny) ; 
in fact, the girl was in danger of being ruined. 

, parents not living together ; father's house has a 



bad reputation. 

, parents not living together ; no restraint over the 

girl, who had been led astray by her employer. 

, mother in the house of correction. 

, father bad and intemperate. 

, parents not living together ; the girl had lived with 

a married sister and had been abused ; had cut all the 
wood used by the family last winter. 

, parents did not seem to take any interest in the 

girl, who had stolen repeatedly. 

, father mostly in an asylum ; mother intemperate. 

, parents not living together ; father keeping away 

on account of criminal charges ; mother said to be im- 
moral. 

, father did not appear at the trial, and refused to 

see the girl ; mother away, — believed to be bad. 

In more than one instance the danger had been recognized 
by the police. 

, brought by the police to the station for serious 

offences, but the father wanted to try her again ; a few 
months later, committed for a like offence, but more serious. 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 27 
, behaving very badly, while the probation officer 



had reported her doing well. 

, known to the police as a wild girl since she was 

eleven years of age ; not committed till she was sixteen. 

, convicted of a very serious offence ; put on pro- 
bation by the judge ; committed for a like offence a few 
months later (State agent not notified of the trial). 

Who can doubt that such continuance in a broken home 
or in a career of such reckless dissipation as is implied in 
the above instances, if only for an interval of a few weeks 
between the first arrest and the final commitment, must de- 
grade and disgrace a girl far more than could an earlier and 
more seasonable detention and commitment to the school? 
Among the girls who have proved most satisfactory have 
been several who had been carefully watched by private 
societies or guardians, and who, on proving unmanageable 
and in danger, were committed to the State Industrial 
School at the critical moment, before their lives had become 
tainted by actual vice. It is not the magistrates alone who 
are responsible for the delay in commitment, for they must 
act upon the case as it is presented to them. 

The trustees earnestly request the co-operation of the 
whole community in this work of reform, and especially on 
the important matter of watchfulness over girls who are in 
danger. The mistaken kindness which would leave a girl 
in bad company after the point of danger has been reached 
renders the work of reform,' far more difficult and too often 
quite impossible. 

The new chapel, for which a special appropriation of 
$6,500 was given (the old structure had been condemned as 
unsafe) , is in process of construction ; and the isolating hos- 
pital, for which $1,500 was granted, will be soon under 
way ; $500 was also granted for new floors in the girls* bed- 
rooms. A small appropriation for concrete walks will be 
asked this year. 

Last November tuberculosis appeared among the cattle, 
and made such ravages that the trustees were advised by 
Dr. Austin Peters, as the only effective measure to stamp 
out the disease, to kill the whole herd, disinfect the barn, 



28 TRUSTEES' REPORT INDUST'L SCHOOL. [Oct. 

and restock it with cattle bought in Maine, where the dis- 
ease was not prevalent. After consultation with the local 
board of health and the State cattle inspector, it was decided 
to act on this advice. The governor authorized the outlay 
of the necessary money, and the Legislature voted $1,026.66 
to reimburse the institution. 

The regular appropriation was $20,000, of which $8,000 
was for salaries and $12,000 for current expenses. The 
same will probably be needed for another year. The net 
per capita cost was $4.46. 

Respectfully submitted by the trustees, 

M. H. WALKER, Westborough, President. 
ELIZABETH G. EVANS, Boston, Secretary. 
HENRY C. GREELEY, Clinton, Treasurer. 
M. J. SULLIVAN, Chicopee. 
ELIZABETH C. PUTNAM, Boston. 
CHARLES P. WORCESTER, Newtonville. 
SAMUEL W. McDANIEL, Cambridge. 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



29 



TRUST FUNDS OP LYMAN SCHOOL. 



TREASURER'S ACCOUNT. 



Henry C. Greeley, 



Lyman Fund. 

Treasurer, in account with -Income or Lyman 
Fund. 



189 


i. 


Oct. 


1. 


Nov. 


2. 


1893. 


Jan. 


2. 




2. 




4. 




7. 




15. 


March 


7. 




7. 




81. 


April 


2. 




29. 


June 


30. 


July 


15. 


Sept. 


22. 




22. 




30. 



Oct. 



Nov. 



Dec. 



10. 
30. 
31. 
11. 
11. 
11. 
11. 
11. 
16. 
16. 
16. 
16. 



Dr. 

Balauce former account, .... 
Interest town of Northborough note, 

State tax refunded on account of bank stock, 
Clinton Savings Bank, 
Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 
Springfield Institution for Savings, 
Dividend Fitch burg R.R., . 
Interest on Old Colony R.R. bond, 
Interest on Worcester Street Railway bond, 
Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 
Dividend Citizens 1 National Bank, . 
interest town of Northborough note, 
Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 
Dividend Fitchburg R.R., . 
Interest on Old Colony R.R. bond, . 
Interest on Worcester Street Railway bond, 
Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 



Cr. 

Deposit in Clinton Savings Bank, 

Asa F. Howe, salary, . 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, . 

Wm. Reed & Son, swords, belts, etc., 

T. F. Chapin, expense of Alliston Greene, 

Asa F. Howe, salary, . 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

Louis Callin, teaching physical training 

Asa F. Howe, salary, 

Emma F. Newton, Honorarium, 

T. F. Chapin, Christmas, . 



$2,703 79 


30 00 


72 27 


1,000 00 


228 00 


100 00 


184 00 


30 00 


100 00 


286 00 


120 00 


30 00 


286 00 


184 00 


30 00 


100 00 


286 00 


$5,770 06 


$1,000 00 


12 50 


50 00 


115 75 


77 00 


12 50 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


12 50 


12 50 


50 00 



30 TREASURER'S REPORT TRUST FUNDS. [Oct. 



1892. 


Jan. 


4. 




8. 




8. 




8. 




16 




16. 


March 


7. 




7. 


' 


13. 




13. 




13. 


May 


23. 




23. 




23. 


June 


8 



July 9. 

9. 

15. 

Ausr. 8. 



Sept. 7. 
7. 



Boston & Albany R.R. Co., new stock, 

Alliston Greene, expense, gymnastics, 

Asa F. Howe, salary, . 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

Alliston Greene, salary, 

Asa F. Howe, salary, . 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

Alliston Greene, salary, 

Asa F. Howe, salary, . 

Alliston Greene, salary, 

Asa F. Howe, salary, 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

Asa F. Howe, salary, . 

T. F. Chapin, tour of inspection, 

Alliston Greene, salary, 

Annie L. Wilcox, fares to Boston, 

T. F. Chapin, Fourth of July celebration, 

Emma F. Newton, Honorarium, 

T. F. Chapin, expense to charity conference, 

Magic lantern, entertainments, 

Alliston Greene, salary, 

Asa F. Howe, salary, . 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

Alliston Greene, salary, 

Mary L. Pettit, salary, 

Balance forward, 



$2,610 


00 


77 00 


12 50 


50 00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


12 


50 


50 


00 


50 00 


52 


00 


12 


50 


25 


00 


12 50 


50 


00 


50 


00 


12 


50 


22 


00 


25 


00 


42 


96 


25 00 


12 


50 


100 00 


12 


00 


41 


66 


25 


00 


100 00 


20 55 


50 00 


649 


14 



$5,770 06 
HENRY C. GREELEY, Treasurer. 



Sept. 30, 1892. 
Examined and approved 



M. H. Walker. 
Elizabeth G-. Evans. 



Mary Lamb Fund, Lyman School, State Industrial School. 

Henry C. Greeley, Treasurer, in account ivith Income of Mary 
Lamb Fund, Lyman School. 



i89i. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Balance of former account, 



$191 93 



1892. 

Jan. 2. Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., 

March 7. Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., Mary Lamb, . 

June 30. Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., Mary Lamb, . 

Sept. 30. Dividend Boston & Albany R.R., Mary Lamb, . 



10 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 


12 


00 



$237 93 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 31 

1892. CR. 

Jan. 4. Boston & Albany R.R., new share, . . . $90 00 

Balance forward, 147 93 



$237 93 

Sept. 30, 1892. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walker. 

Elizabeth G-. Evans. 



Henry C. Greeley, Treasurer, in account with Income of Mary 
Lamb Fund, Industrial School. 

i89i. Dr. 

Oct. 1. Balance of former account, . . . $27 92 

1893. 

Jan. 2. State tax refunded on bank stock, 
March 31. Dividend Boston National Bank, 
Sept. 30. Dividend Boston National Bank, 

1891. Cr. 

Dec. 11. Mrs. L. L. Brackett, superintendent, Christmas, 

1892. 

July 9. Mrs. L. L. Brackett, superintendent, Fourth of 

July, ........ 20 00 

Balance forward, 66 40 



18 


48 


32 


50 


32 


50 


$111 40 


$25 


00 



$111 40 
HENRY C. GREELEY, Treasurer. 



Sept. 30, 1892. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 

Elizabeth Gr. Evans. 



Fay Fund, State Industrial School. 

Henry C. Greeley, Treasurer, in account with Income of Fay Fund, 
Industrial School. 

i89i. Dr. 

Nov. 21. Interest from Chelsea Savings Bank, . . $20 40 

i89i. Cr. 

Nov. 21. Paid Mrs. L. L. Brackett, superintendent, for 

best girls, $20 40 

HENRY C. GREELEY, Treasurer. 

Sept. 30, 1892. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 

Elizabeth G. Evans. 



32 TREASURER'S REPORT TRUST FUNDS. [Oct.'92. 



Inventory of Lyman School Investments, Lyman Fund. 



143 shares Boston & Albany R.R. stock, 
92 shares Fitchburg R.R. stock, 
40 shares Citizens' National Bank stock, 
1 $1,000 Old Colony R.R. bond, . 
4 Worcester Street Railway bonds, 
Note, town of Northborough, . 
Deposit Monson Savings Bank, . 
Deposit Ware Savings Bank, 
Deposit Palmer Savings Bank, . 
Deposit Hampden Savings Bank, 
Deposit Springfield Five Cent Savings Bank 
Deposit Springfield Institution for Savings, 
Deposit People's Savings Bank, Worcester, 
Deposit Worcester County Institution for 

Savings, . . 
Deposit Westborough Savings Bank, 
Deposit Amherst Savings Bank, 
Deposit Worcester Five Cent Savings Bank, 
Deposit Clinton First National Bank, 



Par Value. 

$14,300 00 
9,200 00 
4,000 00 
1,000 00 
4,000 00 
1,500 00 
1,071 80 
1,093 05 
1,082 42 
1,082 42 
1,082 42 
980 42 
1,071 30 

1,060 80 
1,071 80 
1,054 66 
1,060 80 
649 14 



Market Value. 

$28,600 00 
6,900 00 
4,800 00 
1,050 00 
4,000 0© 
1,500 00 
1,071 80 
1,093 05 
1,082 42 
1,082 42 
1,082 42 
980 42 
1,071 30 

1,060 80 
1,071 80 
1,054 46 
1,060 80 
649 14 



Mary Lamb Fund. 

Six shares Boston & Albany R.R. stock, . 
Deposit in People's Savings Bank, Worcester, 
Deposit in Clinton First National Bank, . 



Par Value. Market Value. 

$600 00 $1,200 00 

532 63 532 63 

147 93 147 93 



HENRY C. GREELEY, Treasurer. 

Sept. 30, 1892. 
Examined and approved: M. H. Walkee. 

Elizabeth G-. Evans. 



Inventory of Industrial School Investments, Mary Lamb 

Fund. 

Par Value. Market Value. 

Thirteen shares Boston National Bank stock, . $1,300 00 

Deposit in Clinton First National Bank, . 66 40 $66 40 

Fay Fund. 

Deposit in Chelsea Savings Bank, . . . $1,041 20 $1,041 20 

Rogers Fund. 
One Stale of Maine 6 per cent, bond, in custody 

of State treasurer, $1,000 00 

HENRY C. GREELEY, Treasurer. 

Sept. 30, 1892. 
Examined and approved : M. H. Walker. 

Elizabeth G-. Evans. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 



STATE PRIMARY SCHOOL 



MONSON. 



SUPEEINTENDENT'S EEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

Entering upon the duties of superintendent of the State 
Primary School so late in the school year (August 1), the 
report herewith submitted must of necessity be one of statis- 
tics rather than a record of personal work accomplished or 
suggestions for future action. To avoid what seemed to 
me unnecessary repetition, I have combined some tables, 
without, however, omitting any essential facts. 



There were present Oct. 1, 1891, . 

Afterward received, .... 

Whole number under care, 

Average population, .... 

Greatest number (present Feb. 20, 1892), 

Smallest number (present July 26, 1892), 

Present at close of the year (Sept. 30, 1892) 

Greatest number last year, 

Smallest number last year, . 

Average number last year, 

The number placed on trial the present year 

The number placed on board was . 

The number placed on trial last year was 

The number already on board was 



329 
415 
744 
293 
362 
218 
271 
370 
292 
329 
339 

78 
200 

71 



The annual appropriation, from which the entire expenses 
of the school must be met, was $51,000, as against $52,000 
last year. The per capita cost, however, owing to the de- 
crease in numbers, this year was $3.58, as compared with 
$3.02 last year. The appropriation for boarding out chil- 
dren was $9,000, against $7,000 a year ago. From this ap- 
propriation there will be a surplus to be turned back into 
the treasury. As the appropriations are made for calendar 
years, while the reports are made for years ending Septem- 



36 SUPT.'S REPORT PRIMARY SCHOOL. [Oct. 

ber 30, it will readily be seen that, while the expenditures 
are kept within the yearly appropriations, the expense for 
the institution year may be larger or smaller than the appro- 
priation, including, as it does, parts of two calendar years. 

Health of the Institution. 
It will be seen by the report of the resident physician 
that, with the exception of the measles, which were epidemic 
from February till May and of which there were in all one 
hundred and twenty-two cases, the health of the institution 
has been excellent. There have been seven deaths from 
natural causes, and one casualty. The subject of the latter 
was Nellie Maxfield, an inmate woman who ran away the night 
of September 24, and whose mangled remains were found on 
the tracks of the Boston & Albany Railroad about two miles 
from the institution. 

Fire-escapes. 

Under a special appropriation therefor a double row of 
iron balconies, extending around both wings of the main 
building, have been put up, thus affording a safe exit from all 
the dormitories to the ground. 

Added to the ordinary repairs, three water-closets, one in 
the girls' basement and two in the office basement, having 
become a menace to the health of the institution, have been 
replaced by new ones of modern pattern. 

Schools. 
Under teachers of long experience, and thoroughly ac- 
quainted with the requirements of a school of this nature, 
very satisfactory work has been done, a detailed report of 
which accompanies and forms a part of this document. It 
is, however, my desire to make physical training more prom- 
inent by introducing a special teacher in that department for 
a season, when we hope to take it up and carry it on as a 
regular branch of study. I also heartily concur in the opin- 
ion expressed in a former report concerning the value of 
Sloyd work for our children, and shall hope to make it even 
more effective. 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 37 



The Farm. 

The work on the farm has been seriously handicapped by 
the disastrous fire which occurred early in April, destroying 
the cow barn and all the hay and grain it contained. Fort- 
unately, it happened in the daytime, and all the stock, with 
the exception of one cow, was saved. A most searching 
investigation failed to establish the exact origin of this 
fire. The work of clearing away the debris and pre- 
paring for the new barn, the extra labor required to care 
for the stock in temporary and crowded quarters, and 
the hay and grain purchased to replace that destroyed > 
not only delayed the work of the spring-time, but affected 
the balance sheet as well. The new barn which replaces 
the one destroyed by fire is an imposing structure, built 
with special reference to sanitary principles, and is expected 
to be a model of its kind. 

The hay and corn crops have been fully up to the average, 
but the yield of potatoes and other vegetables will be less 
than usual ; the apple crop will be about one-fourth the usual 
supply.. 

Other Statistics. 

For other statistics and important facts you are referred 
to the various statements appended to this report. State- 
ment A shows the number of children received from various 
sources, and also the number sent out on trial, on board, 
etc. Statement B shows the nativity of the new arrivals 
during the year. Statement C shows the current expenses. 
Statement D gives a list of the officers employed, and the 
sum paid to each. Statement E shows the products of the 
farm, and statements F and Gr show the work done in the 
sewing-rooms. Statement H shows the sums spent of vari- 
ous appropriations. Statement I relates to the employ- 
ment of children, and Statement J shows the facts in regard 
to children boarded out. Statement K is a summary of the 
inventory, Statement L shows the resources and liabilities, 
and Statement M is a resume of the farm account. 



38 SUPT.'S REPORT PRIMARY SCHOOL. [Oct.'92. 



In Conclusion. 

In the work of making self-supporting and useful citizens 
from the children placed in our public institutions no human 
agency is, in my opinion, more effective than the power of a 
good example constantly before them. It is sometimes said 
that every officer in such a school as this should be a teacher ; 
but it is most emphatically true that every officer from the 
highest to the lowest is a teacher, either for good or ill. 
An officer who cannot restrain his temper, bridle his tongue, 
and feel kindly and be helpful to the children under his im- 
mediate care, has no call to an institution of this character. 
I am happy in this connection to testify to the general desire 
on the part of the officers of this institution to attain this 
ideal. 

Placed by your Board in a position so full of responsi- 
bility, embracing the physical, mental and moral develop- 
ment of these wards of the State, I trust I am not wholly 
insensible to the confidence reposed nor the high duties re- 
quired. Seeking that wisdom which is profitable to direct, 
and looking to your Board for advice which has hitherto 
been so kindly given, I hopefully enter on the duties of 
the year before me. 

• Respectfully submitted, 

WALTER A. WHEELER, 

Superintendent. 





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40 



STATISTICS PRIMARY SCHOOL 



[Oct. 



Statement A. — Summary of Admissions and Discharges. 





Boys. 


Girls. 


Women. 


Totals. 


Present Sept, 30, 1891, . 


259 


58 


12 


329 


Received from State Almshouse at Tewks- 










bury, 


38 


22 


5 


65 


Received from Superintendent of In-door 










Poor as juvenile offenders, 


68 


4 


_ 


72 


Received from Superintendent of In-door 










Poor as neglected children, 


46 


26 


_ 


72 


Received from Superintendent of In-door 










Poor as dependent children, . 


17 


10 


- 


27 


Received from Deaf and Dumb Asylum at 










Hartford, 


1 


1 


_ 


2 


Received, not classified, . . . 


3 


1 


1 


5 


Returned, placed in previous years, . 


54 


19 


- 


73 


Returned, having been placed out since 










Sept, 30, 1891, 


80 


18 


1 


99 


Totals, 


566 


159 


19 


744 


Discharged by Board of Lunacy and Charity, 


23 


12 


2 


37 


Placed out on trial, 


274 


64 


1 


339 


Boarded out in families, .... 


54 


24 


_ 


78 


Removed to State Almshouse at Tewks- 










bury, ....... 


_ 


1 


_ 


1 


Removed to Lyman School for Boys at 










Westborough, ...... 


2 


_ 


_ 


2 


Removed to Deaf and Dumb Asylum at 










Hartford, Conn., 


1 


1 


_ 


2 


Removed to Briclgewater State Farm, 


1 


_ 


_ 


1 


Removed to School for Feeble-minded at 










Waltham, 


2 


1 


_ 


3 


Died, 


2 


5 


1 


8 


Eloped and not returned, .... 


1 


- 


1 


2 


Totals, 


360 


108 


5 


473 


Remaining Sept. 30, 1892, .... 


206 


51 


14 


271 



Statement B. — Nativity of Inmates. 

The nativity of the 239 persons received during the year (not in- 
cluding those returned from places) is as follows : — 



Native born, 
Foreign born, 
Unknown, 



179 
46 
14 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



41 



Statement C. — Current Expenditures in Detail. 



Salaries and wages of officers and employees, 

Wages of persons temporarily employed, 

Fruit and vegetables, .... 

Meat and fish, . . • . 

Flour, .... 

Grain, feed and meal, 

Tea, coffee and chocolate, 

Sugar and molasses, 

Milk, butter, eggs and cheese, 

Other groceries and provisions, 

Clothing, boots and shoes, 

Furniture, beds, bedding, soap, kitchen and table ware 

Hospital supplies, . 

Fuel and lights, 

Books and school supplies, 

Blacksnrithing and repairs of tools, wagons and harness, 

Repairs, ordinary, .... 

Express, freight and passenger fares, 

Stationery, postage, newspapers, etc., 

Expense of Sunday services, . 

Seeds, plants, fertilizers and agricultural implements, 

Pasturage, 

Live stock, ...... 

Expense of inventory, 

Extra medical attendance and nursing, 

Miscellaneous, ..... 

Total 



$17,546 74 

349 82 

133 32 

3,691 06 

2,100 60 

1,811 57 

704 62 

1,008 83 

2,886 76 

929 04 

6,027 42 

1,445 13 

436 90 

7,909 41 

355 24 

345 48 

3,908 57 

484 45 

331 45 

255 00 

268 17 

194 00 

320 50 

72 00 

628 62 

413 65 

$54,558 35 



42 



STATISTICS PRIMARY SCHOOL. 



[Oct, 






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Superintendent, . 

Superintendent, . 

Engineer, 

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Physician, . 

Clerk, . 

Baker, . 

Care of dining hall, 

Supervisor, . 

Supervisor, . 

Supervisor, . 

Supervisor, . 

Supervisor, . 

Expressman, 

Matron, 

Matron, 

Assistant matron, 

Assistant matron, 

Assistant matron, 

Assistant matron, 

Housekeeper, 

Housekeeper, 

Housekeeper, 


S 








Amos Andrews, . 
Walter A. Wheeler, 
Joseph H. Kenerson, 
L. A. Calver, M.D., . 
Elizabeth Gable, M D., 
James J. Prentiss, . 
Frank Duffy, . 
E. G. Buss,. 
E. G. Ward, 
Wm. M. Watson, . 
Frank U. Wetmore, 
Frank U. Wetmore, 
B. F. Moore, 
J. M. Sisk, . 
Mrs. M. A. Andrews ^ . 
Mrs. M. A. Wheeler, 
Miss Mary A. Reed, 
Mrs. G. A. Watson, 
Mrs. C. W. Moore, . 
Miss N. J. Rice, 
Mrs. Nellie McDowell, . 
Mrs. L. A. Smith, 
Mrs. Mary A. Royce, 


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1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



43 



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Mrs. Mary A. Royce, 
Miss E. M. Fullingtov, 

Miss Carrie E. Lacey, . 
Miss G. E. Andrews, . 
Miss G. A. Cheney, . 
Mrs. S. E. Prentiss,. 
Mrs. H. E. Darte, . 
Miss F. J. Dyer, 
Miss E. A. King, 
Miss E. S. Foster, 
Miss Solvi Greve, 
Miss R. F. Mudge, . 
Mrs. C. R. Warren, 
Mrs. S. E. Ward, . 
Miss J. M. Rogers, . 
Mrs. J. A. Buss, 
Mrs. S. A. Parkhurst, . 
Miss Mattie J. Strong, . 
Miss Ten ah Porter, 
Mrs. C. D. Clark, . 
Miss Hallie LaSelle, 
Miss Louisa Tapley, . 
Mrs. L. F. White, 
Miss Sadie F. Price, 
Miss L. E. Preston, . 
Mrs. Jane Julina, 
Miss Martha Farrell, . 
Miss Emma Gardner, . 
Mrs. Alice E. Gates, . 


0000000000000000000000000000 

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44 



STATISTICS PRIMARY SCHOOL. 



[Oct, 



^ 



3 





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Hospital cook, 
Hospital cook, 
Laundress, . 
Assistant laundress, 
Assistant laundress, 
Assistant laundress, 
Assistant laundress, 
Quarantine officer, 
Shoemaker, . 
Hospital attendant, 
Hospital attendant, 
Watchman, . 
Watchman (substitute 
Watchman, . 
Farmer, 
Gardener, 
Gardener, 
Teamster, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Assistant farmer, 
Fireman, 


< 








Mrs. H. S. McComber, 
Mrs. E. A. Kingman, . 
Miss Louise Tapley, 
Miss M. M. Lee, 
Miss Bridget Russell, 
Mrs. Helen McNab, 
Mrs. Viola Hart, . 
Mrs. B. M. Austin, . 
Mrs. Margaret McRaf, 
S. C. Rogers, . 
J. M. Sears, . 
S. B. Keith, 
Willard A. Warren, 
S. B. Keith, . 
Geo. A. Adams, . 
Edw. E. Walker, 
8. S. Nichols, 
Geo. H. Miller, 
Wm. H. Mason, . 
John McRae, . 
John Johnson, . 
Geo. H. Miller, . 
S. S. Nichols, . 
Samuel L. Howe, . • 
Geo. W. Carpenter, 


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1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



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46 



STATISTICS PRIMARY SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Statement E. — Products of the Farm. 



1892, 



Quantity. 



Apples, early, 
Apples, cider, 
Apples, winter, 
Asparagus, 
Beans, shell, 
Beans, string, 
Beef, 
Beets, 
Cabbage, . 
Carrots, . 
Celery, 
Cucumbers, 
Currants, . 

Eggs* 
Ensilage, . 
Fodder, 
Grapes, 

Hay, 

Indian corn, 
Ice, . 
Lettuce, . 
Manure, . 
Milk, 
Melons, 
Oats, 

Oat straw, 
Onions, 
Pears, 
Pease, 
Plums, 
Peppers, . 
Pop-corn, . 
Potatoes, . 
Parsnips, . 
Poultry, . 
Pork, 

Quinces, . 
Radishes, . 
Ruta-bagas, 
Rhubarb, . 

Rowen, 

Rye, . 

Rye straw, 

Strawberries, 

Spinach, . 

Squash, summer 

Squash, winter 

Sweet corn, 

Tomatoes, 

Turnips, . 

Veal, 

Wood, 



52 

250 

90 

14 



8,591 

156 

3,988 

20 

1,800 

551 

115 

323 

130 

6 

18f 

$ 133 

} 885 

115 

375 

50 

600 

103,481 

100 
2 
96i 
i 

2 

22f 

H 

i 

4 

10 

799 

75 

170 

9,138 

51 

3 

35 

43 

< 13 

I 1,445 

25 

4 

436 

10 

5| 

4,500 
1051 

60£ 
400 
923 

25 



bushels, 

bushels, 

barrels, 

bushels, 

bushels, 

bushels, 

pounds, 

bushels, 

heads, 

bushels, 

bunches, 

bushels, 

quarts, 

dozen, 

tons, 

tons, 

bushels, 

tons, 

pounds, 

bushels, 

tons, 

bushels, 

cords, 

quarts, 

bushels, 

tons, 

bushels, 

bushel, 

bushels, 

bushels, 

bushel, 

bushels, 

bushels, 

bushels, 

pounds, 

pounds, 

bushels, 

bushels, 

bushels, 

bushels, 

tons, 

pounds, 

bushels, 

tons, 

quarts, 

bushels, 

bushels, 

pounds, 

bushels, 

bushels, 

bushels, 

pounds, 

cords, 



$33 00 
30 00 

180 00 
23 00 

19 91 
1 18 

469 74 
77 53 

201 05 
10 00 
40 00 
69 50 
13 80 
72 51 

780 00 
45 00 
28 13 

I 2,131 52 

69 00 

562 50 

25 00 

600 00 

4,139 36 

17 67 

40 00 

20 00 
S6 68 

1 00 
36 12 

4 50 

19 

22 50 

439 70 

75 00 

34 00 

574 10 

9 62 

4 50 

8 75 

25 80 

I 210 83 

17 50 

60 00 

54 58 

4 60 

2 03 
67 50 
56 35 
25 58 

100 00 

83 07 

100 00 

$11,803 90 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



47 



Statement F. — Work done in Sewing-room No. 1. 



ARTICLES. 


Made. 


Repaired. 


Total. 


Arsons, ...... 


292 


432 


724 


Bed spreads, 










_ 


1 


1 


Bed ticks, . 










_ 


167 


167 


Bibs, . 










48 


_ 


48 


Bands, 










12 


_ 


12 


Baby napkins, 










89 


- 


89 


Blankets, . 










- 


1 


1 


Curtains, 










55 


_ 


55 


Coats, . 










_ 


342 


342 


Clothes bags, 










3 


_ 


3 


Dish cloths, 










29 


_ 


29 


Dresses, 










175 


32 


207 


Drawers, 










242 


67 


309 


Eye shades, 










8 


_ 


8 


Garters, 










65 


_ 


65 


Hose, . 










- 


2,832 


2,832 


Ironing sheets, 










5 


- 


5 


Night dresses, 










70 


25 


95 


Night drawers, 










12 


_ 


12 


Night shirts, 










84 


_ 


84 


Names sewed on 










681 


_ 


681 


Pillow slips, 










302 


1 


303 


Pillow ticks, 










84 


_ 


84 


Pants, . 










_ 


15 


15 


Shirt waists, 










36 


_ 


36 


Sacks, . 










64 


18 


82 


Shirts, 










- 


1,464 


1,464 


Skirts, 










126 


_ 


126 


Sheets, 










318 


114 


432 


Screen, 










1 


_ 


1 


Tea bags, . 










7 


_ 


7 


Table napkins, 










217 


_ 


217 


Table cloths, 










6 


11 


17 


Towels, 










466 


250 


716 


Waists, 










181 


_ 


181 


Wash cloths, 










46 


- 


46 












3,724 


5,772 


9,496 



48 



STATISTICS PRIMARY SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Statement G-. — Work done in Sewinq-room No. 2. 



ARTICLES. 


Made. 


Repaired. 


Total. 


Blouses, 




52 


52 


Caps, . 












372 


94 


466 


Jackets, 












80 


2,466 


2,546 


Kitchen aprons, 












15 


40 


55 


Mittens, 












6 


- 


6 


Pants, . 












688 


3,495 


4,183 


Shirts, 












1,049 


- 


1,049 


Suspenders, 












• 238 


143 


381 


Waists, 












36 


- 


36 














2,484 


6,290 


8,774 



Total number of articles made, 
Total number of articles repaired, 



6,208 
12,062 

18,270 



Statement H. 

Walter A. Wheeler, Superintendent and Disbursing Officer of the 
State Primary School, in account with the State Treasurer. 

Dr. 

Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1891, $100 00 

received from appropriation for current expenses for 

1891, 12,192 47 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1891, 2,077 34 

received from appropriation for current expenses for 

1892, 42,365 88 

received from appropriation for boarding out children 

for 1892, 5,068 94 

received from special appropriation of 1891 for coal 

shed, water supply, plumbing and drainage, . . 143 57 

$61,948 20 
Cash received from sales, 141 17 

$62,089 37 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



49 



Cr. 

Disbursements for three months, ending Dec. 31, 1891, 
Disbursements for nine months, ending Sept. 30, 1892, 
Cash on hand Oct. 1, 1892, 



Payments to State treasurer, 



$14,513 38 

47,334 82 

100 00 

$61,948 20 

141 17 



$62,089 37 

Note. — This institution has no " fund 11 from which to draw for any 
expenditure whatever. It derives its support wholly from the State 
treasury by annual legislative appropriations. 

The per capita cost for the year is $3.58. This sum shows the cost of 
clothing, food and lodging, medical attendance, teaching and supervi- 
sion, — in brief, the entire expense of maintaining all the inmates of the 
institution, — together with all ordinary repairs, such as must constantly 
be made to keep the buildings and appliances in good condition ; in- 
cluding also the cost of heating and lighting the buildings, and of fur- 
nishing an outfit for all pupils going away from the school, and their 
travelling expenses. 

Children placed out on trial are provided with two complete suits of 
clothing, with an overcoat extra in cold weather, the whole outfit costing 
on an average $16.00. 

The State appropriations are made for calendar years, while the 
reports of institutions are made for years ending Sept. 30. 

It will therefore readily be seen, that, while the expenditures are 
kept within the yearly appropriations, the expense for the institution 
year may be larger or smaller than the appropriation, including, as it 
does, parts of two calendar years. 

Statement I. — Employment of Children. 
There are employed in the — 



Dormitories and other parts of the house. . 

Sewing-room No. 1, 

Sewing-room No. 2, 

Dining-hall, 

Kitchen, 

Shoe shop, 

Bakery, 

Laundry, 

Hospital, 

On the farm and at the barns, 

Dormitories, and miscellaneous work about the house 
and grounds, ' 



Girls, 28; boys, 112; total, 140. 




11 
13 



50 



STATISTICS PRIMARY SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Statement J. — Children boarded in Families. 

Children "boarded in families Sept. 30, 1892, paid for from 

the appropriations of State Primary School, ... 75 

Number of days' board paid for, ...... 25,788 

Amount paid during the year, . . . . . $7,146 28 

Weekly per capita cost, 1 91 

Note. — This sum does not include expense of investigation of places, 
nor of visiting the children after being located, which is paid by the 
Department of In-door Poor, and increases the cost to the State. 



Statement K. — Recapitulation of Inventory. 



Taken by W. A. Breckenridge and Enos Calkins 

Sept. 30, 1892 
Land, ...... 

Buildings, ..... 

Live stock, 

Products of farm, . 

Carriages and agricultural implements. 
Machinery and mechanical fixtures, 
Beds and bedding (inmates'), 
Other furniture (inmates'), . 
Clothing and shoes (inmates'), 
Superintendent's department, 
Dry goods, ..... 
Groceries and provisions, 
Drugs and medicines, . 
Library and school supplies, . 
Heating, water and gas (with fixtures), 

Fuel, 

Miscellaneous, 



of Palmer, Mass , as of 



$23,014 81 

94,755 00 

5,555 50 

5,492 40 

3,646 47 

10,807 86 

4,527 46 

4,693 50 

4,889 30 

5,557 47 

1,815 99 

2,383 22 

560 00 

1,550 78 

22,400 00 

1,814 25 

1,486 48 



$194,950 49 



Statement L. — Resources and Liabilities. 

Resources. 
Cash on hand, $100 00 



Unexpended appropriations, 



Miscellaneous bills, 



Liabilities. 



27,065 18 

$27,165 18 

1,704 97 



$25,460 21 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



51 



Statement M. — Summary of Farm Account. 



Dr. 

To live stock, as per inventory, . . . 

wagons and agricultural implements, as per inventory, 

paid carpenter, painter, etc., for repairs 

wages of farm help, 

board of farm help, 

labor of children, 

live stock, . 

grain, feed, etc., 

hardware, farm tools, etc 

blacksmithing and repair; 

lumber, 

harness and repairs, 

seeds, fertilizers, etc 

rent of pasture, 

sundries, . 



Cr. 

By farm product of 1891, as per inventory, . 
labor for the school, ..... 
cost of keeping horses used for the school, 
sale of live stock, 
beef, . 
veal, . 
pork, . 

eggs and poultry, 
milk, . 
wood, 

hay, straw, ensilage, etc., 
fruit and vegetables, 
ice, .... 



56,999 60 

2,436 30 

234 37 

2,126 80 

1,132 00 

420 00 

145 50 

1,614 19 

298 62 

154 86 

243 12 

20 85 

78 29 

170 00 

117 11 



116,191 61 


." . $4,620 75 


514 


56 


310 


11 


87 


17 


469 


74 


83 


07 


574 


10 


106 


51 


4,139 


36 


. . . 100 00 


2,933 


34 


2,673 47 


562 


50 



$17,174 68 



52 PHYSICIAN'S REP'T PRIMARY SCHOOL. [Oct. 



PHYSICIAN'S EEPOET. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

The annual report of the hospital of the State Primary 
School for the year ending Sept. 30, 1892, is respectfully 
submitted. 



Number in hospital Sept. 30, 1891, . 
admitted during the year, . 
discharged during the year, 

of deaths, 

remaining in hospital Sept. 30, 1892, 



30 

636 

7 
29 



The following is a list of cases admitted to hospital during 
the year, together with some not admitted, but treated at 



Acute gastric catarrh, 


1 


Dj'smenorrhoea, . 


1 


Adenitis, 


1 


Diphtheria, 


5 


Abscess of knee, 


1 


Dermatitis, . 


3 


Abscess of thumb, 


1 


Eczema, . . 


6 


Abscess of toe, . 


1 


Epistaxis, . 


2 


Burns, superficial, 


1 


Erysipelas, . 


1 


Bronchitis, , 


12 


Epilepsy, . 


1 


Cold, .... 


30 


E nteral gi a, . 


1 


Constipation, 


2 


Enterocolitis, 


1 


Coxalgia, . 


3 


Fracture of tibia, 


1 


Croup, spasmodic, 


3 


Fracture of clavicle, . 


2 


Chorea, 


2 


Fracture (Colles), 


2 


Conjunctivitis, . 


10 


Fracture of ulna, 


1 


Chlorosis, . 


2 


Furuncle, . 


6 


Congestion of lungs, . 


2 


Felon, 


1 


Cholera infantum, 


1 


Gastritis, . 


2 


Curvature of spine, . 


4 


Gastralgia, . 


4 


Dislocated elbow, 


1 


Hysteria, . 


1 


Dislocated wrist, 


1 


Hernia, inguinal, 


1 


Dislocated ankle, 


1 


Hernia, scrotal, with para- 




Debility, . 


3 


plegia,. 


1 


Diarrhoea, . 


31 


Herpes, , 


2 



1892.] PUBLIC 


DOCUMENT — No. 18. 


53 


Herpes zoster, . 


3 


Rachitis, 


2 


Headache, . 


33 


Rotheln, 


5 


Indigestion, 


44 


Scrofulosis, 


6 


Incontinence of urine, 


30 


Shock from fall, 


1 


" La grippe," 


36 


Stomatitis, . 


4 


Measles, 


122 


Sore toes, . 


20 


Neuralgia, . 


2 


Suppurating cervical gland 


2 


Oxyuris vermicularis, 


2 


Sprains, 


9 


Odontalgia, 


4 


Scabies, 


7 


Otalgia, 


12 


Scarlet-fever, 


3 


Otitis media purulenta, 


6 


Tonsilitis, . 


68 


Pharyngitis, 


12 


Tonsilitis, follicular, . 


2 


Pannus, 


1 


Tuberculosis, 


1 


Phthisis, 


1 


Tinea circinata, . 


6 


Pruritis vulvae, . 


3 


Ulcer of cornea, . 


10 


Pyaemia, 


1 


Ulcer of leg, 


1 


Parotitis, . 


36 


Unclassified, 


12 


Prolapsus of rectum, . 


1 


Vomiting, . 


11 


Pott's disease, with psoas 




Vertigo, 


1 


abscess, 


1 


Vaccinia, . 


24 


Pneumonia, 


15 


Wounds, punctured, . 


2 


Rheumatism, 


9 


Wounds, contused, 


6 


Rhus poison, 


6 


Wounds, incised, 


3 


Operations : — 








Removal of necrosed bone 


from infe 


irior maxilary, 


1 


Removal of tumor from m 


:ck, 


. 


1 


Excision of cervical gland 


• • 




1 


Tenotomy for strabismus, 






4 

1 
1 


j.i luecioiiiy , . 
Operation for partial anky 


losis of ki 


lee-ioint, 



Above operations were performed by Dr. John Morgan of 
Springfield, from all of which the patients made good recov- 
eries. 

The general health of the school was excellent until in 
February, when measles became epidemic, after which for 
the following two months the hospitals, both isolation and 
general, were full, and much of the time crowded. The 
epidemic did not entirely disappear until early in May, since 
when there has been but little sickness, the year closing 
with but one case of acute disease in the hospital. There 
have been seven deaths during the year : two died of tuber- 
culosis, one a boy of seventeen years, the other a girl of 
fifteen, with Pott's disease and psoas abscess; one of bron- 
cho-pneumonia, — a child of three years; one of pyemia, 



54 PHYSICIAN'S KEPT PRIMARY SCHOOL. [Oct. 

— a baby of nine months ; a boy of twelve years died of 
convulsions ; a girl of twelve years from acute gastric ca- 
tarrh ; and a girl often from diphtheretic croup. 

After the care taken last year to wipe out any possible 
germs of diphtheria, we are very sorry to have to again re- 
port five cases, and have been not a little puzzled to locate 
the source of infection, until recently, when a water-closet 
in the girls' basement was found to be in a very unsanitary 
condition, due to defective drainage. This received imme- 
diate attention, — new closets and drainage pipes replacing 
the old ; and again we are hopeful that its true source has 
been discovered, and the evil remedied. To further prevent 
contagious diseases, all children are examined upon entering 
the institution, and, if under ten years of age, are placed in 
quarantine for two weeks, and often those over ten years, if 
any history of contagion can be elicited, or the locality from 
which the} T came is considered doubtful. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH GABLE, 

Bcsidenl Physician. 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 55 



PRINCIPAL'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the State Primary School. 

On the 1st of October, 1891, the school opened with 295 
pupils. Since that time a large number have been dis- 
charged and some have been admitted, making the attend- 
ance at the close of the year 214. Some of these children 
have attended school all day, some have given half a day 
to school-room work and the other half to industrial 
occupations. 

A large number of boys and girls, from ten to twelve 
years of age inclusive, have been admitted, who could 
neither read nor write. It was necessary to place these 
children in classes with pupils coming from the kinder- 
garten. Many of them, attending school regularly, have 
made rapid progress. 

The seventh class receives the largest number of new 
pupils. Two years ago some work was introduced into this 
room with the aim to make the class an advanced kinder- 
garten. It is hoped that this idea can be carried out still 
further. 

Many of the children acquire slowly but have a power of 
retention that is encouraging. When one considers the 
irregular attendance, arising from the demands of the differ- 
ent departments of work and the constant coming and going 
of the pupils, it is a surprise that so much is accomplished. 

Our course of study is laid out to conform as nearly as 
possible with that of the best public schools of the State. 
It has been in operation for several years, and has proved to 
be well adapted to our needs. 

It is a source of regret that many promising boys, who 
have never before had an opportunity to study, are dis- 
charged before receiving a common school education. This 



56 PRINCIPAL'S REFT PRIMARY SCHOOL. [Oct. 

disadvantage is sometimes a necessity, in order to encourage 
the boys' desire to become self-supporting. 

With closer grading more rapid progress could be made, 
which is especially desirable in the advanced classes. The 
discontinuance of the third class in May and the second class 
in June, on account of diminished numbers, is now sorely 
felt, particularly the former. We have received a great 
many new pupils during the last few weeks. If this in- 
crease in numbers continues, it will warrant the reopening 
of one of these class rooms. 

In no lesson have the pupils showm more interest than in 
the one given once a week in physiology and hygiene, in- 
cluding familiar talks on alcoholic stimulants and narcotics. 
It is hoped that on some, at least, a lasting impression has 
been made. 

During the coming year we hope to accomplish more in 
language. The five minutes' information talks by the pupils, 
which have been introduced into the chapel exercises, will 
be a great aid to the teachers in this direction. 

The Sloyd work has been greatly enjoyed by the boys. 
It has given variety to their work, and broken up the mo- 
notony of the school-room. They have been much inter- 
ested in completing pieces of work to take avvay with them, 
to send to their friends and to give to their teachers. The 
work has also been a help to them in their play, enabling 
them to make better kites and sleds, and other things in 
which boys delight. Every influence that is helpful in their 
innocent pleasures is especially welcome in our school, as it 
makes the children less in the power of the many tempta- 
tions with which they have to battle, — temptations that 
may not even present themselves to children who have 
always had happy surroundings and the help of a good 
inheritance. 

The library and the numerous periodicals with which the 
school is generously supplied are highly appreciated by 
pupils and teachers. Great care is taken to have them form 
a taste for the best literature, and to inspire them with an 
admiration for all that is noble and good. The older pupils 
are much interested in current topics, and in their talk on 
such subjects show a good degree of intelligence. 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. '18. 57 

We have been gratified in many instances by seeing the 
pupils not only interested but even enthusiastic in their 
work. Such children make rapid progress. All are re- 
sponsive to kind words and actions, — some are touchingly 
so. This leads us to be hopeful of all, despairing of none. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUGENIA M. FULLINGTON, 

Principal. 
Monsox, Mass., Oct. 1. 1892. 



REPORT OF THE OFFICERS 

OF THE 

LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS 

AT 

WESTBOIiOUGH. 

1891-92. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

I have the honor herewith to transmit the annual report 
of statistics of this institution for the year 1891-92. 

While there have been no novel features introduced into 
the plan of work this year, there have been evidences of im- 
provement, furnishing ground for encouragement to officers 
and superintendent alike. 

The report of the principal, on page 73, gives a fair idea 
of what has been accomplished in the different grades of the 
school, and will repay a careful reading. 

The military drill has been continued, with excellent effect 
upon the boys in the direction of erect carriage and good 
discipline. 

The results of a year's trial of the Ling system of gym- 
nastics has been eminently satisfactory. A brief explanation 
of the system, from the pen of the instructor, will be found 
on page 75. The exercises have seemed attractive to the 
boys, the physical effects good, while the mental and 
moral influence has seemed full of promise. It is believed 
that a judicious use of the medical gymnastics will bring 
about great improvement in the case of boys who, through 
deficient physical development, are dull and often appa- 
rently lacking in mental capacity. 

In the Sloyd teaching an attempt has been made to grade 
and classify so that instruction may be given to classes in- 
stead of individuals. The wood-work was laid aside last 
spring, and a course of twelve lessons in mechanical draw- 
ing given to five of the seven families of boys, as the initial 
step towards this change. They were then classified by 
their drawing and by the model upon which they were last 
working. This brought together boys who had been in- 



62 SUPT.'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

structed in the mechanical drawing and those who had not. 
Those who had not had the drawing quite generally lost 
their places in grade at the end of six weeks, while those 
who had received the drawing maintained their places with 
apparent ease. So far no more difficulty has been experi- 
enced in producing good finished work with class than with 
individual instruction. Now, however, classes beginning the 
Sloyd are given a special brief course in mechanical drawing 
before taking the wood-working tools in their hands, instead 
of beginning wood-working and drawing together, and devel- 

CO o O O 

oping them pari passu. There are many advantages to the 
pupil on the side of class instruction, among which are greater 
independence in work, more individuality, keener attention 
and greater exercise in correct comprehension of language. 
The teacher is able to give better instruction with less nerv- 
ous fatigue, and can better judge of the quality of the 
teaching by its effects upon the pupil. 

I am convinced, from my observation of these boys, that 
despite the good degree of attention which has already been 
given to drawing, a much larger measure of time and in- 
struction devoted to this branch would be found highly 
beneficial. It is an acknowledged fact that drawing is the 
proper foundation of all industrial art ; and yet the outcome 
of the effort bestowed upon drawing in the majority of 
schools is the merest smattering, almost valueless for prac- 
tical purposes. What clear expression in words is to a 
thought, that drawing is to a concept which shall take on 
proper material form. As one main object to be kept in 
view in the training of these boys is a preparation to earn 
an honest living at some industrial calling, the teaching of 
drawing for its industrial value ought to be emphasized, 
even to the extent of employing extra teaching force if 
necessary. 

The farm products have been abundant. The plan of as- 
signing the various crops to be grown to the different fami- 
lies for purposes of cultivation has been quite successful. A 
little work under the direction of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station at Amherst has been begun. Considerable 
road building has been accomplished. Quite an area has 
also been cleared of rocks. Several thousand feet of tile 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 63 

drains have been dug and laid, thus redeeming a number of 
acres of valuable meadow land. 

Two cases of tuberculosis have recently been discovered 
in the herd of cows. There had been no suspicious symp- 
toms observed until a cow very suddenly died, apparently 
from colic. An autopsy showed tuberculosis in an advanced 
stage in the lymphatic glands. Dr. Penniman of Worcester 
was called in, who made a careful examination of the herd. 
One young cow at his suggestion was killed on suspicion, 
and the disease was found to have clearly developed in the 
glands of the abdominal cavity. No other cows furnished 
any discoverable ground of suspicion of the disease. The 
condition of our cow stable, w T hich is as good and probably 
better than that of the average farmer's stable, seems to me 
"very favorable to the development of this disease. The 
profitable production or" milk in cold weather requires that 
the cows be kept as warm as possible. This can most easily 
be accomplished by shutting up the cows, so as to retain the 
largest per cent, of animal heat. The air of an ordinary 
cow stable in cool weather is in consequence strongly im- 
pregnated with the poisonous exhalations from the lungs 
and bodies of the cows, and usually the fermenting manure 
in the cellar beneath adds to the gaseous horrors. No ad- 
equate provision is made for ventilation. These circum- 
stances demand attention, if the disease is to be successfully 
combated. 

The present mode of disposal of our sewage is open to 
grave criticism. Some measures should be taken at an early 
day to take care of it in a safe and proper manner. 

An efficient system of lighting is still a great desideratum. 
The light from gasolene is so unsatisfactory that its use has 
been confined to two buildings. Kerosene, which is used 
in the remaining buildings, is dangerous, and has more than 
once within the last year come near resulting in a disastrous 
conflagration. I therefore renew the suggestion made one 
year ago, that a special appropriation for an electrical plant 
be asked of the next Legislature. 

The number of boys in the school during the past year, 
instead of remaining stationary or only slightly increasing, 
has risen so that the average for the year has been eleven 



64 SUPT.'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

per cent, greater than for the preceding year. The need of 
another cottage has been pronounced for a good part of the 
year, and the want of one is seriously embarrassing the 
work of the school. 

The number of boys returned has been somewhat unusual , 
but this is largely due to the vigilance and activity of the 
visitor, Mr. Thomas H. Benton, rather than to an increased 
unreliability on the part of the boys placed out. Any boy 
who has not done well has been promptly visited, and, 
where there seemed to be any uncertainty about the suitable- 
ness of the^lace, another place has been found for him, so 
that he might have a fair chance to show his disposition to 
do well. The records of the institution show 509 visits paid 
by the agent of the State Board of Lunacy and Charity dur- 
ing the year. The condition of boys subject to visitation 
appear to be as follows : doing well, 314; not doing well, 
14; whereabouts unknown, 35. Twelve of the unknown 
disappeared during the past year. There were released on 
probation to parents and others 120, of whom 9 were returned 
to the school for unsatisfactory behavior. 

The gross weekly per capita cost is $4.76. The sanitary 
repairs at Willow Park, making a deficiency appropriation 
necessary, together with the purchase of new uniforms last 
fall, are responsible for the increased per capita cost. The 
considerable increase in the number of boys made the pur- 
chase of unusual quantities of bedding and furniture neces- 
sary, and the purchase of coal for the coming year at a 
sharp advance in price helped to swell the rate of expendi- 
ture ; so that, combined with the three other enlarged out- 
lays just named, the total increase was between $4,000 
and $5,000 over the corresponding expenditures of the pre- 
vious year. This sum more than accounts for the increase 
in the per capita cost above that of last year. 

My officers have co-operated with me loyally, and on the 
whole have shown themselves an efficient corps of workers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. F. CHAPIN, 

Superintendent. 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18, 



65 



Table No. 1. 

Showing the Number received and discharged, and the General 
Condition of the School, for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1892. 



Boys in school Sept. 30, 1891, . 
Received. — Since committed, 

Returned from places, 

Recommitted, . 
Elopers recaptured, 



Whole number in school during the year, 



Released. 



On probation to parents, . 

On probation to others, 

To Massachusetts Reformatory. 

To State Farm, Bridgewater, 

As unfit subjects, 

By elopement, 

Died, « 

Returned to court, 



Remaining in school Sept. 30, 1892, 



200 



125 




28 







153 




2 




19 




374 


75 




45 




5 




5 




2 




21 




1 




1 





155 



219 



Table No. 2. 

Showing the Admissions, Number discharged, and Average Number 
of Each Month. 



MONTHS. 



Admitted. 



Discharged. 



Average No. 



1891. 

October, 
November, . 
December, . 

1892. 

January, 

February, . 

March, . 

April, . . . . 

May, . . 

June, . . . . 

July, . 

August, 

September, 

Totals, . 



13 
12 

11 



16 
7 

14 
8 

14 
16 
23 
18 
9 



161 



16 
13 

10 



6 

10 
17 

16 

8 

8 

10 

20 



142 



200.90 
197.87 
197.06 



199.93 
208.62 
203.00 
194.80 
196.06 
202.50 
213.03 
217.38 
215.43 



203.1 



6Q 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 3. 

Showing the Condition of Boys under Twenty-one during the Year 

1891-92. 

With parents, 203 

With others, 125 

Released to go out of the State, 2 

Removed out of the State, 11 

In navy, ............ 8 

Died, 1 

Massachusetts Reformatory, 59 

Other institutions, penal, 17 

State Primary School, 3 

Massachusetts School for Feeble-minded, 2 

Lost sight of : — 

This year, 12 

Previously, .....' 23 

— 35 

Discharged as unfit subjects, 10 

476 

In school Sept. 30, 1892, 219 



695 



Table No. 4. 



Showing the Commitments from the Several Counties the Past Year 

and previously. 



COUNTIES. 


Past Year. 


Previously. 


Totals. 


Barnstable, 
Berkshire, . 
Bristol, 
Dukes, 
Essex, 
Franklin, . 
Hampden, . 
Hampshire, 
Middlesex, . 
Nantucket, . 
Norfolk, . 
Plymouth, . 
Suffolk, 
Worcester, . 








1 

7 

23 

14 
3 

20 

1 

1 

31 

24 


51 

227 

574 

14 

1,021 

54 

373 

79 

1,132 

16 

942 

118 

1,274 

703 


51 

228 

581 

. 14 

1,044 

54 

387 

82 

1,152 

16 

943 

119 

1,305 

727 


Totals, . 






125 


6,578 


6,703 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



67 



Table No. 5. 

Showing Nativity of Parents of Boys committed during the Year. 

Fathers born in United States, 12 

Mothers born in United States, . 7 

Fathers foreign born, 5 

Mothers foreign born, . . . 12 

Both parents born in United States, . ...... 22 

Both parents foreign born, 54 

Unknown, 23 

One parent unknown, . . . . . . . . .16 

Showing Nativity of Boys committed during the Year. 

Born in the United States, 105 

Foreign born (11 in Canada), 19 

Unknown, 1 

125 

Table No. 6. 

Showing by what Authority the Commitments have been made the 

Past Year. 



COMMITMENTS. 



Past Year. 



By district court, 

municipal court, .... 

police court, 

superior court, .... 

trial justices, 

State Board of Lunacy and Charity, 
Total, 



50 

20 

50 

2 

2 

1 



125 



68 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 7. 
Showing Age of Boys when committed. 



AGE. 



Previously. 



Six, . 
Seven, 
Eight, . 
Nine, . 
Ten, . 
Eleven, 
Twelve, 
Thirteen, . 
Fourteen, . 
Fifteen, 
Sixteen, 
Seventeen, . 
Eighteen and over. 
Unknown, . 
Totals, . 



5 

14 
38 

(32 
2 



5 

25 

118 

235 

446 

647 

763 

947 

1,264 

898 

930 

280 

59 

34 



o 

25 

118 

235 

446 

•652 

777 

985 

1,326 

900 

930 

280 

59 

38 



125 



6,651 



6,776 



Average age of boys, 13.736. 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



69 



Table No. 8. 

Showing the Domestic Condition of Boys who have been Inmates of' 
the School during the Year. 



CONDITION. 


Number. 


Had parents, 


180 


no parents, . 








27 


father, 








59 


mother, . 








42 


step-father, . 








15 


step-mother, 








22 


intemperate father, 








114 


intemperate mother, . 








9 


both parents intemperate, 








47 


parents separated, 




. 




15 


attended church, . 








292 


never attended church, 








13 


never attended school, 




. 




1 


not attended school within one year, . 




50 


two years, 




23 


three years, 




11 


been arrested before, 




219 


been inmates of other institutions, 




68 


used intoxicating liquor, ..... 




47 


used tobacco (mostly cigarettes), 




235 


Were employed in mill or otherwise when arrested, 




116 


idle, • ' : 




113 


attending school, 




. 




50 


Could not read or write, 








6 


Could not write, .... 




• • 




_ 


Parents owning residence, . 








38 


Members of family had been arrested, 




120 



70 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct. 



Table No. 9. 

Showing Length of Time the Boys who have left the Past Year 
have spent in the School since Commitment. 



3 months or less, , 


2 


2 years 3 months, . 


7 


4 months, 


1 


2 " 4 . 


2 


5 ... 


- 


2 " 5 . 


3 


6 " ... 


- 


2 " 6 . 


- 


7 " ... 


1 


2 " 7 . 


4 


8 " ... 


. - 


2 " 8 . 


. 2 


9 ... 


1 


2 " 9 . 


2 


10 " ... 


2 


2 " 10 . . 


2 


11 . . 


- 


2 " 11 . . 


4 


lyear, . . . . 


2 


3 years, .... 


2 


1 " 1 month, . 


2 


3 " 1 month, 


1 


1 " 2 months, . 


1 


3 " 2 months, . 


- 


1 " 3 


' 


9 


3 » 3 . 


- 


1 " 4 


' 


5 


3 " 4 . 


- 


1 " 5 


' 


10 


3 " 5 . 


- 


1 " 6 


' 


8 


3 » 6 . 


- 


1 " 7 


' 


7 


3 " 7 . 


- 


1 " 8 


< / . 


7 


3 " 8 . 


- 


1 " 9 


' 


8 


3 " 9 . . 


- 


1 « 10 


' .. . 


8 


3 " 10 . 


1 


1 " 11 


' 


6 


3 «« 11 . 


2 


2 years, .... 


9 


4 years and more, . 


- 


2 " 1 month, . 


2 






2 " 2 months, . 


5 


Total, . 


128 



Average time spent in the institution, 22.1 months. 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



71 



Table No. 10. 

Comparative Table, showing Average Numbers, New Commit- 
ments, etc., for a Period of Ten Years. 





Average 
Number. 


New Com- 
mitments. 


Returned 
for any 
• Cause. 


Placed on 
Probation. 


Discharged 
Otherwise. 


1882-83, 


. 






114.28 


100 


14 


125 


19 


1883-84, 


• 






128.80 


138f 


33 


81 


43 


1884-85,* 


• 


: 




112.18 


64 


33 


81 


71 


1885-86, 








92.82 


59 


44 


90 


18 


1886-87, 


• 






104.32 


93 


31 


80 


16 


1887-88, 


• 






127.24 


99 


38 


91 


22 


1888-89, 








168.23 


124 


39 


93 


19 


1889-90, 


• 






186.46 


92 


19 


89 


16 


1890-91, 








183.96 


109 


21 


99 


16 


1891-92, 


• 






203.88 


125 


30 


20 


16 


Average 


for ten 3 


rears 




144.21 


100.3 


30.2 


84.4 


25.6 



* April, 1885, removed to present location. 

t First year after the reduction of the age for admission from seventeen to four- 



teen years. 



72 



STATISTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. 



[Oct, 



Report of Sewing-room for the Year ending Sept. 3d, 1892. 



Articles Made. 



Articles Repaired. 



Aprons, 
Aprons, white, 
Bed spreads, 
Braces, . 
Caps, . 
Dish towels, . 
Holders, 
Jackets, white, 
Jackets, woollen 
Napkins, 
Pantaloons, . 
Pillow slips, 
Sheets, . 
Shirts, . 

Strips (for labels) 
Table cloths, 
Towels, 

Total, . 



3,283 



Aprons, 
Blankets, 
Blankets, horse, 
Bolster cases, 
Braces, . 
Caps, . 
Coats, . 
Jackets, 
Mattresses, . 
Mittens, 
Napkins, 
Pantaloons, . 
Pillows, 
Pillow slips, 
Robes, . 
Sheets, . 
Shirts, . 
Spreads, 
Table cloths, 
Towels, 
Vests, . 

Total, . 



17 
21 

1 

1 
133 

7 

61 
70 

4 

24 

270 

542 

4 
352 

1 
416 
528 

8 
123 
400 

1 



2,984 



Laundry Work for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1892. 



Number pieces washed, . 
Number pieces ironed, 
Number pieces starched, 
Average number of boys employed, 
Number of different boys employed, 



166,838 

125,323 

5,316 

17 

77 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 73 



PRINCIPAL'S REPORT. 



To the Superintendent of the Lyman School for Boys. 

It is with pleasure and a degree of satisfaction that I pre- 
sent the annual report of our school for the year ending 
Sept. 30, 1892. 

During the year interest in the school work increased 
greatly, which fact is due largely to the faithfulness and 
efficiency of the teachers employed, who, with one excep- 
tion, remained till the close of the year, thus gaining that 
familiarity with the work which is necessary in order to hold 
the attention of the pupils. As so many of the boys come 
to the school with an utter dislike for study and the needful 
restraints of school life, it requires on the part of the teacher 
tact and an aptness to teach, in order to overcome this and 
create in its stead a love of study, without which little can 
be accomplished in school. 

The work of grading has been continued, till there are 
now four of the seven schools in each of which is one grade 
only. Of the one hundred and twenty-five different boys 
received during the year, there were seventy-eight of the C 
and D grades. Of the number, six could neither read nor 
write when they entered the school. To such cases individ- 
ual attention is always given, so that, except there be mental 
deficiency, they are soon brought up to the work of the D 
class. At different times during the year boys who had out- 
stripped their classes have received individual instruction 
from the principal till they have overtaken the next higher 
grade. In this manner pupils have been encouraged and 
the work of the teacher has been lightened. In several in- 
stances boys have gone from one cottage to another to recite 
with those of their grade, an arrangement which has worked 
well. 

As the result of careful drill in lano'ua^e in the lower 



74 PRINCIPAL'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct, 

grades, when the pupils enter the more advanced classes 
they are prepared to study with delight the language of men 
" who drank from the pure well of English undefiled." The 
enthusiasm with which these classes have studied and com- 
mitted poem after poem of Longfellow, Lowell and Whittier 
seem hardly credible. 

In our observation lessons the boys have studied plants, 
soils, common minerals, etc. In March, twigs of apple, 
cherry, willow, etc., in water, were placed in the school- 
rooms, where the development of the buds, leaves and 
flowers was eagerly watched by the pupils. These objects 
also afforded them subjects for drawing, and the convention- 
alized forms of the same, in connection with the forms of 
solids studied in the daily drawing lessons, were used in 
designing patterns for various purposes. 

In the drawing classes more has been done in the line of 
clay modelling (especially in the C and D classes), paper 
cutting, designing and coloring, than previously. The orig- 
inal designs for stained-glass windows, cut from colored 
paper, and the books of original colored designs, exhibited 
at the close of the year, evidenced the skill and ingenuity 
acquired by training and practice in these lines of work. 

A daily weather report has been made out by each school , 
the boys taking observations just before passing into school 
at two p.m. 

Considering a fair handwriting very desirable, we have 
given more time than formerly to the daily drill in penman- 
ship, which is taught systematically and with encouraging 
results. 

During the first three months of the year the principles of 
music were taught, after which time the boys learned to sing 
by note more than a hundred pieces. 

Appropriate exercises, musical and literary, were given 
on Christmas, Longfellow's Day, Memorial Day, in all 
which the boys were enthusiastic, and acquitted themselves 
creditably. 

Respectfully, 

MARY L. PETTIT, 

Principal. 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 75 



REPORT OF THE INSTRUCTOR OF 
GYMNASTICS. 



To the Superintendent of the Lyman School for Boys. 

In the introduction of gymnastics as an accessory to the 
educational methods already employed, the purpose was 
twofold : first, to give the mind such training as to cause it 
more readily to receive impressions, and the nervous and 
muscular systems to respond more instantaneously to its 
commands ; second, to give the boys daily systematic exer- 
cise of a nature best calculated to develop the body in a 
legitimate way. 

The Ling (Swedish) system of school .gymnastics is ar- 
ranged on the progressive scale. It does not at once require 
of the pupil all there is in him, but by starting with the 
simplest movements, which require little effort, the work 
for all muscles is imperceptibly increased, thus raising his 
standard of physical possibilities. Particular attention is 
paid to those movements which affect the correct position of 
the shoulders, the straightening of the spine, the enlarge- 
ment of the thoracic cavity and the action of the heart. 

The scheme has not yet had a fair trial. A close observa- 
tion of the boys as they appear in the class drill, however, 
will demonstrate these facts : there is an increased power of 
fixed and sustained attention, a quickened mental action, a 
more instantaneous and better-controlled nervous and mus- 
cular response, and a greater interest in the drill and desire 
to conform more nearly to what is right, — which I claim 
are a long stride in the right direction. 

The greatest gain is perceptible in those who have been 
here six months or more, and in those who are farther ad- 
vanced mentally and stronger physically. With the applica- 



76 KEPORT GYMNASTICS LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

tion of medical gymnastics we hope to reach those who are 
below the average in physical ability, and not susceptible to 
the school gymnastics. 

Apparatus will be added this year, as supplementary to 
the free-standing movements, when better results may be 
expected. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALLISTON GREENE, 

Instructor. 



1892.] PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 77 



PHYSICIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Trustees of the State Primary and Reform Schools. 

At the close of last year a boy from Lyman Hall was con- 
fined in the hospital with typhoid fever. In October four 
cases came from Willow Park; one, a boy of feeble consti- 
tution, died on the fourteenth day, the others recovered. 
The cause of this outbreak was sought, and all suspicious 
conditions removed so far as possible at the time. No other 
cases occurred till in August one came from Maple Cottage, 
followed in September by one each from Lyman Hall * and 
Wayside Cottage ; these are now convalescent. 

The reappearance of the disease this autumn proves the 
cause still present. We may not be able to demonstrate 
where this cause resides, but there is no doubt in my mind 
that it is in the drains and cesspools. Some defects in the 
sewers were corrected last year, but the cesspools remain 
where the overflow runs into fields used for the cultivation 
of fruits and vegetables which are consumed without cook- 
ing. The disease having gained a foothold and its germs 
found lodgement here, it is probable the present system of 
drainage will grow more dangerous every year, and continue 
a menace to the school till a radical change is made in the 
disposal of its sewage. 

Exclusive of typhoid fever there has been much sickness 
this year ; conditions of debility and disorders of digestion 
have been very common. Probably the influences which in 
some caused the fever have contributed to produce other 
sickness. 

* This boy had recently been transferred from Willow Park. 



78 PHYSICIAN'S REPORT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Including everything, 281 boys have made 537 applica- 
tions for treatment; that is, counting each case but once, 
however long it continued. Of these, many were attended 
by the nurse alone, and probably one-half had ailments for 
which medical advice is not usually obtained. About one in 
eight of all applications were accidents. 

The hospital has been occupied by 119 boys 929 days. I 
have made 208 visits during the year. 



Respectfully submitted, 



F. E. COREY, 

Physician. 



Westborough, Sept. 30, 1892. 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



79 



TREASURER'S REPORT. 



1891- 


— October, received from the State Treasurer, . 




$4,037 47 




November, " " " " 




5,652 50 




December, " " " 




2,511 52 


1892- 


— January, " " " " 




4,952 38 




February, " " " 




3,611 70 




March, 




5,079 49 




April, " '■ " 




3,766 27 




May, 




3,574 40 




June, " " " " 




6,531 04 




July, 




3,813 48 




August, " " " wt 




2,785 45 




September, " " kt 




4,211 46 






$50,527 16 




Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury. 


1891 - 


— October, . $4,037 47 




November, 














5,652 50 




December, . 














2,511 52 


1892- 


— January, . 
February, 
March, 
April, 
May, .. 
June, . 
July, . 
August, 


• ■ 














4,952 38 
3,611 70 
5,079 49 
3,766 27 
3,574 40 
6,531 04 
3,813 48 
2,785 45 




September, 














4,211 46 






$50,527 16 



Amount drawn from State Treasury. 
Special Appropriation (Acts of 1891, Chap. 347) 



1891 — November, 

December, 

1892 — February, 



$1,031 67 

341 29 

99 50 



$1,472 46 



80 TREASURER'S REFT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 

Amount drawn from State Treasury. 

Special Appropriation (Acts of 1892, Chap. 30). 

1892 — July, $1,173 14 

August, 692 85 

September, 3,719 82 

$5,585 81 

Expenditures. 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Special Appropriation 
(Acts of 1891, Chap. 347). 

1891 — November, $1,031 67 

December, 341 29 

1892 — February, 99 50 

$1,472 46 

Bills paid as per Vouchers at State Treasury for Special Appropriation 
(Acts of 1892, Chap. 30). 

1892 — July, $ 1,173 14 

August, 692 85 

September, 3,719 82 

$5,585 81 

Expenditures for the Year ending Sept. 30, 1892. 

Salaries of officers and employees, . . . $17,969 87 
Wages of other persons temporarily employed, . 1,060 97 

$19,030 84 

Provisions and grocery supplies, including — 

Meat, $1,883 81 

Fish 637 63 

Eggs, 229 97 

Lard 93 55 

Potatoes, 65 35 

Fruit and vegetables, 191 06 

Bread and crackers, 3,981 21 

Flour and cereals, 293 38 

Beans and pease, 348 61 

Ice 102 81 

Tea, coffee, cereal coffee and chocolate, . . 272 88 

Sugar and molasses, ...... 506 60 

Butter and cheese, 1,169 03 

Amounts carried forward, . . $9,775 89 $19,030 84 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



81 



Amounts brought forward, 



. $9,775 89 $19,030 84 



Provisions and grocery supplies, including 
Salt and other spices, 
Nuts and candy, .... 
Soap and other washing material, 

Milk, 

Vinegar, 

Essences, 

Cream tartar, soda, baking powder and starch, 
Other groceries and provisions, 



Clothing — 

Hats and caps, . 

Shoes and repairs to same, 

Suits, summer and winter, 

Stockings, . 

Shirts, winter, . 

Shirts, summer, . 

Neckties, 

Suspenders, 

Handkerchiefs, . 

Mittens, 

Buttons, 

Thread, 

Collars, 

Needles and thimbles 

Shoulder straps, . 

Travelling bags, 

Clothing, unclassified 



Furniture, beds and bedding — 

Chairs, tables, bedsteads, springs and 

tresses, .... 
Stoves and stove furniture, 
Iron, tin, copper and wooden ware, 
Glassware and crockery, . 
Agate ware, .... 

Cutlery, 

Lamps, lanterns, chimneys and wick 
Brooms and brushes, . 

Baskets, 

Sewing-room machines and repairs 
Laundry machinery and repairs, 
Bed coverings and cloth for same, 
Table spreads and towels,. 
Rugs, carpets and oil cloth, 



43 24 
13 83 



257 
8 
55 
30 
37 
11 



51 

25 
72 
41 
66 

25 



Amounts carried forward, 



$215 20 

924 06 

2,725 24 

172 27 

539 16 

277 79 

5 25 

61 31 

23 74 

32 10 

87 98 

54 60 

16 00 

1 80 

30 75 

30 03 

12 52 



t- 




. $231 


55 


63 


20 


. 157 


12 


97 


04 


19 


26 


29 


42 


. 138 


35 


99 


72 


18 


00 


82 80 


28 


63 


. 420 


15 


. 207 


46 


. 207 


92 



10,233 76 



5,209 70 



$1,800 62 $34,474 30 



82 TREASURER'S REPT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 



Amounts brought forward, 

Furniture, beds and bedding — 
Shears, combs and brushes, 
Window shades and screens, 
Furnace and register. 
Unclassified, 

School property — 
(a) School supplies : 

Books, school, 

Books, miscellaneous, 

Paper and envelopes, 

Pens, penholders, pencils and erasers. 

Slates and slate pencils, . 

Blank books, 

Drawing and painting material 

Ink 

Music, .... 

Black-board. 

Maps, 

Mucilage, .... 

Manual training tools and supplies. 
(6) Institution property, unclassified, 

Fuel and lights, .... 

Medicines and medical supplies, 

Ordinary repairs, .... 

Horse and cattle shoeing, . 

Express, freight and passenger fares, 

Stationery, postage, telegrams and newspaper 

Seeds, plants and fertilizers, farm tools and re 

Water, 

Printing material, 

Live stock, 

Grain, feed and meal for slock, 



.$1,800 62 $34,474 30 


11 


48 


. 104 78 


43 


00 


. 129 


81 



pain 



$267 76 

28 08 

84 32 

34 29 

14 58 

17 36 

58 55 

9 00 

47 19 

12 75 

102 15 

9 00 

150 28 

235 11 



2,089 69 



1,070 42 

4,467 32 
102 24 

3,451 33 
132 73 
956 53 
605 97 

1,420 87 

380 00 

198 22 

52 50 

1,125 04 



Total, 



$50,527 16 



1892.] 



PUBLIC DOCUMENT — No. 18. 



83 



Superintendent's Report of Cash Transactions. — Receipts. 







Farm 

Produce 

Sales. 


Miscel- 
laneous 

Sales. 


Labor 

of 
Boys. 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 


1891. 














October, 


Received cash from, . 


- 


$0 50 


$1 75 


- 


$2 25 


November, . 


« m 


$31 95 


- 


4 50 


- 


36 45 


December, 


" . 


- 


• 


2 50 


- 


2 50 


1892. 














January, 


" " " 


4 92 




1 48 


- 


6 40 


February, 


» " • 


12 90 


- 


9 75 


- 


22 65 


March, . " " " . 


9 13 


13 16 


1 10 




23 39 


April, . . ;t " " . 


25 38 


- 


146 84 


$1 67 


173 89 


May, . . " " " 


78 60 


- 


334 03 


- 


412 63 


June, . . " " " . 


43 74 


- 


254 00 


70 


298 44 


July, . 1 " " " 


183 29 


9 50 


89 03 


- 


281 82 


August, . " " " 


31 29 


25 


1 25 


- 


32 79 


September, . " " " . 


27 92 


- 


287 91 


1 24 


317 07 


Totals, 




$449 12 


$23 41 


$1,134 14 


$3 61 


$1,610 28 







Farm 
Produce 


Miscel- 
laneous 


Labor 
of 


Miscel- 
laneous. 


Totals. 






Sales. 


Sales. 


Boys. 




1891. 












October, . 1 Paid State Treasurer, 


- 


$0 50 


$1 75 


- 


$2 25 


November, . ! " " " 


$31 95 


- 


4 50 


- 


36 45 


December, . " " 


- 


- 


2 50 


- 


2 50 


189a. 












January, . " " " 


4 92 


- 


1 48 


- 


6 40 


February, . " " " 


12 90 


- 


9 75 


- 


22 65 


March, . 


" 


9 13 


13 16 


1 10 


- 


23 39 


April, . 


<< (< (i 


25 38 


- 


146 84 


$1 67 


173 89 


May, . 


" " 


78 60 


- 


334 03 


- 


412 63 


June, 


" " 


43 74 


- 


254 00 


70 


298 44 


July, 


183 29 


9 50 


89 03 




281 82 


August, 


31 29 


25 


1 25 


- 


32 79 


September, . 


(( 11 IC 




27 92 


- 


287 91 


1 24 


317 07 


Totals, 


$449 12 


$23 41 


$1,134 14 


$3 61 


$1,610 28 



84 TREASURER'S REFT LYMAN SCHOOL. [Oct. 






80 
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